Forums > Stand Up Paddle General

Is there SUP surf life after a CABG?

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Created by bobajob 28 days ago, 22 Mar 2021
bobajob
QLD, 1452 posts
22 Mar 2021 9:40AM
Thumbs Up

Not to take away from Creek's thread at all, but this is also related to age, but the issues that go with getting older and the past catching up. I'm only a young pup at 54 and would like to think I will still be sup surfing at 73!

I was wondering if there was anyone here has who has undergone coronary bypass surgery and returned to sup after the operation, how difficult or otherwise the journey was. The surgeons and physio's seen to think once the breast bone heals, about three months, I should be able to gradually resume normal duties after building strength and confidence. I don't think they quite understand how physical and demanding SUP is in the surf.

At the beginning of December, I had a stent put in and was told in three months I would go for bypass surgery. Almost elective surgery as the stent relieved a major blockage but there is disease in the other arteries, hence the need for the bypass. I have been out of the water and off work for about 3 months and am booked in for next week. (not something I've been looking forward to). After I had the stent put in, I started walking and soon built that up to about 8Ks a day, so keeping fit.

The diet has changed, no more chocolate, ice cream, salty foods or beers - Wow, I've lost some weight! I understand I should probably start gradually in flat water and build up to small surf and then progress as strength and confidence dictate, but has anyone here gone through the experience and have any words of advice and wisdom they wish to share when returning to the surf after a CABG?

russh
SA, 2977 posts
22 Mar 2021 12:56PM
Thumbs Up

Hey BBJ - 3 years ago this week had the chest cracked open, plumbing rearranged and they tinkered with me ticker (similar age).

Was back on the water after around 4 months and it took a bit of time to get muscle strength & full fitness back and also to feel confident I wasn't going top smash the sternum or head - I wave sail, surf and sup most days since.

A few things - the sternum is the slowest and it's high risk if it doesn't knit so be guided by the rehab staff / medico's about activities and how it feels - be patient.
If you've ever broken a rib - you'll know that sneezing is not an option (unless you like passing out with pain ) - Deep breathing and coughing is vital (get a good pillow) and make sure you get all 3 balls floating...... you'll see
Take really good care of your surgical wounds when you go home - infected sternums are a nightmare.
I had the L) radial artery graft (instead of leg vein) - thought my arm would be as weak as a kitten but its difficult to notice the difference except the daily reminder of the scar from elbow to wrist - and cold fingers in winter sailing

Consider an impact vest and a helmet for a while when you get back on the water - if you are on some serious (ticagralor or the like) anti platelet meds - a knock on the head can have some life threatening bleeding outcomes. Do as much rehab exercise as you can - remember the rehab plan is for all - including 80+ year olds so get tailored plan to your needs. Drop the pain heavy relievers as soon as you can and get a good pillow to lay on if your a side sleeper until the sternum heals (6 weeks sleeping on your back is a nightmare).

Good luck and remember everyone will have a different experience and this was mine - so all I can say is hang in there and do the rehab - hopefully you'll be off the water for less time than the average knee recon.

bigmc
NSW, 191 posts
22 Mar 2021 1:30PM
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A mate of mine had a quadruple bypass in early December. About 52. He is now back prone surfing and feeling good. Said it was a little tender around the breastbone at first but didn't last long. I think he has been out on his SUP as well but not sure. After his experience I really need to fix myself up. I am 14 years older and in worse condition plus intermittent AF. Hope this makes you a bit more at ease.

bobajob
QLD, 1452 posts
22 Mar 2021 1:33PM
Thumbs Up

Thanks russh,
I've been told by the cardio rehab center here to contact them once I'm out of hospital to get that ball rolling down the road to the 3 ball floating trick and recovery.

But I do have one question about the pillow for side sleeping, I haven't heard of that before, where do you put that? And they are going to "harvest" a vein from my left radial and divert an artery in my chest wall which I've heard can lead to a bit of pain there as well.

I'm a bit jealous of the people that get it done in one go, although they must possibly be in a more dire condition than me, but if I got it all done in early December when I had the stent put in, I'd be pretty much recovered by now with an eye on getting back into the surf.

russh
SA, 2977 posts
22 Mar 2021 2:45PM
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Select to expand quote
bobajob said..
Thanks russh,
I've been told by the cardio rehab center here to contact them once I'm out of hospital to get that ball rolling down the road to the 3 ball floating trick and recovery.

