Forums > Sailing General

Old topic, new again. Which TS?

Reply
Created by SeaLice Monday, 2 Dec 2019
SeaLice
SA, 12 posts
Monday , 2 Dec 2019 9:52PM
Thumbs Up

I am of retiring age, and finally I do not have the constraints of time (time is on my side.......if only sightly deluded).
I have tried a 24' trimaran, which turned out to be awkward pulling off the water , ramps are not wide enough nor I am not able to run up front on a trampoline. I gather marina too would be difficult. I really enjoyed motoring my TS 12, as I am not keen to sail a dingy on my own. I had a TS18 which gave me a long and lovely time renovating.
I have decided to stop playing games and get a useful boat for a change.
I need a boat that will really be self righting, like a modified RL24 (with lots of extra ballast). Easy to rig like the NIS23, lovely interior as the Bonito 22, well behaved and cheap as the Austral 20. Small enough for single handling as an Ultimate 18. May be a Carell 18 although I believed it is cramped and small inside. My suffering wife has a preference for a larger, potentially safer boat! I really like the RL24, but not the accommodations (on which I could work on)!
Most likely I would be sailing alone, the boat will live on the hard at a marina/yacht club. I am intending on sailing the S.A. Golf regions and Kangaroo Island where I have a pied a-terre!
Is there another trailer sailer that I should be considering? I love the NIS but $ probably out of my league. One in Qld for 17k, but that my $ outer limit, and the tyranny of distance.

Bananabender
QLD, 820 posts
Monday , 2 Dec 2019 10:37PM
Thumbs Up

If your just at retiring age your only a youngun still
The RL 24 is a flyer and a handful for the not so expierenced.
OK what I would change in the three years with a Sonata 6.
You need a boat that is somewhat stable when having to go forward sailing solo ,wider sidedeck the better. A furling headsail is a must. An open transom is handy for boarding. Preference a boat with a lead keel. I have a swing lead antimony keel but I think a drop is more practical especially in older boats. Think about where the mainsheet traveller is fitted. If it dissects the cockpit think about how you will be able to handle the sheets and tiller . A pop top is really a plus . Waterproof Cockpit lockers a plus. Being such a young bloke it won't be the last boat so look at those that have a good reputation ,professional internal fitout and active association for resale . Eg Farr ,Noelex ,Sonata or even a Castle.
An outboard hanging off the transom is better that one that sits in a well as you have more flexibility when upgrading .
Internals are not my strongpoint however aside from the head being sectioned off somewhat the more open the better.
I have not gone into condition of boats .
The current cruising helmsman mag has a great check list for when buying a ts.

EC31
NSW, 420 posts
Tuesday , 3 Dec 2019 6:26AM
Thumbs Up

For different reasons to you, I recently purchased a Cole 23. Good room downstairs with the pop top (but I am not 6'), well made and easy to sail with the right choice of headsail, even single handed.
Apart from the condition of the boat, the 2 biggest things on my list were the trailer (near new fully gal) and the outboard (a 4 stroke, electric start with 60 hours). That is where the big dollars go.
There are 2 for sale at the moment and both look in good nick, but I haven't seen them.

www.boatsales.com.au/boats/cole/23/

slammin
QLD, 876 posts
Tuesday , 3 Dec 2019 5:49AM
Thumbs Up

Good point, you're buying a trailer foremost. If the trailer is cactus price a replacement..... $5k for a Chinese made one in that size.
The best boat and trailer in the best condition in your price bracket will make the most sense, rather than picking a design . I woulda thought a trip across to Vic would yield the best market. Have a look at trailersailerplace

Bananabender
QLD, 820 posts
Tuesday , 3 Dec 2019 6:11AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
EC31 said..
For different reasons to you, I recently purchased a Cole 23. Good room downstairs with the pop top (but I am not 6'), well made and easy to sail with the right choice of headsail, even single handed.
Apart from the condition of the boat, the 2 biggest things on my list were the trailer (near new fully gal) and the outboard (a 4 stroke, electric start with 60 hours). That is where the big dollars go.
There are 2 for sale at the moment and both look in good nick, but I haven't seen them.

www.boatsales.com.au/boats/cole/23/


The Cole is a good one with a bonus of it having a hydraulic keel .

