Forums > Windsurfing Foiling

Great Jibe Tutorial

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Created by Paducah A week ago, 19 May 2020
Paducah
903 posts
19 May 2020 11:04PM
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For all of you us... struggling with jibes, Nicholas Goyard shows how to do one at 0:50 in this video.

Seriously, pretty awesome short vid

www.facebook.com/thomasgoyardwindsurfing/videos/271118897364921/

VCRWoody
83 posts
19 May 2020 11:24PM
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Thanks for the post that guy got Good skills, but its not really a one handed Gybe; he's also using the stick and the camera as a counter balance.

Paducah
903 posts
20 May 2020 9:30AM
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VCRWoody said..
Thanks for the post that guy got Good skills, but its not really a one handed Gybe; he's also using the stick and the camera as a counter balance.


I'm sure that makes it A LOT easier.

"that guy got Good skills" is the understatement of the day.

Cyber
100 posts
Thursday , 21 May 2020 4:07PM
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1st: I have yet to get out on the water with all my new windfoil gear to try it out, so have obviously no personal clue about level of difficulty.

But if already very good at power jibing, duck jibing and what have you on the classic windsurfing in a funboard, sinkerboard, waveboard setup, high wind and big waves. Are you then still saying that jibing on the windfoil in low wind and at near zero waves (like literally flat water) is more difficult?

As said, i truly have not yet even been out on a windfoil myself, so sorry for my ignorance. But looking at all the challenges involved in jibing around, then it does not appear to be any harder as when on classic windsurfing. The foil even keeps your board above the bumpy water surface during the jibe, but true, the longitudinal balance point needs to be kept in check...

(ready for the windfoiler's uproar! )

seanhogan
3141 posts
Thursday , 21 May 2020 4:25PM
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I honestly find it it easier to jibe on a foil than on a regular board.
Scarier but easier !

Subsonic
WA, 1978 posts
Thursday , 21 May 2020 6:23PM
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Cyber said..
1st: I have yet to get out on the water with all my new windfoil gear to try it out, so have obviously no personal clue about level of difficulty.

But if already very good at power jibing, duck jibing and what have you on the classic windsurfing in a funboard, sinkerboard, waveboard setup, high wind and big waves. Are you then still saying that jibing on the windfoil in low wind and at near zero waves (like literally flat water) is more difficult?

As said, i truly have not yet even been out on a windfoil myself, so sorry for my ignorance. But looking at all the challenges involved in jibing around, then it does not appear to be any harder as when on classic windsurfing. The foil even keeps your board above the bumpy water surface during the jibe, but true, the longitudinal balance point needs to be kept in check...

(ready for the windfoiler's uproar! )


I've seen well experienced windsurfers get their foil gybes going on free ride gear quite rapidly whilst learning.
For me being a slow learner on race foils, i'm finding its like learning to do planing gybes all over again. Lots of failing, but I'm slowly getting closer to making it through (No i've not made one yet).

Paducah
903 posts
Thursday , 21 May 2020 10:29PM
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Subsonic said..

I've seen well experienced windsurfers get their foil gybes going on free ride gear quite rapidly whilst learning.
For me being a slow learner on race foils, i'm finding its like learning to do planing gybes all over again. Lots of failing, but I'm slowly getting closer to making it through (No i've not made one yet).


The swing weight issue with bigger sails is real. I can jibe all day with smaller stuff and the sail somehow makes it around. If I get lazy or don't pay attention with the bigger gear, the swing of the sail is very unsettling 50cm off the water.

Cyber, it's not so much hard for an experienced windsurfer as different. For example, if you are step jiber, you have to relearn where to step. You may need to adjust how and when to open the sail and how much foot pressure it takes to carve the board. Plus, all this takes place 50cm off the water so you have to pay attention to your height as well. Some people pick it up quickly but I've got friends who are solid regular jibers who are struggling a bit with it. It may be that I live in a low wind area so we are all trying to learn with bigger sails.

Once you've adapted, though, I would agree with seanhogan that it's easier to do consistently and to exit with speed.

Cyber
100 posts
Friday , 22 May 2020 7:50AM
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Paducah said..

Subsonic said..

I've seen well experienced windsurfers get their foil gybes going on free ride gear quite rapidly whilst learning.
For me being a slow learner on race foils, i'm finding its like learning to do planing gybes all over again. Lots of failing, but I'm slowly getting closer to making it through (No i've not made one yet).



The swing weight issue with bigger sails is real. I can jibe all day with smaller stuff and the sail somehow makes it around. If I get lazy or don't pay attention with the bigger gear, the swing of the sail is very unsettling 50cm off the water.

