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Pumping on wave

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Created by Kisutch 22 days ago, 6 Jul 2021
Kisutch
63 posts
6 Jul 2021 11:03AM
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How do you guys use pumping in your surfing and how do you do it? I ask cause I had a real breakthrough today, but I'm still not sure what I'm doing. Had to surf a weaker wave to stay out of wind and pumping just clicked like it hasn't before, could really accelerate down the line, it was so damn fun.

at first it felt like pumping transition on a skateboard- like I was just pushing up/down going down line as if there was an invisible pump track to press against, then I started doing more the tic tac thing with side-side worked in. I'm just doing this by feel and now that session is done I'm not sure if one way felt right on steeper wave and one flatter (the tic tac). Anyway would love to hear how you all approach this and if there are two different ways or if I'm misunderstanding what I'm doing.
thanks

surfinJ
560 posts
6 Jul 2021 1:45PM
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I think that there are two kinds of pump. The technique I mostly use feels like it does on my skateboard. When a long section presents itself and I need/want more speed I begin a slight turn up the steep wave face and the a slight turn back down grabbing a speed increase from the steepness. Repeating this across a steep section will generate more speed then if you had just trimmed through the section. And if not a steep section the method will work anytime there is a bit of a slope.
The other pump is the shortboarder hop. That is the unweighting and the pressing down of the front foot while going straight. Sometimes if I seem to get hung up near the top of the wave this will help to unglue the board to get going. Usually just one or two pumps and it's good.

If trying to max the energy on a weak wave section maybe a bit of both. A nice tool either way.

515
608 posts
6 Jul 2021 5:23PM
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Definitely pump when on flatter section more up down on fat wave.
Also up and down wave face - all depends on the wave and your read of it.
Most spots don't need to but some spots a few pumps gives you speed to set up better turns.
More intuitive surfing getting speed than paddle strokes when on the wave

Hoppo3228
VIC, 459 posts
6 Jul 2021 9:12PM
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Fins matter here, side to side pumping needs side fins to work... if surfing with a single fin it won't...

Kisutch
63 posts
7 Jul 2021 3:40AM
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Thanks for feedback, I was on L Quobba sides M center.

colas
4267 posts
7 Jul 2021 12:59PM
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Select to expand quote
Kisutch said..
I had a real breakthrough today, but I'm still not sure what I'm doing.




Welcome to the club!

Once you feel it, it is unmistakable, and it becomes easier to reproduce. And it is very similar to the one in skating when wheels stay on the ground.

Basically you need:
- traction: the fins must be in laminar flow, not stalling, they should feel rock hard when pushing on them. So you must go fast enough. You can pump a single fin, but the board must be nimble enough to allow for quick small turns via the rails: short length and curved outline. Twin fins are the easiest to pump. And Quobbas help a lot :-)
- quick movements, very limited in scope. Think of a fish trying to "pump" its rear fin

There are quite a bit of info on the net, look for "surfing pumping". But the hardest part is to get the first "clicking in place".

LastSupper
VIC, 295 posts
7 Jul 2021 9:02PM
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Id rather not pump

Kisutch
63 posts
8 Jul 2021 6:25AM
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colas said..

Kisutch said..
I had a real breakthrough today, but I'm still not sure what I'm doing.





Welcome to the club!

Once you feel it, it is unmistakable, and it becomes easier to reproduce. And it is very similar to the one in skating when wheels stay on the ground.

Basically you need:
- traction: the fins must be in laminar flow, not stalling, they should feel rock hard when pushing on them. So you must go fast enough. You can pump a single fin, but the board must be nimble enough to allow for quick small turns via the rails: short length and curved outline. Twin fins are the easiest to pump. And Quobbas help a lot :-)
- quick movements, very limited in scope. Think of a fish trying to "pump" its rear fin

There are quite a bit of info on the net, look for "surfing pumping". But the hardest part is to get the first "clicking in place".


Thanks Colas! I was nerding out hard reading about pumping, asking friends who prone surf etc. and was having trouble mapping those explanations onto my prior experiences pumping on concrete and snow. But I love how with this maneuver you get such clear feedback on whether you're doing it right, get that feeling of gaining speed.

Kisutch
63 posts
8 Jul 2021 6:31AM
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LastSupper said..
Id rather not pump


I listened to a prone surfing podcast (surf mastery I think) about the value of staying the pocket to get speed rather than trying to make your own through pumping, but damn if it wasn't about the coolest feeling I've had yet to beat a closing section of wave with the speed from pumping. I'm used to the feeling of trying to hold a high line and trim for speed, I like this active feeling like your sprinting for it, also psyched it gives me something to work on in small surf or waves that stand up but take forever to break...

colas
4267 posts
8 Jul 2021 1:28PM
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Kisutch said..
damn if it wasn't about the coolest feeling I've had yet


Yes, the famous "Huntington Hop" that SurfingJ describes leaves you a dirty feeling:



(Named from Huntington beach where weak waves promoted its use)

But the real "laminar flow" pumped turns is really exhilarating. And you want to incorporate it in ALL your bottom turns (in the form of a well timed flexion + extension), it is the secret gateway to enhancing your surfing.

Also, managing it while surfing backside is quite a challenge...

Souwester
WA, 1198 posts
8 Jul 2021 3:13PM
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Sorry but not sorry - that Huntington Hop makes me feel ill!

supthecreek
2230 posts
10 Jul 2021 5:59PM
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Thanks for that last video by Barefoot Surf colas... finally, someone did it right!
that was the best explanation that I have ever seen, on how to pump down the line to build speed)

castawaycove
13 posts
11 Jul 2021 8:21PM
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Where does the paddle come into play?

colas
4267 posts
12 Jul 2021 12:54PM
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castawaycove said..
Where does the paddle come into play?



I guess we could add a third category of pumping: paddling.

Even uglier and less satisfying than the Hungtinton Hop ;-)

A laminar flow pumping is much more efficient and powerful than paddling. Legs are much more powerful than the arms. But it requires both a minimal speed, and some power in the wave. Paddling can be the only option on very weak wave sections.

At 1:48 you can see me first paddling to get enough speed, and then switching to "turning pumps"



surfinJ
560 posts
12 Jul 2021 1:40PM
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I do not think the paddle is part of any pumping action. It's all in your body. Trying to add the paddle will just throw off the coordinated moves needed to pump. And the ugly, if used excessively, hop pump - becomes a beautiful surf move if all you do is a 1 or 2 front foot hop to unglue yourself on a wave. With all the surf hitting you guys down under there I have been gorging on vids from the Superbank. One of the rippers, Mick Fanning is a pumper supreme. One of the fastest surfers I have seen, he uses a smooth pump beautifully.



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"Pumping on wave" started by Kisutch