Forums > Windsurfing General

Buying a used Windsurf rig off Craigslist for cheap---good for learning technique?

Reply
Created by emg1776 3 months ago, 4 Apr 2020
emg1776
18 posts
4 Apr 2020 9:44PM
Thumbs Up

I am on a budget of $150 to $200. I intend to use this rig to learn technique, to see what I like before I really get into the sport. I have sailed dinghies for 20 of my 28 years on this earth and would like to get into windsurfing. I know the basics, just need something really cheap to get started.

I see several ancient windsurfing rigs on craigslist near me. I have emailed the sellers and arranged times to meet them.
1.) $75 Unknown board, unknown sail, unknown gear with a misspelled ad. redding.craigslist.org/bik/d/redding-come-get-it/7083475634.html The board looks like it might be 20 to 40 years old. How bad do you think this is gonna be?

2.) $50 O'Brien elite wind sail board (just the board) redding.craigslist.org/spo/d/redding-wind-sail-board/7094595455.html Looks to be in nice shape. Would you jump on this and find a sail and mast later, or is this worthless?

3.) $180 For a 1991 O'Brian Pro-am SL board; comes w/mast, boom, 3 different sizes of sails that have been stored for 30 years in ski bags. chico.craigslist.org/spo/d/chico-sailboard-wind-surfer/7076660271.html Am I gonna need new sails if I buy this? Seems pricey compared to the other stuff out there.

Manuel7
393 posts
4 Apr 2020 10:56PM
Thumbs Up

What's your weight? Bic techno 145 is a great learner board. Can use 5.0 to 9.0 on it!

WillyWind
47 posts
4 Apr 2020 11:42PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
emg1776 said..
I am on a budget of $150 to $200. I intend to use this rig to learn technique, to see what I like before I really get into the sport. I have sailed dinghies for 20 of my 28 years on this earth and would like to get into windsurfing. I know the basics, just need something really cheap to get started.

I see several ancient windsurfing rigs on craigslist near me. I have emailed the sellers and arranged times to meet them.
1.) $75 Unknown board, unknown sail, unknown gear with a misspelled ad. redding.craigslist.org/bik/d/redding-come-get-it/7083475634.html The board looks like it might be 20 to 40 years old. How bad do you think this is gonna be?

2.) $50 O'Brien elite wind sail board (just the board) redding.craigslist.org/spo/d/redding-wind-sail-board/7094595455.html Looks to be in nice shape. Would you jump on this and find a sail and mast later, or is this worthless?

3.) $180 For a 1991 O'Brian Pro-am SL board; comes w/mast, boom, 3 different sizes of sails that have been stored for 30 years in ski bags. chico.craigslist.org/spo/d/chico-sailboard-wind-surfer/7076660271.html Am I gonna need new sails if I buy this? Seems pricey compared to the other stuff out there.


the links are not working for me. You can learn on pretty much anything, especially if you have sailing background, but a beginner friendly gear will make the learning experience must faster and fun.
The general advice is not to get O'Brien boards. At least most of the ones popping up for sale are going to be extremely heavy and not that great. I would also steer away from the Pro-am SL board (I am assuming it is a slalom board).
It seems you are close to San Francisco so maybe you can check CL from there and also see if they have a local forum (I think they have a facebook group). I am pretty sure if you get in contact with windsurfers from SF you will find everything you need for a really good price (yes, even for 200 total for a board, mast, boom, and a couple of sails to start).
I know that you might want to start right now and maybe traveling to SF is not an option for you. Keep searching and good luck!