Cyber, it's not so much hard for an experienced windsurfer as different. For example, if you are step jiber, you have to relearn where to step. You may need to adjust how and when to open the sail and how much foot pressure it takes to carve the board. Plus, all this takes place 50cm off the water so you have to pay attention to your height as well. Some people pick it up quickly but I've got friends who are solid regular jibers who are struggling a bit with it. It may be that I live in a low wind area so we are all trying to learn with bigger sails.

Once you've adapted, though, I would agree with seanhogan that it's easier to do consistently and to exit with speed.


Thx Paducah,
yes the smallest but most used windsurfing boards I have in my collection are in the 72-80 liter size, home custom built sinkers. All jibes I typically do on them, I stay put in my footstraps until having flipped the sail and on new course in opposite direction. I understand from some testimonies here, that not moving around too much with your feet on the windfoil is making the jibe easier, so expect to try and do the same when getting on it.
Actually what I probably will find most difficult is the patience required, to carve around in a much larger radius and then also the handling of the bigger heavier board and flipping the bigger sail size, which in low wind is not a sure thing...
Going straight downwind which is part of the power jibe is never a steady position to be in for too long a time, so challenge will be to find a moderate radius to use when on the foil. As here we do not have the board and the rail of it to carve into the water when jibing around...

What radius in meters would you consider a medium aggressive jibe is like on the windfoil? 15-20 meters or how big? I am myself to start out with the Infinity 84cm foil, so speed is not the essence. So expect its more about keeping it flying steadily and then take the time to jibe it slowly around while keeping the sail lightly powered up along the journey going round.

Paducah
903 posts
Friday , 22 May 2020 1:06PM
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Cyber said..

Paducah said..


Subsonic said..

I've seen well experienced windsurfers get their foil gybes going on free ride gear quite rapidly whilst learning.
For me being a slow learner on race foils, i'm finding its like learning to do planing gybes all over again. Lots of failing, but I'm slowly getting closer to making it through (No i've not made one yet).




The swing weight issue with bigger sails is real. I can jibe all day with smaller stuff and the sail somehow makes it around. If I get lazy or don't pay attention with the bigger gear, the swing of the sail is very unsettling 50cm off the water.

Cyber, it's not so much hard for an experienced windsurfer as different. For example, if you are step jiber, you have to relearn where to step. You may need to adjust how and when to open the sail and how much foot pressure it takes to carve the board. Plus, all this takes place 50cm off the water so you have to pay attention to your height as well. Some people pick it up quickly but I've got friends who are solid regular jibers who are struggling a bit with it. It may be that I live in a low wind area so we are all trying to learn with bigger sails.

Once you've adapted, though, I would agree with seanhogan that it's easier to do consistently and to exit with speed.



Thx Paducah,
yes the smallest but most used windsurfing boards I have in my collection are in the 72-80 liter size, home custom built sinkers. All jibes I typically do on them, I stay put in my footstraps until having flipped the sail and on new course in opposite direction. I understand from some testimonies here, that not moving around too much with your feet on the windfoil is making the jibe easier, so expect to try and do the same when getting on it.
Actually what I probably will find most difficult is the patience required, to carve around in a much larger radius and then also the handling of the bigger heavier board and flipping the bigger sail size, which in low wind is not a sure thing...
Going straight downwind which is part of the power jibe is never a steady position to be in for too long a time, so challenge will be to find a moderate radius to use when on the foil. As here we do not have the board and the rail of it to carve into the water when jibing around...

What radius in meters would you consider a medium aggressive jibe is like on the windfoil? 15-20 meters or how big? I am myself to start out with the Infinity 84cm foil, so speed is not the essence. So expect its more about keeping it flying steadily and then take the time to jibe it slowly around while keeping the sail lightly powered up along the journey going round.


My only experience on an i84 was in light wind so I can't really comment on how it jibes. I will say that foils in general turn very well. It would be a mistake to judge how they turn based on the width of the board above. I regularly sail an 1100 cm2 freeride wing with 5.4 and down. It feels like a 95 l board in 12-18 (with 5.4) and could probably turn much sharper. Paradoxically, we tend to turn sharper when under powered to minimize time in the turn to maintain flight. It's totally unlike what a big, wide finned board would do in the same conditions. My overpowered jibes tend to be wider to bleed off speed downwind. Even my longer fuselage freerace foil turns very nicely like a slalom board in 10 kt winds.

There's no need to turn tightly from the beginning - you may find it more useful to master it with a slower turn. But, as you gain time on the foil, I think you'll be both surprised and pleased how much fun it is to jibe a foil.




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"Great Jibe Tutorial" started by Paducah