But I do have one question about the pillow for side sleeping, I haven't heard of that before, where do you put that? And they are going to "harvest" a vein from my left radial and divert an artery in my chest wall which I've heard can lead to a bit of pain there as well.

I'm a bit jealous of the people that get it done in one go, although they must possibly be in a more dire condition than me, but if I got it all done in early December when I had the stent put in, I'd be pretty much recovered by now with an eye on getting back into the surf.




Yeah - pillow on mattress and then lay on / over it - I like sleeping on my front so it took weight off the sternum as my back was getting sore.

The Internal Mammary Artery (IMA)- you get a funny numbness / tingling in the left chest and neck / shoulder - that is still there today from time to time and a low sensitivity when you touch the skin upper chest. Arterial - Thumb on L hand was numb for a while but returned to normal after a few months (nerve is affected) - do get a bit of arm pump and a weird bulge along the scar when windsurfing in winter / long arm steamer. My understanding is on younger patients with strong ulna arterial supply the Radial is harvested as it is larger, not as prone to collapse and should last longer - surgeon preference and suitability will be key in their decision. I had a fully clogged LAD - a walking time bomb but had good a collateral circulation so no chest pain or any other major sign just the odd palpitation episodes when hitting max effort surfing or sailing. Big family history (both sides) so it was for me it was a matter of when not if.

Good luck - I was Kacking my dacks for the week before surgery - but as they said - hey we do it every day so we're pretty good at it!!

teachmeanatomy.info/thorax/organs/heart/heart-vasculature/
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3689049/
www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmoa1716026

rockmagnet
QLD, 1437 posts
23 Mar 2021 7:35AM
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Heart disease is reversible simple by changing your diet and lifestyle. Depending on the amount of blockage in your arteries , you should be able to diet and medicate your way out of your heart disease. If you are on your feet and moving then the heart can be fixed by diet and medication alone. Check out what Dr Michael Greger and Joel Fuhrman have to say about it on Youtube.(two of the worlds leading experts on dietary health.)
I had bypass surgery 5 years ago 3 months after a high impact surfing accident at the age of 67. Had 60% blockage of the LAD (widow maker artery) I was fit, walking around ,exercising surfing and did not feel sick after mild heart attack but the surgeon told me I needed surgery. I found out later that I could have dieted and medicated my way out of it without surgery. Remember surgeons cut for a living. I was given no alternative advice .
Give yourself some time , eat only plant based food ,no meat eggs or dairy, cut out the oil, salt, junk food ,sugar and eat lots of veg, greens and beans, fruit and nuts. The only supplement needed is B12.
It's s big ask but it's better than open heart surgery which will change your life forever. Listen to your body.
Get a second opinion from qualified doctors who use diet and lifestyle for healing.
Hope this helps
Mike.

PS Your body and health will start to change days after starting a life saving diet. It changed mine to the point that I take no tablets or medication at all .
Good luck.

Gboots
NSW, 1119 posts
23 Mar 2021 10:46AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
rockmagnet said..
Heart disease is reversible simple by changing your diet and lifestyle. Depending on the amount of blockage in your arteries , you should be able to diet and medicate your way out of your heart disease. If you are on your feet and moving then the heart can be fixed by diet and medication alone. Check out what Dr Michael Greger and Joel Fuhrman have to say about it on Youtube.(two of the worlds leading experts on dietary health.)
I had bypass surgery 5 years ago 3 months after a high impact surfing accident at the age of 67. Had 60% blockage of the LAD (widow maker artery) I was fit, walking around ,exercising surfing and did not feel sick after mild heart attack but the surgeon told me I needed surgery. I found out later that I could have dieted and medicated my way out of it without surgery. Remember surgeons cut for a living. I was given no alternative advice .
Give yourself some time , eat only plant based food ,no meat eggs or dairy, cut out the oil, salt, junk food ,sugar and eat lots of veg, greens and beans, fruit and nuts. The only supplement needed is B12.
It's s big ask but it's better than open heart surgery which will change your life forever. Listen to your body.
Get a second opinion from qualified doctors who use diet and lifestyle for healing.
Hope this helps
Mike.