MagicRide
496 posts
5 Apr 2020 2:41AM
Thumbs Up

A shop is going to charge you way over your limit for a complete kit. I would find a populated windsurfing location, talk to the sailors about gear. They may have some gear for you they want to unload for a killer price, perhaps in your price range. That's your best bet. But, how many areas are closed with the COVID problem? A lot! Craigslist has mostly old, warn out stuff that is ready to snap n break the minute you get a good wind. Once in a while you can get lucky. If you live in a populated windsurfing town, you may have more gear selection on Craigslist. Go with your gut, if it looks old and ready to fall apart, it most likely will when you own it and you're out on the water stranded when it breaks. Look for a wide, floaty board that doesn't have much give on the deck and bottom side of board when you push your hand into it. Good luck!

forceten
1163 posts
5 Apr 2020 6:58AM
Thumbs Up

Be well advised to take a lesson to see if you like it, instead of $xx on unsuitable stuff

emg1776
18 posts
5 Apr 2020 9:15AM
Thumbs Up

@Force Ten: I know I will LOVE windsurfing, as I love sailing my dinghy on the mountain lakes near me. I like planing across the water under a Bermuda rig, leaning out of the boat.

@Magic Ride: I am currently unable to go to the "popular windsurfing spots" to talk to other sailors about gear due to CoVid restrictions. You are definitely right about not going to shops, they will be way out of my price range. THANK YOU for this piece of advice: "Look for a wide, floaty board that doesn't have much give on the deck and bottom side of board when you push your hand into it. " How much is too much "give"? like should it feel like a regular fiberglass surfboard? Harder? Softer?

@ Willy Wind, thank you for the advice about the SF Windsurfing group on Facebook. Regarding beginner rigs, I have not seen any on craigslist near me, haven't seen anything with a centerboard. I think that with my sailing background, I can probably begin learning with a non-centerboard rig.......I hope.

Why is the general advice not to get O'Brien boards? Why is the general advice not to get slalom boards? I am going to see this seller tomorrow and I fully expect his gear to be junk, but I would like to know WHY it is junk, and not just "my feeling as a sailor that it is junk".

How heavy is "too heavy" for a 9.5ft/114in/2.8meter long, 1.9ft/23in/0.58meter wide board?

I can (and will) bring a scale with me so I have a good reading on what old junk weighs for the next time I look at something.

sboardcrazy
NSW, 7031 posts
5 Apr 2020 11:23AM
Thumbs Up

Slalom boards are not beginner friendly. They are go fast gear for more experienced sailors. You don't want too much speed when you're learning ,the outboard footstraps are much harder to get into and they are generally designed to be sailed really powered up.

emg1776
18 posts
5 Apr 2020 9:25AM
Thumbs Up

Why is the general advice not to get O'Brien boards?

How heavy is "too heavy" for a 114in long, 23in wide board?

Aside from looking for obvious cracks and damage, how else to check if something is too old or worn?

Is faded, dry plastic a good indicator of "too old and worn and likely to snap in wind"?

How should a sail feel if it is still usable?

Should a good sail be: 1.) completely rigid like a sheet of thick plastic when laid out? or 2.) Flexible like the Dacron of a hang glider wing?

MagicRide
496 posts
5 Apr 2020 9:42AM
Thumbs Up

Since you've sailed dingies, this may help. For example, a Laser deck would be a similar comparison. But a Laser deck may have more glass covering the deck than a sailboard. But when I purchased Lasers, I'd push down on the deck to see how solid the boat is. That similar idea you'd want to use when looking to buy a board. Look for a 2013 or newer, about 20-25ish pounds for a floaty wide board 150-180L, 7-8.5 feet long about, shorter the better. That's what I'd look for.

decrepit
WA, 10023 posts
5 Apr 2020 9:55AM
Thumbs Up

we were talking about beginner sails yesterday, definitely go with ones that have at least 4 battens, but no camber inducers.

There's two ways of shaping sails, seam and luff curve. So a fully luff curve shaped sail will sit very flat until a mast is inserted, a seam shaped sail will have excess cloth around the lower area, then there's a combo of both. My opinion is the combo is probably a better learning sail.
A fully luff curve shaped sail will typically have the battens pocking in front of the mast, and have no draft, when statically rigged, it takes wind pressure to "rotate" the sail. This means there is a wind range where the sail is unstable, between no and full draft. A well designed combo can have draft to start with, and won't need as much wind to "turn on".

A fully seam shaped sail will need very little wind to fully power up, but can lack adjustment for different wind strengths.
This is extremely hard to tell unrigged. There's also the problem of different sails needing different bend curves to set properly.

