Forums > Kitesurfing Victoria

St Kilda serious accident this afternoon

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Created by ericmb > 9 months ago, 19 Nov 2010
ericmb
SA, 77 posts
19 Nov 2010 4:59PM
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Just got back from beach. Whilst I was there CPR was conducted for 20+ minutes
on a kiter. Word is that he was found face down attached to his kite by another kiter. The kiter brought him ashore and medics came and saved him.

Last I heard is that he had pulse and was breathing on his own when taking into ambulance. Hopefully no permanent damage was done. We ll just have to wait and see.

Hopefully he will live to tell what happened and get back on the board again too!

tenno
QLD, 50 posts
19 Nov 2010 6:36PM
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yeah i heard the same, but also heard he may have been face down in the water for a long period of time. Asked around and no one really knows much on the incident which is surprising. Hope his ok

chino
VIC, 165 posts
19 Nov 2010 7:37PM
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I was there too. I'd seem him kiting before. If I remember correctly he was a beginner I'd like to say tacking both ways and starting to stay upwind but to be honest don't remember. Certainly not dangerous and out of control.

The ambos blasted past me on Fitzroy st as I was driving in... by the time I parked they were already doing CPR. He was found around 1430 face down, still connected to his kite. Apparently his kite had dragged him back to shore as by the time another kiter pulled him to shore he was in waist deep water. Pulseless when they found him, and was probably down for about 30 minutes with CPR, adrenaline, intubation, the works. Flying what looked like a 12m? Older kite.

After about 30 minutes of CPR they got a shockable rhythm, shocked him, and got a pulse back. Still too early to say how he'll end up - us young folk tend to do better than an old guy in the same situation, but 30 minutes downtime is quite a long time.

I don't have any editorial comments about lessons or the sport getting banned or if he was dumb, smart, or whatever. He was someone's son and was just out there trying to have a good time, and it's a shame.

Beersy
TAS, 743 posts
19 Nov 2010 10:35PM
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Not a good situation. Hope the bloke is okay.

axis
VIC, 399 posts
20 Nov 2010 9:01AM
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^^^^ same. not good to hear.

Albos
VIC, 162 posts
20 Nov 2010 10:27AM
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Sad to hear. Good work for the person who pulled him out of the water and started CPR.

The actual chances of restarting someone heart with CPR is very very low, but what you are doing is keeping blood going around the body and keeping the person from dying straight away.

kitesurfjim
VIC, 136 posts
20 Nov 2010 10:57AM
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This was very shocking to hear, Hopes and prayers go out to the guy and his family.
I work on the beach and fortunately for me i was off yesterday and didn't have to witness the incident.

Great job to whoever pulled him out of the water, i heard it was one of the Kite Republic Instructors.
Nice to also see that out of respect all schools cancelled their lessons for the day.

I still don't understand how this can happen and nobody knows anything or even saw anything but, this is not the time and place for that.

any updates on this guys condition would be good also a name too.

chino
VIC, 165 posts
20 Nov 2010 11:17AM
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It wasn't a KR instructor, I think he came later to help pack up the man's kite and stuff. It was this American dude who ended up having to dump his kite in a hurry and ended up spending the next hour untangling his birds nest of lines after the paramedics had left.

So not only did he (maybe) save someone's life, he also lost an hour of awesome kiting.

Man deserves a beer next time I see him.

JW
VIC, 46 posts
20 Nov 2010 2:44PM
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I don't have a lot of details but just heard from the ambulance officer that unfortunately the kiter died. They think he was 28 years old and from Sydney. That's all I could find out at this stage. My sincere thoughts are with his family and friends.

ericmb
SA, 77 posts
20 Nov 2010 5:20PM
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****.. RIP.

ewan kite
VIC, 914 posts
21 Nov 2010 1:40PM
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chino said...

It wasn't a KR instructor, I think he came later to help pack up the man's kite and stuff. It was this American dude who ended up having to dump his kite in a hurry and ended up spending the next hour untangling his birds nest of lines after the paramedics had left.





yes, it was a kite republic instructor. he gave CPR and saved this mans life

Saffer
VIC, 4415 posts
21 Nov 2010 1:49PM
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ewan kite said...
saved this mans life


Unfortunately not if you read one of the previous posts. Despite best attempts from the individuals concerned it seems he didn't make it in the end, although their efforts probably improved his chances substantially. :( Condolences to the family

Big eeeZeee
NSW, 1100 posts
21 Nov 2010 10:40PM
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hearing stories like this makes me want to brush up on my first aid course I did eons ago. They're always updating CPR method aren't they? Something everyone should look into i guess.