Ramona
NSW, 5300 posts
Tuesday , 3 Dec 2019 7:45AM
Thumbs Up

Careel 22.

SeaLice
SA, 12 posts
Tuesday , 3 Dec 2019 8:38AM
Thumbs Up

Cole 23 ticks all the boxes. In good condition it may be at the top of my affordability (15K= purchase + inevitable updates on a 40-50 years old boat). Don't know much about Careel, except for its really intrusive centreboard. Doesn't appeal.
Sunmaid 20 has a traveller out of the way, next to the tiller, and it is a bit smaller, more manageable? and affordable. I believe it has a bit of a weather helm and rounds up readily. Is it a problem? Does anyone own or have sailed on one of these?
Although I like some aspect of the RL24, and is affordable, I can see that it is not a boat for me.

Yara
NSW, 922 posts
Tuesday , 3 Dec 2019 1:52PM
Thumbs Up

You missed my Investigator 563. Sold. Only 18'-6" but safe with a lead fixed keel. The Careel 22 is also OK self -righting wise, but has a heavy swing keel. Sunmaid is closer to the Investigator concept of the shallow lead fixed keel and light weight centreboard. Careel 18 is famous for "turtling" . Leave that for the youngsters.
Also depends on your tow vehicle. Check the max tow weight. Most safe T/S are more than 1200kg all up if you go above 18ft.

Achernar
QLD, 13 posts
Tuesday , 3 Dec 2019 1:34PM
Thumbs Up

I recently sold my Austral 20 and bought a Cavalier 28.

In future, if I were to move back to a trailer sailer on retirement, my advice to my future-self would be ...
* Its a buyers' market, so take a look at several boats
* See the boat in the flesh. Its a bit like trying on a pair of shoes. You can do it on the internet, but there is only one way to find if they fit.
* Buy local, because you should see the boat in the flesh, and travelling interstate is not good value for a $10K to $20K purchase. Also, the previous owner might be able to help out with various post-purchase niggles or tips and tricks.
* When it comes to 30-year old boats, the make and model is not as important as condition. So, don't narrow your search to a particular type of boat (e.g. RL24), but broaden it a little to a range (e.g. 20 to 25 ft)
* Look at the trailer first. If the trailer is cactus, walk away.
* Size and ease of rigging is more important than you might think.

Let's put some numbers to this last point
* If I recall, trailers above 2000kg need a breakaway braking system, which is extra cost and weight. As a rule of thumb, most twin axle trailers with 25ft boats (e.g. Noelex 25) would be in this range.
* You could get a lighter boat, but it will not be as sea-worthy. Its a trade-off. Heavier boats are better at handling heavy weather.
* Twin axle trailers are more difficult to maneouvre. A single-axle trailer is more nimble, but restricts you to the lighter boats, see above.
* The maximum beam, without needing "overload" constraints, is 2.5m. This restricts headroom to, typically, less than 6ft without a pop-top. I'm just under 6ft and the only trailer-sailer I've stood upright in is an RL28. There are other TS's that have full headroom, but they are heavy boats, see above.
* The maximum trailer length you can park on a road (for more than 1 hour) is 7.5m. I took some measurements earlier, and worked out that the maximum boat (plus trailer) that would fit into this constraint was about 22ft. And, that's ignoring the mast. A work-around would be a gaff rig, like the Cygnet 20 (carbon spars, and only available as a new build), but you might think twice about leaving a $70K (?) boat parked on the road.
* Do you actually need a cabin? Would you be OK with a cuddy-cabin or a tent? If you don't need a big cabin, then a large dingy could be the answer. e.g. an Amity dingy with a gaff rig.
* Enclosed heads are only found on the bigger, heavier boats, see above.