Pre mid to late 90s sails didn't have loose leaches and require much downhaul, this gave them a fairly narrow range. More modern sails require much more downhaul and have loose leaches, this gives them a greater range and more top end speed.

So it would be easy to buy old gear that is practically worthless.

Around here, guys have found half reasonable gear at the local tip.

Unless you are going to sail in off shore conditions you don't need a centre board. But a centre board will help if you can only find narrow boards, it adds to stability and makes going up wind easy.

boards should be similar hardness to surfboards, the obvious places to check are around the feet area on the deck and between tail and mast track on the bottom.

emg1776
18 posts
5 Apr 2020 10:25AM
Thumbs Up

Thank You Decrepit! I am probably going to have to use gear from the mid-90s and before at the price range I am looking at. but that is fine. The fiberglass-over-plywood dinghy I was given many years ago has a 100% cotton bermuda-rig sail that was made in 1962. The battens in my dinghy's sail are solid wood stringers.

Old gear just needs to work as well as it did when it was made, and it will be fine.

I really appreciate the info about the luff and the camber of windsurf sails, and how that affects power and handling.

I really appreciate that you told me that "windsurf boards should be similar hardness to surfboards", and I understand why the feet area would get "squishy" but, I don't know why the area between the tail and mast track on the bottom would be an issue?

decrepit
WA, 10023 posts
5 Apr 2020 10:48AM
Thumbs Up

Depends how the board has been used/abused. Doing 50 to 60mph (modern slalom boards will do over 70mph but I doubt what you'll be looking at wont), over choppy water can put high loads on the bottom. Same as wave boards landing a big jump flat.
If the bottom sandwich isn't stiff enough this will fatigue the core foam, bad enough in some cases for the whole back area to delaminate. This is more likely if the bung has been left done up in hot or low pressure conditions.

The other thing with modern mylar sails is UV radiation, they'll only take so much then they fall apart, and it's hard to tell how close they are to that point.

emg1776
18 posts
5 Apr 2020 11:04AM
Thumbs Up

Thank you for the EXCELLENT reply, I can use this, and I hope that others who look up "how to buy windsurf board on craigslist" also see these forum posts and gain info from them. I think I now understand how the delamination would happen on the stern section of the board. Can I also check for these issues by trying to bend the board over my knee and if the rear area bends slightly more than the front area, then there might be inside damage that makes it weaker?

MagicRide
496 posts
5 Apr 2020 11:19AM
Thumbs Up

I remember when I was learning, I hung around some spots where I met some knowlegable windsurfers and learned a great deal from them. That being said, I'd go back and see them again, talk to them some more. They got to know me a little, I got to know them a little. Then they started setting me up with gear they haven't used in a while, gear they taught their wife and teenage kids on for next to nothing. I got a lot of free gear thrown in too. They saw the passion I had for learning the sport, and in return, I received some nice gear. One of the guys was sponcered and received new gear all the time. One of those sails I got was brand new, and I paid 80 percent less than it was selling for at retail. You will find gear at an affordable price that fits your budget. Just be patient. You may have better luck, once this COVID 19 virus is over. We're hoping by the beginning of summer, this virus strain will be over with, at least in the USA for that timeframe.

emg1776
18 posts
5 Apr 2020 11:38AM
Thumbs Up

I think Australia has a much better chance of containment and eradication of the virus through non-vaccine methods than we do here. Once that happens, you will have a much easier time going to the beach down there!! There is no windsurf scene near me, only dinghy and small-ish boat lake sailing. That's how I got my free dinghy! The same method you describe, talking with people and letting it be known that I want to sail.