Rest in peace dude

chino
VIC, 165 posts
22 Nov 2010 1:01AM
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Big eeeZeee said...

hearing stories like this makes me want to brush up on my first aid course I did eons ago. They're always updating CPR method aren't they? Something everyone should look into i guess.

Rest in peace dude


Without going into too many details, the new consensus is not to bother with mouth to mouth or any artificial breathing, just apply compressions nice and hard until you get tired, then to get someone else to take over. The benefit of mouth to mouth is debatable and if anything it just turns bystanders off the prospect of helping.

Just make sure they don't have a pulse first! If they punch you in the face when you're giving CPR they probably don't need it.

ApatheticEnd
WA, 995 posts
22 Nov 2010 12:05AM
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Doesnt' sound like it was a kiting accident but cardiac arrest. That's so young to have heart trouble. Good effort to try to get him back to those that pitched in. I know it must be hard to know that he did pass but i'm sure his family would be most appreciative of your efforts.

Keep looking out for each other guys.

Beersy
TAS, 743 posts
22 Nov 2010 8:29AM
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chino said...

Big eeeZeee said...

hearing stories like this makes me want to brush up on my first aid course I did eons ago. They're always updating CPR method aren't they? Something everyone should look into i guess.

Rest in peace dude


Without going into too many details, the new consensus is not to bother with mouth to mouth or any artificial breathing, just apply compressions nice and hard until you get tired, then to get someone else to take over. The benefit of mouth to mouth is debatable and if anything it just turns bystanders off the prospect of helping.

Just make sure they don't have a pulse first! If they punch you in the face when you're giving CPR they probably don't need it.


I did my SFA in august, and their still teaching you to give breaths.
The current teaching is 30 compressions in 30 seconds, then two breaths.

Albos
VIC, 162 posts
22 Nov 2010 11:21AM
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when performing CPR if there are two people you can tag team with breathes and compression.

Compression should be done on the sternum and its quite normal to break ribs even when you do it correctly.

kbv
VIC, 415 posts
22 Nov 2010 11:30AM
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Posted today by Matt Jones to KBV and others:

On Friday the 19th of November 2010, Tristan Morrison, 28years of age suffered a massive heart attack while kiteboarding at West Beach St kilda which was caused by a surge of adrenalin. Unfortunately after being rushed to the Alfred Hospital by Ambulance Tristan passed away on Saturday night.

Tristan had been kiting for 2 years and he was an intermediate kiteboarder.

Tristan was from Queensland and his family came to Melbourne and they attended West Beach on Sunday to meet the local kiters and see where the incident took place. I passed on the kiting communities sympathies and suggested that a collection be organised and the family would like any donations to be forwarded to the Ambulance service.

Lance from Kite Republic met with the family after I had spoken with them and he spoke with the family at greater length and supplied them with the details that were known.

It is a tragic occurrence and it was a health issue that could not have been avoided. This situation hopefully raises health-related awareness to all kiteboarders and the community.

The Melbourne Kiteboarding Academy ( Matt Jones ) can be contacted for any further details if required on 0431 74522.

We wish the family all the best in this trying time.

Regards,

Matt Jones
Melbourne Kiteboarding Academy.

Saffer
VIC, 4415 posts
22 Nov 2010 11:35AM
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Albos said...

when performing CPR if there are two people you can tag team with breathes and compression.

Compression should be done on the sternum and its quite normal to break ribs even when you do it correctly.


It also may interest people to know that you can keep a person alive for a couple of hours even if they don't have a pulse so its not like you see on the movies where people try for 5 minutes and then throw a sheet over the person and give up. The blood circulation created by the chest compression is normally enough to prevent brain damage. If no one is around to tell you otherwise, just continue chest compressions until a paramedic tells you to stop, even if its an hour or two.

Albos
VIC, 162 posts
22 Nov 2010 12:49PM
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Saffer said...

Albos said...

when performing CPR if there are two people you can tag team with breathes and compression.

Compression should be done on the sternum and its quite normal to break ribs even when you do it correctly.