So, the answer is in the resolution of a number of compromises. I hope you find something that suits your needs best.

Bananabender
QLD, 820 posts
Tuesday , 3 Dec 2019 2:09PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Achernar said..
I recently sold my Austral 20 and bought a Cavalier 28.

In future, if I were to move back to a trailer sailer on retirement, my advice to my future-self would be ...
* Its a buyers' market, so take a look at several boats
* See the boat in the flesh. Its a bit like trying on a pair of shoes. You can do it on the internet, but there is only one way to find if they fit.
* Buy local, because you should see the boat in the flesh, and travelling interstate is not good value for a $10K to $20K purchase. Also, the previous owner might be able to help out with various post-purchase niggles or tips and tricks.
* When it comes to 30-year old boats, the make and model is not as important as condition. So, don't narrow your search to a particular type of boat (e.g. RL24), but broaden it a little to a range (e.g. 20 to 25 ft)
* Look at the trailer first. If the trailer is cactus, walk away.
* Size and ease of rigging is more important than you might think.

Let's put some numbers to this last point
* If I recall, trailers above 2000kg need a breakaway braking system, which is extra cost and weight. As a rule of thumb, most twin axle trailers with 25ft boats (e.g. Noelex 25) would be in this range.
* You could get a lighter boat, but it will not be as sea-worthy. Its a trade-off. Heavier boats are better at handling heavy weather.
* Twin axle trailers are more difficult to maneouvre. A single-axle trailer is more nimble, but restricts you to the lighter boats, see above.
* The maximum beam, without needing "overload" constraints, is 2.5m. This restricts headroom to, typically, less than 6ft without a pop-top. I'm just under 6ft and the only trailer-sailer I've stood upright in is an RL28. There are other TS's that have full headroom, but they are heavy boats, see above.
* The maximum trailer length you can park on a road (for more than 1 hour) is 7.5m. I took some measurements earlier, and worked out that the maximum boat (plus trailer) that would fit into this constraint was about 22ft. And, that's ignoring the mast. A work-around would be a gaff rig, like the Cygnet 20 (carbon spars, and only available as a new build), but you might think twice about leaving a $70K (?) boat parked on the road.
* Do you actually need a cabin? Would you be OK with a cuddy-cabin or a tent? If you don't need a big cabin, then a large dingy could be the answer. e.g. an Amity dingy with a gaff rig.
* Enclosed heads are only found on the bigger, heavier boats, see above.

So, the answer is in the resolution of a number of compromises. I hope you find something that suits your needs best.



I gathered from what he said he may even consider a yard trailer if the boat was good enough at the right price. ie. it will live on the hard at the YC.
Boats like the Sunmaid ( which are a solid boat) have the lead in the skeg
witha gal. Centreplate . Make very sure the centreplate is not rusted or swollen . More than one has had the centreplate jam in the keel box.