WillyWind
47 posts
5 Apr 2020 11:39AM
Thumbs Up

Hey emg,

I was able to open the ads. the first board is a Hifly 330fx. I have the same board. 330 cm long and 160/190l (you will need to do a little bit of research on the dimensions).
This is a "plastic" board; either polyethylene or ABS or something like that. that means that instead of a fiberglass shell (or carbon, kevlar, wood, etc) it has plastic. The good thing about that construction is that it is pretty tough; it does not crack as easily as fiberglass. the downside is that it is heavy. My board weighs 37 pounds with no fin or daggerboard. I checked my board for "strength" and man, I pressed with both thumbs in many places and the thing did not gave in at all! look at the board as if you were looking at a piece of lumber for straightness. you don't want to see depressions or bumps. If you see some, press there hard. don't forget you are talking about a very old and cheap board so do not expect everything to be perfect.
check that the daggerboard moves freely (it should be a little bit stiff but not too much...)

The mast track on that board can use modern bases so that is a plus as well

if you weight less than 200 pounds you should do fine with that board. Of course, a newer board much wider would be easier but that is not the case now.

The good thing about having a board with a daggerboard when you are learning is that you will have much more success going back to where you started and you will be able to go upwind pretty well

sboardcrazy is correct re: slalom boards

O'brien was also a plastic board and I think they were made on the west coast (maybe Washington state?). the second board does not have a daggerboard. I would not buy it because you will spend a lot of time and probably money getting the right one.

Let me know if you have any more questions and good luck!

Mr Milk
NSW, 2041 posts
5 Apr 2020 2:03PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
decrepit said..
Depends how the board has been used/abused. Doing 50 to 60mph (modern slalom boards will do over 70mph but I doubt what you'll be looking at wont), over choppy water can put high loads on the bottom. Same as wave boards landing a big jump flat.
If the bottom sandwich isn't stiff enough this will fatigue the core foam, bad enough in some cases for the whole back area to delaminate. This is more likely if the bung has been left done up in hot or low pressure conditions.

The other thing with modern mylar sails is UV radiation, they'll only take so much then they fall apart, and it's hard to tell how close they are to that point.



I know slalom sailors are fast, but 70mph? Isn't the world record a little over 50 knots? And not done on a normal 58-66 cm wide board

emg1776
18 posts
5 Apr 2020 12:08PM
Thumbs Up

Thank you! I take it that you like the Hifly 330fx. I keep trying to contact that seller with no response. I hope he still has it. Now that someone on here has seen the board, and doesn't say that it is terrible, I will put a lot of energy into go to see that one.

I am still planning to meet with the seller of the O'Brien Slalom Board tomorrow to see his board, harness, three sails, and accessory gear. Very good to know that it is plastic. Thank you.

WillyWind
47 posts
5 Apr 2020 1:13PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
emg1776 said..
Thank you! I take it that you like the Hifly 330fx. I keep trying to contact that seller with no response. I hope he still has it. Now that someone on here has seen the board, and doesn't say that it is terrible, I will put a lot of energy into go to see that one.

I am still planning to meet with the seller of the O'Brien Slalom Board tomorrow to see his board, harness, three sails, and accessory gear. Very good to know that it is plastic. Thank you.


I did some research and if that slalom board is 9'4" then it is 134 l. that is too small for a first board unless you weigh under 100 lbs... that board is an old school slalom board so it is pretty narrow. I know that you are pretty excited and you want to get something ASAP to get on the water but if I were you I would not buy that slalom board. Whatever you do, keep us posted!

decrepit
WA, 10023 posts
5 Apr 2020 4:41PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Mr Milk said..
I know slalom sailors are fast, but 70mph? Isn't the world record a little over 50 knots? And not done on a normal 58-66 cm wide board


Silly old fart time, I'm thinking 70km/hr, but because I'm talking to an American wanted to use mph, but forgot to convert it!!!!!
So yes more like 35mph for a slalom board

decrepit
WA, 10023 posts
5 Apr 2020 5:01PM
Thumbs Up

I'll just mention this in case it applies, but somehow I don't think so.

The young, keen, fit wave sailors here, sometimes will learn on small boards. They bypass the uphaul stage and start by learning to water start. For this you need fairly consistent and steady moderate wind. So somewhere in the region of 15kts to 20kts. Using that method you could get away with a board 10% to 20% more volume than you weigh. Whereas for learning the uphaul method you need a board that easily floats you probably 50% to 100% more than your weight.
The uphaul method is easier, in good steady light wind conditions you can be sailing almost straight away.
But the water start method is faster to get you planning, but a lot more hard work and frustration getting there.