PS Your body and health will start to change days after starting a life saving diet. It changed mine to the point that I take no tablets or medication at all .
Good luck.


Great post. Love your approach . Pre covid i was going ok but have slackened with lack of exercise and too much alchohol. Major hereditary heart issues in my family so I should be very alert

russh
SA, 2977 posts
23 Mar 2021 1:05PM
Thumbs Up




An old graph from a current paper on SCD. You have to make the changes in your 20-30's to really have a significant impact - and unless you have some sort of an episode or heart scan / angio most of use will never know what is happening in our arteries.

Dead men don't post about miracle recoveries from diet or their near death surgical experiences.

www.heartlungcirc.org/article/S1443-9506(18)31905-X/pdf#:~:text=Other%20reports%20in%20Australia%20have,100%2C000%20%5B13%2C14%5D.

bobajob
QLD, 1452 posts
23 Mar 2021 3:06PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
rockmagnet said..
Heart disease is reversible simple by changing your diet and lifestyle. Depending on the amount of blockage in your arteries , you should be able to diet and medicate your way out of your heart disease. If you are on your feet and moving then the heart can be fixed by diet and medication alone. Check out what Dr Michael Greger and Joel Fuhrman have to say about it on Youtube.(two of the worlds leading experts on dietary health.)
I had bypass surgery 5 years ago 3 months after a high impact surfing accident at the age of 67. Had 60% blockage of the LAD (widow maker artery) I was fit, walking around ,exercising surfing and did not feel sick after mild heart attack but the surgeon told me I needed surgery. I found out later that I could have dieted and medicated my way out of it without surgery. Remember surgeons cut for a living. I was given no alternative advice .
Give yourself some time , eat only plant based food ,no meat eggs or dairy, cut out the oil, salt, junk food ,sugar and eat lots of veg, greens and beans, fruit and nuts. The only supplement needed is B12.
It's s big ask but it's better than open heart surgery which will change your life forever. Listen to your body.
Get a second opinion from qualified doctors who use diet and lifestyle for healing.
Hope this helps
Mike.

PS Your body and health will start to change days after starting a life saving diet. It changed mine to the point that I take no tablets or medication at all .
Good luck.


Thanks Mike, this very question I have asked of my doctor, the cardio and several dietitians. All have said If I had made the changes earlier in life I probably wouldn't be in the position I'm in now, and all that diet can do is help prevent further damage. I think the basic premise of their response is if I were to stop the meds and not go through with surgery is; make sure your life insurance is good and your will is done. They certainly don't need my business. Infact my surgery has been delayed because business is booming right now.

I have 100% changed my diet, eat a lot more fruit and veg, nuts and grains, no salt, sugar, alcohol and read labels on everything. I have even given up coffee because it tastes like crap without sugar. Being off work at the moment I can invest time in eating well.
And while the directive is to not surf at the moment, I am walking about 7-8ks every day (weather permitting). I've been at this for 3-4 months and I feel great.

I had a 100% blockage of the LAD, now stented, and there is still an 80%, 70% and 40% blockage in other arteries. I am certainly not looking forward to surgery. I do love the idea that diet can reverse the damage, but am not going to gamble my life on it. In fact everything I read about fruit, veg, nuts and every healthy food item is that it "may" help in "the prevention" of.

Mike, thanks for taking the time to reply, I want to believe it I really do. But.......

rockmagnet
QLD, 1437 posts
23 Mar 2021 7:24PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
bobajob said..

rockmagnet said..
Heart disease is reversible simple by changing your diet and lifestyle. Depending on the amount of blockage in your arteries , you should be able to diet and medicate your way out of your heart disease. If you are on your feet and moving then the heart can be fixed by diet and medication alone. Check out what Dr Michael Greger and Joel Fuhrman have to say about it on Youtube.(two of the worlds leading experts on dietary health.)
I had bypass surgery 5 years ago 3 months after a high impact surfing accident at the age of 67. Had 60% blockage of the LAD (widow maker artery) I was fit, walking around ,exercising surfing and did not feel sick after mild heart attack but the surgeon told me I needed surgery. I found out later that I could have dieted and medicated my way out of it without surgery. Remember surgeons cut for a living. I was given no alternative advice .
Give yourself some time , eat only plant based food ,no meat eggs or dairy, cut out the oil, salt, junk food ,sugar and eat lots of veg, greens and beans, fruit and nuts. The only supplement needed is B12.
It's s big ask but it's better than open heart surgery which will change your life forever. Listen to your body.
Get a second opinion from qualified doctors who use diet and lifestyle for healing.
Hope this helps
Mike.