SeaLice
SA, 12 posts
Tuesday , 3 Dec 2019 6:25PM
Thumbs Up

Well, with regard to the Careel, I have indicated that I am not too keen. However when/if one Careel 22 is for sale in my area I will look it in the flesh.
My 4WD can tow 2T. So whithin reasons, I am not too limited.
My strongly working class yacht club (Small Boat Club off Garden Island) can be reached via a long tidal channel that is both narrow and shallow (1.4m at low tide). And yes, a good trailer is important, even so that it will mostly stay inside the club. I am not going to limit my options from the start. Someone said that in this size of boat I am interested in, it make little sense to choose a keel boat over a lifting keel! Except that there are a lot of good and cheap 30' keel boats around, but then the cost of upkeep is prohibitive. And there is limited access to the club!!
I take the point that I should look at a range within 20 to 25', the implication is that I should forego 18 footers. However looking at the specs and review for the Investigator 563, I am interested. Less can be more, and I like the shoal draft keel plus centerboard ala Wood 20/22. I accept that a low headroom is a trade off. You sit in a boat anyway, except in the companion way ( with a tent, pop-top etc...).
Noelex 25 is too heavy and expensive to purchase.
Living aboard for short stay , hence a semblance of comfort, is a requirement (retiring, not a widower!!!).
Next bit of advice is that I should look locally. I agree, although I am limited by the small South Australian market, compared to our Neighbours in Victoria. Should something really really interesting be showing in Vic, I might, err read; will, check it out (lov' shopping in Melbourne, in fact I love Melbourne)!!!! There is a Sunmaid for sale in Flinders Vic, if not sold within the next 6 weeks I might be able to look at. Asking $13000, if in good nick and with a bit of negotiation on the price, I might be able to purchase.
I will be looking at a couple of Austral 20 this week and a Bonito 22 Monday next (at $17000 the Bonito is really too expensive)
Looking at the drooping thingy, I think, is a must for this vintage of boats. This is why I am not keen on spending top dollars up front. Old electronics for a start is a bin job as far as I am concerned!

SandS
VIC, 5763 posts
Tuesday , 3 Dec 2019 7:40PM
Thumbs Up

sonata 6 or 7 , or cheaper/ older but the same boat nth wind 7 . or timpany !!! all great boats

All@Sea
TAS, 133 posts
Wednesday , 4 Dec 2019 2:32AM
Thumbs Up

The Farr range (to my understanding) sail well, are relatively spacious (with pop-top), and have a good reputation. The 7500s often go for high teens, and the smaller ones are cheaper. I sail my Elliott 7 single handed, but I wouldn't call it easy or relaxing a lot of the time!

All@Sea
TAS, 133 posts
Wednesday , 4 Dec 2019 5:54AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
All@Sea said..
The Farr range (to my understanding) sail well, are relatively spacious (with pop-top), and have a good reputation. The 7500s often go for high teens, and the smaller ones are cheaper. I sail my Elliott 7 single handed, but I wouldn't call it easy or relaxing a lot of the time!


yachthub.com/list/yachts-for-sale/used/sail-monohulls/farr-7500/239842

SeaLice
SA, 12 posts
Wednesday , 4 Dec 2019 7:24AM
Thumbs Up

Nice. However too Farr from me, too big and too expensive. No trailer (more $) and too heavy for me to tow .
I am getting more interested in the 20ish range as a compromise of space, weight and price, not to mention ease for single handedness!
I like popups and discreet centreboard cases. Hence shoal draft, bulb and drop keel or a very well designed interior. I might start reducing the scope of my search, while maybe increasing my overall purchase power from 10K to 15K (Aim at overall $20K cost).

Ramona
NSW, 5300 posts
Wednesday , 4 Dec 2019 8:43AM
Thumbs Up

For the type of sailing you envisage I would concentrate on the 20 to 24 foot range and not spend more than 10 grand all up. Apart from the Careel 22 the others I would look at are the Catalina 22 [often called by other names like Boomaroo]. Thousands of them around the world for good reason. Southern Cross 23 and in the smaller end the Sorcerer 20. There are a few Sorcerers around Adelaide and on the West Coast but most are in WA. There was one for sale at Goolwa recently. I don't see any on the market right now but they appear regularly. Basic interior but all that you need. Fixed keel versions are usually a couple of grand but lifting keel boats sell around the 5 grand mark.
That Bonito 22 is if I recall correctly a Catalina 22 built under license in Australia.
If I was to travel looking for a trailer sailer I would go to WA.

Achernar
QLD, 13 posts
Wednesday , 4 Dec 2019 2:07PM
Thumbs Up

SeaLice, the TrailerSailerPlace forum has regular updates on TS's for sale, here trailersailerplace.com.au/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=37&t=7719&start=14875

Also a good place to browse and ask questions.