Not many people teach this method, and it's hard to learn without an instructor watching what you are doing wrong. There's a lot of stuff going on that's counter intuitive, but as a sailor, you have a chance of understanding that.

However if you are mainly doing light wind stuff you'll need to learn to uphaul on bigger boards anyway, so probably the easiest way to go.

As to bending a board across your knee, if you can do that, the board is useless. If it's delaminated, that should be obvious, the sandwich will normally just "bubble" up. I haven't seen it happen to a plastic board though. as said they are normally very tough. Not a bad way to go for learning on as they will withstand the crashes better.

sboardcrazy
NSW, 7031 posts
6 Apr 2020 2:59PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
decrepit said..
I'll just mention this in case it applies, but somehow I don't think so.

The young, keen, fit wave sailors here, sometimes will learn on small boards. They bypass the uphaul stage and start by learning to water start. For this you need fairly consistent and steady moderate wind. So somewhere in the region of 15kts to 20kts. Using that method you could get away with a board 10% to 20% more volume than you weigh. Whereas for learning the uphaul method you need a board that easily floats you probably 50% to 100% more than your weight.
The uphaul method is easier, in good steady light wind conditions you can be sailing almost straight away.
But the water start method is faster to get you planning, but a lot more hard work and frustration getting there.

Not many people teach this method, and it's hard to learn without an instructor watching what you are doing wrong. There's a lot of stuff going on that's counter intuitive, but as a sailor, you have a chance of understanding that.

However if you are mainly doing light wind stuff you'll need to learn to uphaul on bigger boards anyway, so probably the easiest way to go.

As to bending a board across your knee, if you can do that, the board is useless. If it's delaminated, that should be obvious, the sandwich will normally just "bubble" up. I haven't seen it happen to a plastic board though. as said they are normally very tough. Not a bad way to go for learning on as they will withstand the crashes better.


I think he's going to sail mountain lakes? If so he will probably have gusty maybe light winds so a bigger board will help.

WillyWind
47 posts
7 Apr 2020 2:22AM
Thumbs Up

m.facebook.com/groups/CrissySwap/

emg1776
18 posts
7 Apr 2020 7:36PM
Thumbs Up

Ok, I have quite the story for you guys!!! I went to look at the 1991 O'Brian Pro-am SL board for $180. He directly told me that he hasn't had much interest in it, and I believe him. The price is too high. He is about the same height and build as I am, and he told me that he "took one lesson from some guy who put him on a very big and slow board and then immediately after that lesson, bought this one back in 1991." He told me that he had a lot of trouble at first, learning by reading books, but "got the hang of it eventually." He weighs about the same as me, and he told me that he only ever uphauled the board. (I was surprised because I weigh 165lbs or 75kg and assumed that I would have trouble uphauling a 145L board). Seller did not understand what a "Water Start" is when I asked him about doing one. He told me that to turn and/or tack: "You get off the board, drop the sail into the water, and swim around the board to uphaul the sail on the other side and then go back across the lake."
THE BOARD:
1.) It is a plastic board and it weighs a lot more than my old fiberglass surfboard. Unfortunately, I forgot to bring my bathroom scale, so I couldn't get an exact weight, but I estimate it is around 35 to 45lbs. NEGATIVE
2.) Board is 112" long by a 23" beam by 5" Max thick. Polyethylene Plastic not Fiberglass. Seller claims that it is a 145 Liter board. NEGATIVE
3.) One small damage hole in the rear fill-plug, no other damage. Tip and tail are in good shape. No delamination. POSTITIVE
4.) Universal Joint is in good shape. POSITIVE
5.) Main fin is in good shape. Extra fins, one is in good shape, one is cracked. POSITIVE
7.) Footholds will need new fabric sewn in, but are useable. NEGATIVE
6.) Overall condition: very good for age and use. However, it is an advanced Slalom Board. Seller seemed to have trouble handling the board back in the '90s with only one lesson and no prior sailing experience. NEGATIVE
.
MAST AND GEAR:
1.) Mast is in good shape and all joints fit snugly. 196" long. POSITIVE
2.) Boom is in decent shape, except for odd wobbliness at the slip-joint between the mast and the boom, but this could be normal or just how I rigged it. NEGATIVE
3.) Harness: in good shape, except for one very faded buckle that will have to be re-sewn. Harness attachment points are ok. POSITIVE
.
THREE SAILS:
1.) Largest sail is the only sail he ever used and it looks very old and faded from a lot of sun exposure, and may be delaiminating. NEGATIVE
2.) Second sail is not bad, he said he rarely used it, it looks to have been stored clean and dry. POSITIVE
3.) Smallest Sail he said he never used, and it looks it. Looks almost new, even though it is from 1991. POSITIVE