It also may interest people to know that you can keep a person alive for a couple of hours even if they don't have a pulse so its not like you see on the movies where people try for 5 minutes and then throw a sheet over the person and give up. The blood circulation created by the chest compression is normally enough to prevent brain damage. If no one is around to tell you otherwise, just continue chest compressions until a paramedic tells you to stop, even if its an hour or two.


Alot of the time the parametic will actually ask you to continue unless you are unable to keep going, while the get all their equipment out and monitor the person.

If you see someone colapse in the street, you do not have to help them even if you have first aid training. But if u do start you are then liable to contiune until either help arrives or you physically cannot help anymore

red
VIC, 707 posts
22 Nov 2010 1:58PM
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As a paramedic , the best thing someone can do in a situation like this is something.. anything. There are enough examples of people doing Chest compressions on the TV and media that most people who are not "officially" first aid trained will have a fair idea of what to do. Our dispatches instruct people how to do CPR over the phone.. Its not that hard.. BUT do something!! ...compression without ventilations is still better than nothing... remember push hard and push fast ... When we arrive keep going because bystander CPR frees one of us up to start doing Advanced life support (drugs, airway management ). Even though we might not show it - we appreciate it immensely! Well done to the fellow kiter for trying his best.

To the Kiter - RIP. All the condolences to his family..

Gorgo
VIC, 4188 posts
22 Nov 2010 6:12PM
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New CPR guidelines

www.google.com.au/search?aq=f&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=new+cpr

Easier to do.
More effective because you do the important stuff first.
Does not require mouth to mouth (especially difficult if it's stranger and/or a near dead person).

salt
VIC, 614 posts
23 Nov 2010 12:35PM
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It is very dangerous to be misinformed and publicly post: "don't bother with breathing", "can keep you alive a couple of hours".

I did a First aid course this week.

You can keep someone alive indefinitely with CPR. Someone had CPR performed on them for 12hrs. You Do Not Stop CPR until a medic/nurse/Dr arrives. Breaths and compressions will keep someone alive.
They will not be revived without a defibrillator. What you see in movies is false. Someone will not "wake up" with CPR alone.

30 compressions (2 compressions per second), 2 (1 second) breaths... continue


chino
VIC, 165 posts
23 Nov 2010 3:26PM
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salt said...

It is very dangerous to be misinformed and publicly post: "don't bother with breathing", "can keep you alive a couple of hours".

I did a First aid course this week.

You can keep someone alive indefinitely with CPR. Someone had CPR performed on them for 12hrs. You Do Not Stop CPR until a medic/nurse/Dr arrives. Breaths and compressions will keep someone alive.
They will not be revived without a defibrillator. What you see in movies is false. Someone will not "wake up" with CPR alone.

30 compressions (2 compressions per second), 2 (1 second) breaths... continue





Artificial breaths are being considered taken out of the standard CPR protocol for a number of reasons, the most important being that people are reluctant to help if it involves mouth to mouth. The most important thing is to keep circulation going. If you want to apply breaths, thats fine and will certainly do no harm to whoever you are helping. But applying compressions only is easier for many people and encourages them to help where they normally wouldn't. You're applying negative pressure to the lungs when you compress, which results in forced air entry into the lungs. Not to mention the air getting in is 21% oxygen (approx 120 mm Hg) vs mouth breaths, which may create higher inspiratory pressures, but are closer to 10% oxygen (70mm hg or less). This applies less if there is mechanical obstruction to the lungs (water, inhaled sputum, etc) in which case applying positive pressure is still indicated.

Applying compressions is hard. Proper compressions that create proper circulation need to be done at around 100 beats per minute (1.5 compressions a second). The average fit and healthy person can usually do it effectively for about 5 minutes before having to get someone else to come in and switch.

So yes, I stand by my original comment. If you want to help and are forced to do one thing and nothing else, apply compressions.

Down times over 10 minutes or more usually result in death. The biggest predictive factor of someone surviving an out-of-hospital arrest is the time it takes them to get to a defibrillator.


picker
VIC, 431 posts
26 Nov 2010 11:20AM
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Please respect what has happened here and not argue over CPR rates. If anything listen to the paramedic and people who have propper hands on experience. It's always amazing how many people will stand and stare. Be that a Kiter in trouble, wayward kite or someone suffering heart attack. If you want to talk rates put a new topic up please.

I hope people who whitnessed this and still have it on their mind talk to others - friends family kiters and the many support services out there for free like life line or beyond blue, its not being weak it's about moving on.

Take care

Drew



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"St Kilda serious accident this afternoon" started by ericmb