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Forums > Windsurfing > General > A Beginner on a Wayler....
Author A Beginner on a Wayler....
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VIC
3 Posts
Posted 24/12/2008, 7:59 pm        Report
Evening fellow windsurfers, Yes it is Christmas eve and yes I am on my computer and yes I am looking up windsurfing info! I acquired an old Wayler - 250LT board with a 5.9M sail about 3 weeks ago. I am completely new to windsurfing, but have been about 4 times and can now (fairly) confidently water start and do basic turns. I usually surf in 5-10knt winds (ie. morning and evening) at Lysterfield lake as I want to be very confident before hitting the bay. Purpose of this post - How do I rig the windsurfer properly? My process so far has been to - 1. Put mast in sail 2. Attach and tie downhaul (the mast foot to the sail) 3. Tie boom to mast 4. Tie end of sail to boom very tightly and knot off (the rope has worn so the auto-cleat things dont work properly) 5. Push mast foot into board and rotate clockwise 6. Sail! Basically, I want to know if this is correct and what knots are recommended for each section. Also, the previous owner mentioned I might be able to get a new boom that could clamp to the mast, rather than tie to it. Is this possible? What should I look for? If anybody has any advice that a beginner like me should know, please share! Thanks, Merry Christmas and safe New Year. Sean EDIT: Centreboard goes in when its deep enough!
VIC
600 Posts
Posted 24/12/2008, 8:27 pm        Report
i have a old boom you can buy off me if ya want its a clamp on in good nick fits over 6m sails i wold not bother with that type of boom you have.
VIC
980 Posts
Posted 24/12/2008, 8:31 pm        Report
What area do you live in Quagz1? Maybe you could chat to some of the locals when they are rigging up to get some advice. Most of us are quite prepared to help out someone new to the sport.
VIC
3 Posts
Posted 24/12/2008, 8:42 pm        Report
He he he... I see there are some dedicated surfers out there!!! Yer I have had a chat to a couple of locals except they had the new equipment... I'm still @ uni and got the lot for $100 off ebay.... when the full time job comes then Ill be able to get a decent setup *hopefully*. I'm in Pakenham VIC but frequently travel to Sth Melbourne to visit the missus. I would love a clamp on boom it would make life soooo much easier. Whats ur price on the boom if its nearby?? - Just responded to PM.
NSW
160 Posts
Posted 24/12/2008, 8:46 pm        Report
youve only been out 4 times and in 5-10 knots and you can waterstart?
WA
424 Posts
Posted 24/12/2008, 8:47 pm        Report
Stay with it qz1 and you will open up more than a world of oysters.
WA
5205 Posts
Posted 24/12/2008, 9:00 pm        Report
lalalamort said...
youve only been out 4 times and in 5-10 knots and you can waterstart?
perhaps he means climbing on the board and starting out on the water, as opposed to that flying out of the water like a flying fish thing. Hes way ahead of my efforts. top effort
QLD
2213 Posts
Posted 24/12/2008, 9:07 pm        Report
If the ropes are worn, it's worth your while spending a few bucks on new ones before they break, from a windsurf or sailing shop. At least that's one part of your ancient rig which you'll be able to rely on then! I've seen an old vid where uphauling is referred to as a waterstart...but nowadays waterstarting is the thing where you let the sail pull you up out of the water, not vice versa. Never mind, you're doing fine!! Took me months just to stand up for a few minutes! Please post some pics of your gear, as many as possible, showing how you've rigged it...