SandS
VIC, 5763 posts
Wednesday , 4 Dec 2019 6:34PM
Thumbs Up

sonata 7, northwind 7, Southern Cross 23 all the same boat just different ages / versions..... lovely sailing boats

All@Sea
TAS, 133 posts
Wednesday , 4 Dec 2019 6:50PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
SeaLice said..
Nice. However too Farr from me, too big and too expensive. No trailer (more $) and too heavy for me to tow .
I am getting more interested in the 20ish range as a compromise of space, weight and price, not to mention ease for single handedness!
I like popups and discreet centreboard cases. Hence shoal draft, bulb and drop keel or a very well designed interior. I might start reducing the scope of my search, while maybe increasing my overall purchase power from 10K to 15K (Aim at overall $20K cost).



Keep an eye out for the Farr 6000s, often pop up for a good price. 6' headroom under pop top. Sail well. www.boatsales.com.au/boats/farr/6000/ Current list.... some of these look very well cared for, with good trailers aln lots of accessories... if I were in the market for a cruiser...

Madmouse
187 posts
Wednesday , 4 Dec 2019 5:57PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
All@Sea said..


SeaLice said..
Nice. However too Farr from me, too big and too expensive. No trailer (more $) and too heavy for me to tow .
I am getting more interested in the 20ish range as a compromise of space, weight and price, not to mention ease for single handedness!
I like popups and discreet centreboard cases. Hence shoal draft, bulb and drop keel or a very well designed interior. I might start reducing the scope of my search, while maybe increasing my overall purchase power from 10K to 15K (Aim at overall $20K cost).





Keep an eye out for the Farr 6000s, often pop up for a good price. 6' headroom under pop top. Sail well. www.boatsales.com.au/boats/farr/6000/ Current list.... some of these look very well cared for, with good trailers aln lots of accessories... if I were in the market for a cruiser...



Yes the farr 6000 is tegarded as a sweet spot in that size range.

If you plan to do coastal hops the bigger the better.

All@Sea
TAS, 133 posts
Wednesday , 4 Dec 2019 10:49PM
Thumbs Up

This is a great resource for trailer sailers... johncrawfordmarine.com.au/trailer-sailer

SeaLice
SA, 12 posts
Thursday , 5 Dec 2019 7:17AM
Thumbs Up

The sonata 7 comes up a lot. It seems that it is every body's favourite. But there is a drought of them in SA at present.
Today, I will look at a left field one, a Young 6, as well as an Adams 21, a cheap Austral 20 5k, which many people told me to avoid (too cramped, smallish), and a well fitted Blazer 740 Mk1 but at around 16k?
Apart from the name, I don't know much about the Adams.
I am told the Coles 23 tends to round up when overpowered, hence require many sail changes, which is not too family friendly. Also the Sunmaid 20 dies in light wind, again not really what I want. So I am narrowing the favourites to Sonata 7 and derivatives (N'wind, Sthcross, and Catalina 22 derivatives (Boomaroo, Bonito).
Can anyone enlighten me on the merit or otherwise of the Adams. I like the concept, the stability and the lack of intrusion in the cabin. The one I will be looking at, is from a dealer, looks good but pretty bare for $7500ono.
What does anyone think about it?
Thank you for all the comments so far, hugely helpful...

Ramona
NSW, 5300 posts
Thursday , 5 Dec 2019 8:55AM
Thumbs Up

You seem to be jumping about a bit here! Is the Adams 21 the aluminum version? The Sonata 7 is a really big boat as is the Blazer and I think they are too big to be referred to as trailer sailers. The ones I sailed against years ago always had 4 or 5 in the crew! I crewed on a Young 6 for a season and we raced 2 up against a Sonata 7 and several other trailer sailers including a Blazer.
www.seabreeze.com.au/forums/Sailing/General/6m-young?page=1
A mate of mine has owned a Cole 23 for quite a few years and has yet to put it in the water! The Cole 23 is a well-built boat but was designed when IOR yacht design set the fashion for some trailer sailers. It's a headsail driven yacht whereas a trailer sailer needs to be mainsail driven. Your wife will not enjoy dancing about on the foredeck! The problem with trailer sailers is the handling around boat ramps, off and on the trailer, how hard are they to control in a cross wind while the wife fetches the trailer. Or how deep the wife has to be in holding the boat while you get the trailer. The club I raced at had a wharf alongside the boat ramp and the large trailer sailers were controlled with stern ropes to get them on the trailer but still needed extra hands to assist. This is the major reason I'm sure why there are so many trailer sailers rotting in yacht club parking spots around the country.
I would suggest taking your time with this purchase.

