Forums > Kitesurfing General

Which harness and why

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Created by sabbathbill 1 month ago, 18 Mar 2019
sabbathbill
8 posts
18 Mar 2019 4:13PM
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g'day - have been learning to jump recently and have ended up with sore ribs and think maybe time to upgrade my old first harness, a 2015 NP harness to something else that fits better, maybe a hard shell/rigid - I am still a newb, 80ish kg's riding a twintip, flatwater
There is such a range available it is hard to know where to start after a comfortable fit - was interested in what harness you have and why
thanks

rwtaaffe
NSW, 79 posts
18 Mar 2019 8:32PM
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Go to a shop n try as many different harness as possible. We all have a different shape and want different things from our harness. Rope slider, hook, hard shell, seat etc ??

cauncy
WA, 7042 posts
18 Mar 2019 6:47PM
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rwtaaffe said..
Go to a shop n try as many different harness as possible. We all have a different shape and want different things from our harness. Rope slider, hook, hard shell, seat etc ??


Nah, I think I had 6 brand new harnesses used a couple of times at one stage , might feel good in the shop but get them wet and a couple of sessions boosting / jumping and they gave me the shidts
the strap adjustment buckles are crap / I mentioned for years about using the quick strap system good to see brands now using them, went out last week with the new ion b2 , didn't budge an inch,
crew rave over the rigid back harnesses plus depends what way you ride. Mate likes his sliding around as if it's a sliding spreader

likuid
QLD, 322 posts
19 Mar 2019 8:37AM
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+1 for the Ride Engine.

It's a really small form factor so it doesn't feel like a giant nappy

I have a slipped disc and used to only be able to kite for an hour or so before having to come in and stretch my back out.

Now days, the RE locks in and I feel it supports my entire back without riding up. I can actually ride for as long as my legs will allow .

daggy
WA, 497 posts
19 Mar 2019 1:20PM
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You're hanging too upright as you jump, so the harness is pulling you up by your ribs.
Test try some harnesses in the shops ( the ride engine on me was a terrible fit) then tighten it as much as is comfortable but you're still going to feel the pain if you're boosting like a newbie.
Lean back from your harness a little bit ( not trying to fly horizontal here) and it should help.

ActionSportsWA
WA, 660 posts
19 Mar 2019 4:29PM
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Hi Sabathbill,

From someone who has been selling kiteboarding harnesses for nearly 16 years. I feel experienced enough to offer a few pointers:-

1. Harnesses are the most important piece of gear to get right. They will hurt you and can even incapacitate you when they are wrong.
2. EVERY person is different in shape and needs. This means no one harness is the best for everybody.
3. Try them on in a shop and hang from a rope or whatever from above your head. Everything feels "fine" without loading it.
4. Don't concentrate on what you like about a harness. Identify the things you don't like. Any discomfort can become a major problem with prolonged use.
5. Don't buy on price. The perfect harness for you is not necessarily the most expensive, and the cheapest is not necessarily the worst.
6. Forget the price. The average harness will last for three years or more if you look after it. Spread the cost over three seasons and you'll see that even the most expensive harness (if it is your perfect fit) will be well worth the couple of dollars per session it costs.
7. Opinions are like ar$eholes, everyone has one, yours is the only one that matters and no one knows you, like you.
8. Anyone who states any one particular harness is the best, doesn't know a thing about harnesses (except maybe your identical twin). They only know what is good for their particular body shape.
9. Ive seen two people with seemingly identical looking bodies prefer different harnesses due to rib structure and placement.

Take your time, it's worth getting it right.

What to look for:

It should be 3d shaped to fit your body. Many good harnesses will sit around your waist without even doing up the belt or spreader.
It should be a reputable brand with a proven track record.
It should be ideal for your intended usage.


Happy hunting.

DM

Plummet
4377 posts
20 Mar 2019 1:28AM
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Great advice from DM. A hard shell harness was a game changer for me. Particularly for powered riding. No longer did I get the torso squeezing a soft harness gave when super powered.

psychojoe
WA, 442 posts
20 Mar 2019 3:46AM
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daggy said..
You're hanging too upright as you jump, so the harness is pulling you up by your ribs.
Test try some harnesses in the shops ( the ride engine on me was a terrible fit) then tighten it as much as is comfortable but you're still going to feel the pain if you're boosting like a newbie.
Lean back from your harness a little bit ( not trying to fly horizontal here) and it should help.


This is good advice from daggy.
I too went looking for a replacement harness after I cracked my ribs twice, but after trying almost every harness in almost every shop in Perth I realised I already have the best harness.
Some advice I was given is to keep the kite low in the window, it alleviates pressure on the ribs. Also when boosting I now usually do it inverted, not only does it stop the harness pulling on your ribs it also relieves tennis elbow and reduces the risk of shoulder injury that comes with pulling down on the bar instead of up. Hope that makes sense.
Joe.