PS Your body and health will start to change days after starting a life saving diet. It changed mine to the point that I take no tablets or medication at all .
Good luck.



Thanks Mike, this very question I have asked of my doctor, the cardio and several dietitians. All have said If I had made the changes earlier in life I probably wouldn't be in the position I'm in now, and all that diet can do is help prevent further damage. I think the basic premise of their response is if I were to stop the meds and not go through with surgery is; make sure your life insurance is good and your will is done. They certainly don't need my business. Infact my surgery has been delayed because business is booming right now.

I have 100% changed my diet, eat a lot more fruit and veg, nuts and grains, no salt, sugar, alcohol and read labels on everything. I have even given up coffee because it tastes like crap without sugar. Being off work at the moment I can invest time in eating well.
And while the directive is to not surf at the moment, I am walking about 7-8ks every day (weather permitting). I've been at this for 3-4 months and I feel great.

I had a 100% blockage of the LAD, now stented, and there is still an 80%, 70% and 40% blockage in other arteries. I am certainly not looking forward to surgery. I do love the idea that diet can reverse the damage, but am not going to gamble my life on it. In fact everything I read about fruit, veg, nuts and every healthy food item is that it "may" help in "the prevention" of.

Mike, thanks for taking the time to reply, I want to believe it I really do. But.......


Stay lean - and and a little bit hungry.

lam
VIC, 164 posts
25 Mar 2021 9:02AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
bobajob said..
Not to take away from Creek's thread at all, but this is also related to age, but the issues that go with getting older and the past catching up. I'm only a young pup at 54 and would like to think I will still be sup surfing at 73!

I was wondering if there was anyone here has who has undergone coronary bypass surgery and returned to sup after the operation, how difficult or otherwise the journey was. The surgeons and physio's seen to think once the breast bone heals, about three months, I should be able to gradually resume normal duties after building strength and confidence. I don't think they quite understand how physical and demanding SUP is in the surf.

At the beginning of December, I had a stent put in and was told in three months I would go for bypass surgery. Almost elective surgery as the stent relieved a major blockage but there is disease in the other arteries, hence the need for the bypass. I have been out of the water and off work for about 3 months and am booked in for next week. (not something I've been looking forward to). After I had the stent put in, I started walking and soon built that up to about 8Ks a day, so keeping fit.

The diet has changed, no more chocolate, ice cream, salty foods or beers - Wow, I've lost some weight! I understand I should probably start gradually in flat water and build up to small surf and then progress as strength and confidence dictate, but has anyone here gone through the experience and have any words of advice and wisdom they wish to share when returning to the surf after a CABG?


I would be very confident in listening to your medical experts, we enjoy one of the best health systems in the world. Our health experts are as good as any you will find in the world. I am sure you will return to supping and good health.
In your recovery use supping as your motivation, this will put you well ahead in the rehabs stakes. The joy you will have catching that first wave back will make it seem all worth while. All the best and start looking forward to your recovery.

rockmagnet
QLD, 1437 posts
25 Mar 2021 11:20AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
lam said..




bobajob said..
Not to take away from Creek's thread at all, but this is also related to age, but the issues that go with getting older and the past catching up. I'm only a young pup at 54 and would like to think I will still be sup surfing at 73!

I was wondering if there was anyone here has who has undergone coronary bypass surgery and returned to sup after the operation, how difficult or otherwise the journey was. The surgeons and physio's seen to think once the breast bone heals, about three months, I should be able to gradually resume normal duties after building strength and confidence. I don't think they quite understand how physical and demanding SUP is in the surf.

At the beginning of December, I had a stent put in and was told in three months I would go for bypass surgery. Almost elective surgery as the stent relieved a major blockage but there is disease in the other arteries, hence the need for the bypass. I have been out of the water and off work for about 3 months and am booked in for next week. (not something I've been looking forward to). After I had the stent put in, I started walking and soon built that up to about 8Ks a day, so keeping fit.