Bananabender
QLD, 820 posts
Thursday , 5 Dec 2019 8:33AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Ramona said..
You seem to be jumping about a bit here! Is the Adams 21 the aluminum version? The Sonata 7 is a really big boat as is the Blazer and I think they are too big to be referred to as trailer sailers. The ones I sailed against years ago always had 4 or 5 in the crew! I crewed on a Young 6 for a season and we raced 2 up against a Sonata 7 and several other trailer sailers including a Blazer.
www.seabreeze.com.au/forums/Sailing/General/6m-young?page=1


You sure your not confusing the Sonata 7 with the Sonata 8 .
The 7 masthead <23 feet long . The 8 Fractional 26 feet long . Shaggy raced one I think.
www.sonatayacht.com/our-boats/
www.sonatayacht.com/history-of-the-sonata-yacht-association-of-victoria-inc-s-y-a-v/
Agree re masthead v fractional but you get around that by have a furling headsail ,unless of course you want to race.

Yara
NSW, 922 posts
Thursday , 5 Dec 2019 10:09AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Ramona said..
You seem to be jumping about a bit here! Is the Adams 21 the aluminum version? The Sonata 7 is a really big boat as is the Blazer and I think they are too big to be referred to as trailer sailers. The ones I sailed against years ago always had 4 or 5 in the crew! I crewed on a Young 6 for a season and we raced 2 up against a Sonata 7 and several other trailer sailers including a Blazer.
www.seabreeze.com.au/forums/Sailing/General/6m-young?page=1
A mate of mine has owned a Cole 23 for quite a few years and has yet to put it in the water! The Cole 23 is a well-built boat but was designed when IOR yacht design set the fashion for some trailer sailers. It's a headsail driven yacht whereas a trailer sailer needs to be mainsail driven. Your wife will not enjoy dancing about on the foredeck! The problem with trailer sailers is the handling around boat ramps, off and on the trailer, how hard are they to control in a cross wind while the wife fetches the trailer. Or how deep the wife has to be in holding the boat while you get the trailer. The club I raced at had a wharf alongside the boat ramp and the large trailer sailers were controlled with stern ropes to get them on the trailer but still needed extra hands to assist. This is the major reason I'm sure why there are so many trailer sailers rotting in yacht club parking spots around the country.
I would suggest taking your time with this purchase.


Ramona is spot on with regard to the launch/retrieve. Possible without a helper, but difficult in cross wind conditions. Again, single handed you need the long pontoon next to the ramp, or a nice beach that you can walk the boat to the ramp from, after you have fetched the trailer from the car park. A good crew makes the world of difference!

SeaLice
SA, 12 posts
Thursday , 5 Dec 2019 10:57AM
Thumbs Up

Ramona, I listen to what you said, concentrate on 20 to 24 foot boats. Which is what I am doing. With the Sonata 7 I reflected on what many people's opinion were. I personally would be more comfy with the 6.3 version, specially with regard to standing height and size.
The Young surely cannot be considered big, nor heavy, and with water ballast at 60% of empty displacement, this should make it a fairly safe boat?
However, because I require shallow draft, I am looking at TS only, and being on the hard (mast up!). Should this give me launching grief, I would consider a marina birth (not that expensive) and deal with the extra in-water maintenance. I am not too fussed!
Someone said for what I am considering to do, some coastal and some rough water off KI as well, I would be better of with a slightly bigger and heavier boat. My main concern is can I manage it on my own, solo... That why a simple boat like a Norwalk Island 23 (NIS23) appeals to me. However price wise, they are out of my league, except perhaps that chicky one for sale @Mermaid. I would like to stay around 10K of purchase price if I may.
As for fractional vs .. , I must admit I had not thought about it. Good point, thank you.
I shall enter into more rumination now...