VIC
3 Posts
Posted 24/12/2008, 9:53 pm        Report
Hey guys, Thanks for the responses... this forum is great!! OK, answers to your questions: 1. Waterstart - I refer to me climbing onto the board then uphauling the sail as a waterstart - the surfers with new boards and boards with straps can seem to let the sail pull them out of the water. This rig is wayyy to big and im not strong enough to control the sail like that. 2. I will post pics within the next few days - I appreciate your help in advance 3. I'll make the ropes a priority - are there any "good" sailing shops servicing South East you guys know of? Other info - I have been surfing (as in paddle) for a few years now so the balance thing wasnt really an issue. In my last session I finally got comfortable with standing behind the mast foot and leaning against the sail, rather than trying to stand @ 90 deg and pull it. By turning I mean veering - tilting the sail forward (goes away from the wind, if I can remember correctly) leaning it back goes into the wind. The first time was me getting up and falling off, the next was me getting up and then holding the uphaul with one hand and boom with other. Completely wrong now I look back on it, but I figured it out eventually. When a gust came I would let the sail dangle by the uphaul to de-power it. Third/forth times I managed to get up and with about an hour of crap get it to sail with both hands on the boom properly. I cant do a 180 yet so I have to fall off to turn around. Again, thanks for your help and sorry for the long post - I'm excited with this windsurfing business!!! Have a good one - Santa is on his way now!!!! Cheers, Sean
NSW
1976 Posts
Posted 24/12/2008, 10:07 pm        Report
You're doing great mate. Nothing wrong with that gear in those wind ranges (and a bit more). Good bang for the bucks. I still sail those kinda old boards, typically up to about 12 knots. They're fun, and good for teaching and social stuff involving beer and mates too. Waylers used to make one great model, the Ypsi. Surprisingly good old board, but I've never seen it in Australia. Hope this is what you have. Some tips : - booms: get a cheap old clamp-on, if you can. Guys might help - they heaps of those in their sheds. - boom height: should be armpit (aka. underarm) high for those boards in non-planing conditions. Boom 3 feet above your head is overrated. Make sure you adjust the height if you lend to a friend of different height as you. - boom length: make sure the boom is shortest that accommodates a tight sail. If must, tie the clew to one side of the boom - will be more stable. - waterstarts: don't waste too much time on this yet. I see heaps of people spending half their summer on this. Think of all the actual sailing they're missing on. - trick to learning fastast: simple - keep the tacks short, and transit as often as you can, both tacks and gybes. Nothing worse than sailing for 2 hours on the same tack for your learning. - freestyle: there's a lot of fun screwing around you can do on these boards, to add spice to your sailing experience. PM me and will talk to you if you want. Some of them's moves will be useful for you as well when/if you switch to more modern, shorter equipment. Regardless of equipment, you fell in the very best sport in the world... P.
NSW
1976 Posts
Posted 24/12/2008, 10:17 pm        Report
Sean, just saw your post, we're 10 timezones away, yet typing in real-time it seems... Your post is not too long, it's exciting to see people learn and have fun, regardless of levels. Basically if you do all this at your own pace, then your excitment should double every year up to a point... Not going out to bay: you're doing the right thing. Take your time, experiment with different wind angles. Make sure you learn to tack on both sides. (Many learn on one side well, and keep falling on the other.) Basically, do not "prefer" one side. Wind angles: avoid off-shore winds, difficult to come back regardless of your level. If you venture out, 'calculate' where the winds will take you, and where you will come back. Do it when there are other sailors around, just in case. Ropes: guys are right, they're important. Guys on the beach will have bits for you, or get from Bunnings. Make sure they're the non-elastic I-forget-their-name-again type, else your gear will flutter around.
QLD
2213 Posts
Posted 25/12/2008, 12:21 am        Report
You can probably find an old book on windsurfing from your local library or 2nd hand bookstore, which will have diagrams of all the basic things - tacks, gybes, beachstarts etc, (and how to rig old sails!) which will save you having to figure them out intuitively. Might save you a lot of hassle!
VIC
672 Posts
Posted 25/12/2008, 9:59 am        Report
Merry Christmas Those old windsurfers rocks! Here's me and my brothers using our combined strength on those old super heavy rigs. That old board kept us going for a decade. You can't really go too far wrong rigging up that old equipment. Just Like I mentioned in another recent post, those old booms have a habit of wobbling. To make sure the boom is attached tightly to the mast, have the boom lay flat against the mast (not at right angles, which it will be when completely rigged), then tie the boom to the mast. As you then pull the boom out at 90 degrees to the mast you notice how tight it goes. You can still sail with a wobbly boom but it gets annoying. Like someone else said, don't be any hurry to learn to waterstart. I spent a whole summer at age 15 teaching myself. I have never sworn so much in my life. Keep having fun.
51 Posts
Posted 25/12/2008, 8:06 pm        Report
Watch it when you pull the boom down (from lying along the mast, to 90 degrees to the mast). As Leman says, if rigged correctly, the boom gets tighter as you move it down - but the effect can be so powerful it actually breaks the mast. Just move it down gently and without too much force. Good luck on the board. The old boards move better in light winds, so you can get a lot more sailing in.
QLD
2213 Posts
Posted 25/12/2008, 9:25 pm        Report
Leman said...
Merry Christmas Those old windsurfers rocks! Here's me and my brothers using our combined strength on those old super heavy rigs. That old board kept us going for a decade. You can't really go too far wrong rigging up that old equipment. Just Like I mentioned in another recent post, those old booms have a habit of wobbling. To make sure the boom is attached tightly to the mast, have the boom lay flat against the mast (not at right angles, which it will be when completely rigged), then tie the boom to the mast. As you then pull the boom out at 90 degrees to the mast you notice how tight it goes. You can still sail with a wobbly boom but it gets annoying. Like someone else said, don't be any hurry to learn to waterstart. I spent a whole summer at age 15 teaching myself. I have never sworn so much in my life. Keep having fun.
Leman, you are a legend! What a great photo to have!
NSW
1976 Posts
Posted 26/12/2008, 2:14 am        Report
Booms too high
 
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