LuigiKiter
WA, 184 posts
20 Mar 2019 7:50AM
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psychojoe said..

daggy said..
You're hanging too upright as you jump, so the harness is pulling you up by your ribs.
Test try some harnesses in the shops ( the ride engine on me was a terrible fit) then tighten it as much as is comfortable but you're still going to feel the pain if you're boosting like a newbie.
Lean back from your harness a little bit ( not trying to fly horizontal here) and it should help.



This is good advice from daggy.
I too went looking for a replacement harness after I cracked my ribs twice, but after trying almost every harness in almost every shop in Perth I realised I already have the best harness.
Some advice I was given is to keep the kite low in the window, it alleviates pressure on the ribs. Also when boosting I now usually do it inverted, not only does it stop the harness pulling on your ribs it also relieves tennis elbow and reduces the risk of shoulder injury that comes with pulling down on the bar instead of up. Hope that makes sense.
Joe.


Inverted?

KitersElbow
WA, 71 posts
20 Mar 2019 9:12AM
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The average harness will last for three years or more if you look after it.



This touches on a question I have. I'm wrapping up (I think) season 5 on my harness (Ion). I generally kite around 75 days a year...so easily 300+ sessions on it. The previous harness I had was showing considerable fray on the straps after 4 seasons...was starting to look like a strap might rip open, that's when i replaced it. The current one is showing some fade and fabric wear on the pads, but all the load bearing bits still look and feel solid. And it fits and feels great.

Question is this: should I be replacing it for safety reasons after 5 seasons, or keep rockin' it until it really starts to look and feel unsafe?

ActionSportsWA
WA, 660 posts
20 Mar 2019 10:16AM
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KitersElbow said..

The average harness will last for three years or more if you look after it.





Question is this: should I be replacing it for safety reasons after 5 seasons, or keep rockin' it until it really starts to look and feel unsafe?


Keep rockin' itr man. So long as it's structurally sound and still giving support and comfort. Keep going. If it aint broke ...

DM

psychojoe
WA, 442 posts
20 Mar 2019 1:39PM
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LuigiKiter said..

psychojoe said..


daggy said..
You're hanging too upright as you jump, so the harness is pulling you up by your ribs.
Test try some harnesses in the shops ( the ride engine on me was a terrible fit) then tighten it as much as is comfortable but you're still going to feel the pain if you're boosting like a newbie.
Lean back from your harness a little bit ( not trying to fly horizontal here) and it should help.




This is good advice from daggy.
I too went looking for a replacement harness after I cracked my ribs twice, but after trying almost every harness in almost every shop in Perth I realised I already have the best harness.
Some advice I was given is to keep the kite low in the window, it alleviates pressure on the ribs. Also when boosting I now usually do it inverted, not only does it stop the harness pulling on your ribs it also relieves tennis elbow and reduces the risk of shoulder injury that comes with pulling down on the bar instead of up. Hope that makes sense.
Joe.



Inverted?


You probably could have used google to find the answer.
Inverted means upside down.
Head towards the water, board towards the kite/sky.
It can be difficult to judge landings.

DutchRooster
NSW, 304 posts
27 Mar 2019 10:22PM
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+1 on Ride Engine harness. Awesome. I too have a dodgy back and used to have days of back pain after a decent session. Now I kite endlessly, no more back pain.

Having said that; these harnesses may not work as well if you are overweight. They are shaped to the contour of your back (including the vertical ridge along your spinal cord). So what works for many may not work for you.

THE PIN PULLER
WA, 265 posts
27 Mar 2019 7:28PM
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Just get a nappy one it works for all the oldies down my local

Peahi
VIC, 1035 posts
27 Mar 2019 10:54PM
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DutchRooster said..
+1 on Ride Engine harness. Awesome. I too have a dodgy back and used to have days of back pain after a decent session. Now I kite endlessly, no more back pain.

Having said that; these harnesses may not work as well if you are overweight. They are shaped to the contour of your back (including the vertical ridge along your spinal cord). So what works for many may not work for you.


And if you have fluctuating weight... sometimes cannot get it tight enough so it "rides" up and spreader bar digs into ribs.

cauncy
WA, 7042 posts
27 Mar 2019 8:05PM
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LuigiKiter said..

psychojoe said..


daggy said..
You're hanging too upright as you jump, so the harness is pulling you up by your ribs.
Test try some harnesses in the shops ( the ride engine on me was a terrible fit) then tighten it as much as is comfortable but you're still going to feel the pain if you're boosting like a newbie.
Lean back from your harness a little bit ( not trying to fly horizontal here) and it should help.




This is good advice from daggy.
I too went looking for a replacement harness after I cracked my ribs twice, but after trying almost every harness in almost every shop in Perth I realised I already have the best harness.
Some advice I was given is to keep the kite low in the window, it alleviates pressure on the ribs. Also when boosting I now usually do it inverted, not only does it stop the harness pulling on your ribs it also relieves tennis elbow and reduces the risk of shoulder injury that comes with pulling down on the bar instead of up. Hope that makes sense.
Joe.



Inverted?


your ridiing style shouldnt be dictated by your harness, wank advice sorry



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"Which harness and why" started by sabbathbill