Yara
NSW, 922 posts
Thursday , 5 Dec 2019 1:27PM
Thumbs Up

We are going round in circles. If you are OK with a marina berth, then you can get a good solid keelboat that will take you in safety to K island. And 10k will get you a decent one around 25 to 27 ft.
Tell us about a pied a terre on the island. Sounds great. Might even make SA a place to be for retirees.

Achernar
QLD, 13 posts
Thursday , 5 Dec 2019 1:05PM
Thumbs Up

Regarding Masthead rigs and furlers on Trailer Sailers - I put a furler on my Austral 20. Made it much easier to handle solo. I left it on for the mast raising/lowering, and found it to be heavy and fragile. It was too heavy for me to lift the mast and furler on my own. I had mast-up storage, so didn't get the mast up or down very often. When I did need to get it up and down, I used a home-made A frame.

See my blog here theboattinkerer.blogspot.com/2018/06/episode-18-pole-son-of-pole-and-twin.html

SandS
VIC, 5763 posts
Thursday , 5 Dec 2019 6:36PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
SeaLice said..
Ramona, I listen to what you said, concentrate on 20 to 24 foot boats. Which is what I am doing. With the Sonata 7 I reflected on what many people's opinion were. I personally would be more comfy with the 6.3 version, specially with regard to standing height and size.
The Young surely cannot be considered big, nor heavy, and with water ballast at 60% of empty displacement, this should make it a fairly safe boat?
However, because I require shallow draft, I am looking at TS only, and being on the hard (mast up!). Should this give me launching grief, I would consider a marina birth (not that expensive) and deal with the extra in-water maintenance. I am not too fussed!
Someone said for what I am considering to do, some coastal and some rough water off KI as well, I would be better of with a slightly bigger and heavier boat. My main concern is can I manage it on my own, solo... That why a simple boat like a Norwalk Island 23 (NIS23) appeals to me. However price wise, they are out of my league, except perhaps that chicky one for sale @Mermaid. I would like to stay around 10K of purchase price if I may.
As for fractional vs .. , I must admit I had not thought about it. Good point, thank you.
I shall enter into more rumination now...


Which ever boat you decide to buy , if it has a movable keel make sure it has , or you fit a lock down system to the keel so in the advent of a knock down your keel stays in the down position where it needs to be !!
Or now you say you dont mind about keeping in the water , you would be way better buying a fixed keel yacht . Especially for around KI and ocean work like that . you will get more boat for you buck too !! Way better to have a bit of weight in the open water ...

515
338 posts
Thursday , 5 Dec 2019 4:33PM
Thumbs Up

I'm biased as I used to race the original Bull 7m with Greg Young on the helm. Generally race 3 up and good performance while being easy to sail and plenty of internal room.
sailboatdata.com/sailboat/bull-7000

AUS126
NSW, 110 posts
Thursday , 5 Dec 2019 8:36PM
Thumbs Up

Lots of great info in this thread. My 2 cents:
As Ramona said, rigging and launching is a pain.
Go for the simplest and lightest rig possible. Same with the boat - not too big and heavy.
Trailer is very important. You want a trailer that is low to the ground and set up so you can just drive the boat on and off it. Often there is no finger pontoon, and man handling anything more than a Hartley 16 in a cross wind is near impossible on your own.
Big pop tops are great. You don't wan't to be crouched over all the time.
Make sure it's practical to have a bimini.
Spend the money on a good boat. You will get it back when you sell it.



Subscribe
Reply

Forums > Sailing General


"Old topic, new again. Which TS?" started by SeaLice