The diet has changed, no more chocolate, ice cream, salty foods or beers - Wow, I've lost some weight! I understand I should probably start gradually in flat water and build up to small surf and then progress as strength and confidence dictate, but has anyone here gone through the experience and have any words of advice and wisdom they wish to share when returning to the surf after a CABG?






I would be very confident in listening to your medical experts, we enjoy one of the best health systems in the world. Our health experts are as good as any you will find in the world. I am sure you will return to supping and good health.
In your recovery use supping as your motivation, this will put you well ahead in the rehabs stakes. The joy you will have catching that first wave back will make it seem all worth while. All the best and start looking forward to your recovery.





I would never ever doubt how good our Health system is in Australia nor the skills of the doctors and surgeons who practice , but take a look at this video to see another side of the story. And if you can, watch the insert as well . it's about an hour long but well worth it.



bobajob
QLD, 1452 posts
25 Mar 2021 12:25PM
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I think there is risk to any surgery, and when your receiving life saving surgery its a bit difficult to have a discussion with the cardio about percentages of failure of the procedure being performed. But having said that, my surgeon rewound the video of the op and showed me the before and after of the stent insertion, from zero blood flow at the 100% blocked LAD to blood flowing through it again.

Ideally it comes down to healthy habits from a young age, but as we all know we're all ten foot tall and bullet proof - until the day we find out we're not.

cbigsup
447 posts
25 Mar 2021 11:02AM
Thumbs Up

I had a sudden cardiac arrest a while back. Dead face down in the water. If my buddy had not noticed my disappearance I would be dead.

had an ICD installed. The threshold was low and a shock is like it a 220v hit from a dryer line.

No stents. I wear my a monitor and if things are getting interesting I get out of the water!

Diet was not an issue as I have been following a lacto vegetarian diet for many years.

Moved to Georgia from NE. Surfing in 34 degree water on Cape Cod was really stressful to say the least!

Higher Authority was extremely merciful. I am alive, had a glimpse of other dimensions and realities, and still surf as much as possible!

bobajob
QLD, 1452 posts
25 Mar 2021 3:37PM
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Select to expand quote
cbigsup said..
I had a sudden cardiac arrest a while back. Dead face down in the water. If my buddy had not noticed my disappearance I would be dead.

had an ICD installed. The threshold was low and a shock is like it a 220v hit from a dryer line.

No stents. I wear my a monitor and if things are getting interesting I get out of the water!

Diet was not an issue as I have been following a lacto vegetarian diet for many years.

Moved to Georgia from NE. Surfing in 34 degree water on Cape Cod was really stressful to say the least!

Higher Authority was extremely merciful. I am alive, had a glimpse of other dimensions and realities, and still surf as much as possible!


Wow, Geez your a lucky man to be found before permanent lights out!
Bloody electrics, always more tricky than plumbing issues. But its good to see these things are just a speed bump in the surfing adventure and that there is definitely life after these major events.

In the lead up to my event, I was out surfing with the daughter when I felt another of those 'overworked' in the chest feelings after paddling out with her, which at the time I thought was just being unfit and getting old. It would subside when I rested for a bit, but return again when exerting myself again. So I could have had a fatal event right infront of her.
It was the fact that these events were happening during exertion and starting to annoy me that I thought I should see a doctor and get to the bottom of it.

So if I can make it to Creeks age and still be surfing with that level of enthusiasm, that will be gold.

spw
NSW, 1 posts
27 Mar 2021 5:48AM
Thumbs Up

The phsycological barrier is one of the big hurdles to smash over. Take your time get the physical side fit and healthy again. Start of with flat water paddle to build up more fitness and strength in the right places. Go for the waves and life after the ground work is done.

russh
SA, 2977 posts
27 Mar 2021 12:32PM
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Select to expand quote
rockmagnet said..

lam said..





bobajob said..
Not to take away from Creek's thread at all, but this is also related to age, but the issues that go with getting older and the past catching up. I'm only a young pup at 54 and would like to think I will still be sup surfing at 73!

I was wondering if there was anyone here has who has undergone coronary bypass surgery and returned to sup after the operation, how difficult or otherwise the journey was. The surgeons and physio's seen to think once the breast bone heals, about three months, I should be able to gradually resume normal duties after building strength and confidence. I don't think they quite understand how physical and demanding SUP is in the surf.

At the beginning of December, I had a stent put in and was told in three months I would go for bypass surgery. Almost elective surgery as the stent relieved a major blockage but there is disease in the other arteries, hence the need for the bypass. I have been out of the water and off work for about 3 months and am booked in for next week. (not something I've been looking forward to). After I had the stent put in, I started walking and soon built that up to about 8Ks a day, so keeping fit.

The diet has changed, no more chocolate, ice cream, salty foods or beers - Wow, I've lost some weight! I understand I should probably start gradually in flat water and build up to small surf and then progress as strength and confidence dictate, but has anyone here gone through the experience and have any words of advice and wisdom they wish to share when returning to the surf after a CABG?







I would be very confident in listening to your medical experts, we enjoy one of the best health systems in the world. Our health experts are as good as any you will find in the world. I am sure you will return to supping and good health.
In your recovery use supping as your motivation, this will put you well ahead in the rehabs stakes. The joy you will have catching that first wave back will make it seem all worth while. All the best and start looking forward to your recovery.






I would never ever doubt how good our Health system is in Australia nor the skills of the doctors and surgeons who practice , but take a look at this video to see another side of the story. And if you can, watch the insert as well . it's about an hour long but well worth it.




Just something to think about as we all have personal opinions and prejudices on these subjects- This is American - I think you may find you don't get a Medicare payment for a stent in stable coronary artery disease. only in acute blockage with Stent or occlusive where stenting cannot be performed is funded - so unless someone diddles the books or you pay for a high risk procedure you probably won't have one for no reason. Item 38315 & 38306 Medicare Benefits.

The Stamford study also shows QOL improvement for severe angina symptomatic patients - 50% had no anginal pain post procedure for the intervention group VS 20% for the diet and medication. So if you take QOL into consideration there is a 30% improvement for those undergoing intervention and equal risk of all cause morbidity or mortality beyond 2 years - it's the flip of a coin and who knows what the correct thing is to do. This study did not apply to acute episodes of severe cardiac ischaemia - intervention save lives.

med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2019/11/invasive-heart-treatments-not-always-needed.html

CABG is not performed for stable coronary artery disease - with ongoing angina you're not going to be on the water SUPng any time soon and none of your mates will be keen if they think they're going to be giving your CPR next time you hit the water.

boundeast
123 posts
3 Apr 2021 9:02PM
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cbigsup said..
I had a sudden cardiac arrest a while back. Dead face down in the water. If my buddy had not noticed my disappearance I would be dead.

had an ICD installed. The threshold was low and a shock is like it a 220v hit from a dryer line.

No stents. I wear my a monitor and if things are getting interesting I get out of the water!

Diet was not an issue as I have been following a lacto vegetarian diet for many years.

Moved to Georgia from NE. Surfing in 34 degree water on Cape Cod was really stressful to say the least!

Higher Authority was extremely merciful. I am alive, had a glimpse of other dimensions and realities, and still surf as much as possible!



did your icd fire during the attack?
www.10tv.com/article/news/nation-world/shark-bites-surfers-paddle-board-cape-cod-beach/530-dfe1c84a-5c59-48d7-ac8f-59735b97f18a
apparently you tend to survive sh!t....
karma?

supthecreek
2182 posts
4 Apr 2021 2:32AM
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Select to expand quote
boundeast said..

cbigsup said..
I had a sudden cardiac arrest a while back. Dead face down in the water. If my buddy had not noticed my disappearance I would be dead.

had an ICD installed. The threshold was low and a shock is like it a 220v hit from a dryer line.

No stents. I wear my a monitor and if things are getting interesting I get out of the water!

Diet was not an issue as I have been following a lacto vegetarian diet for many years.

Moved to Georgia from NE. Surfing in 34 degree water on Cape Cod was really stressful to say the least!

Higher Authority was extremely merciful. I am alive, had a glimpse of other dimensions and realities, and still surf as much as possible!




did your icd fire during the attack?
www.10tv.com/article/news/nation-world/shark-bites-surfers-paddle-board-cape-cod-beach/530-dfe1c84a-5c59-48d7-ac8f-59735b97f18a
apparently you tend to survive sh!t....
karma?


Where I taught paddling, there was always a big black cat lounging in the sun....
I named him "Mr Big" after someone I know, who has used up many lives already


-----------------------

bobajob:
There is life, where the is life!!!
You will get there!
That's the beauty of breathing and striving..... our bodies are amazingly capable, if we get our minds out of the way!

Get strong, enjoy everything!!!!

cbigsup
447 posts
5 Apr 2021 9:13AM
Thumbs Up

No shock with the attack but the wave form was UNUSUAL and lasted for hours! My Cardiologist was not amused..

rockmagnet
QLD, 1437 posts
7 Apr 2021 7:43AM
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Select to expand quote
russh said..





rockmagnet said..






lam said..










bobajob said..
Not to take away from Creek's thread at all, but this is also related to age, but the issues that go with getting older and the past catching up. I'm only a young pup at 54 and would like to think I will still be sup surfing at 73!

I was wondering if there was anyone here has who has undergone coronary bypass surgery and returned to sup after the operation, how difficult or otherwise the journey was. The surgeons and physio's seen to think once the breast bone heals, about three months, I should be able to gradually resume normal duties after building strength and confidence. I don't think they quite understand how physical and demanding SUP is in the surf.

At the beginning of December, I had a stent put in and was told in three months I would go for bypass surgery. Almost elective surgery as the stent relieved a major blockage but there is disease in the other arteries, hence the need for the bypass. I have been out of the water and off work for about 3 months and am booked in for next week. (not something I've been looking forward to). After I had the stent put in, I started walking and soon built that up to about 8Ks a day, so keeping fit.

The diet has changed, no more chocolate, ice cream, salty foods or beers - Wow, I've lost some weight! I understand I should probably start gradually in flat water and build up to small surf and then progress as strength and confidence dictate, but has anyone here gone through the experience and have any words of advice and wisdom they wish to share when returning to the surf after a CABG?












I would be very confident in listening to your medical experts, we enjoy one of the best health systems in the world. Our health experts are as good as any you will find in the world. I am sure you will return to supping and good health.
In your recovery use supping as your motivation, this will put you well ahead in the rehabs stakes. The joy you will have catching that first wave back will make it seem all worth while. All the best and start looking forward to your recovery.











I would never ever doubt how good our Health system is in Australia nor the skills of the doctors and surgeons who practice , but take a look at this video to see another side of the story. And if you can, watch the insert as well . it's about an hour long but well worth it.









Just something to think about as we all have personal opinions and prejudices on these subjects- This is American - I think you may find you don't get a Medicare payment for a stent in stable coronary artery disease. only in acute blockage with Stent or occlusive where stenting cannot be performed is funded - so unless someone diddles the books or you pay for a high risk procedure you probably won't have one for no reason. Item 38315 & 38306 Medicare Benefits.

The Stamford study also shows QOL improvement for severe angina symptomatic patients - 50% had no anginal pain post procedure for the intervention group VS 20% for the diet and medication. So if you take QOL into consideration there is a 30% improvement for those undergoing intervention and equal risk of all cause morbidity or mortality beyond 2 years - it's the flip of a coin and who knows what the correct thing is to do. This study did not apply to acute episodes of severe cardiac ischaemia - intervention save lives.

med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2019/11/invasive-heart-treatments-not-always-needed.html

CABG is not performed for stable coronary artery disease - with ongoing angina you're not going to be on the water SUPng any time soon and none of your mates will be keen if they think they're going to be giving your CPR next time you hit the water.






Interesting follow up by Dr Michael Greger on his above video is that he distinguishes the difference between non profit hospitals in the US
and hospitals that are a business . There is a huge difference in unecessary cardiac surgery performed in the for profit hospitals. I wonder if the same is true in Australia and would patients who have private health cover influence their decisions.

bobajob
QLD, 1452 posts
10 Apr 2021 8:00AM
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Well I'm back! Five days in ICU to what seemed like the depths of hell including some of satans' tormentors, and another five in coranary care. No visitors due to covid lockdown. I wouldn't wish that experience on any one!

lam
VIC, 164 posts
10 Apr 2021 8:34PM
Thumbs Up

Recover well and quickly.



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"Is there SUP surf life after a CABG?" started by bobajob