My questions are:
If I could get this for something resembling a reasonable price:
1.) Can I use the board with the smaller sails?
2.) Seller claimed that with the big sail he could uphaul it and use it in conditions only between 10 to 15kt winds. Does this sound accurate?
3.) If the smaller sails demand more wind, will I be able to learn on such a board (145L, 40lbs) in greater than 15kt winds?
.
I estimate this board to have an actual value of around $50 American dollars. He wants $180....

decrepit
WA, 10023 posts
7 Apr 2020 9:40PM
Thumbs Up

If you can get it for
$50. probably worth it. Do the sails have sizes written on them? If you are going to learn uphauling first, (and that's probably a good idea). I think it'd easier to start with a small sail in light winds. It doesn't take you long to get moving that way, not very fast, but you are sailing. The draw back is learning bad habits. The idea is to let the sail do the work, if there's little sail pressure, it's easier to overpower the sail and do the work yourself. Once in strong wind, you then have to unlearn your bad habits.

No need to fall off and swim around the board. Once you can uphaul it's not that hard to steer the board by leaning the rig in the opposite direction you want to go, takes a little bit of extra balance to walk around the board.

If the board is 145l you have enough extra buoyancy, but you have to add board and rig to your weight to find just how much, so another 20kg for board and possibly 15kg for rig that's about 110kg leaving 30kg buoyancy. Certainly not excessive, and it's a board you shouldn't grow out of quickly

I think the volume would be close, I make that 58cm by 2,8m aprox, But that's a tad narrow for easy uphauling, nit ideal for learning, but possible.
My biggest board is 2.5cm x 65cm, It's 110l and I can uphaul it but I'm only 65kg. My next smaller board is 2.45m x 53cm and around 90l. That is much harder to uphaul but possible in flat water if I persist.
Saying that, I've seen good sailors, uphaul small waveboards with water up to their knees, no rope, just grabbing the mast. So anything is possible if you are good enough.

We need to know sail sizes, before any estimate of wind range can be made. He is no guide, if he was jump off turning, he didn't progress very far.

I would think you'll have lots of trouble getting planning in 10kts on that board. My min planning wind strength on my 65cm wide board with a 6.6 m2 sail and a smaller fin, I could go to almost 30kts, but I've never tried it, at that wind strength it's much more comfortable (and lots faster) on a 43cm 70l board. My sailsizes are modern cambered sailes. On older non cambered wave type sails they'd be much smaller about 4.0 m>2 for the smallest one, and I've never owned a big enough wave sail to plane in 13kts.

So yes +s and -s you may not grow out of it very quick, but it won't be that easy to learn on.

What's your water state like? the smoother it is the easier it is to uphaul, chop or swell will make it much harder to balance. The crucial time is the transition from pulling the sail up by the rope, to grabbing the boom and pulling power on, this is when most people fall off.

MagicRide
496 posts
7 Apr 2020 11:32PM
Thumbs Up

If it were me, I'd wait for a newer generation kit to come around. That being said, you will most likely be spending more than you anticipated in your budget. At least you will have gear that works well, find parts for, and will be lighter weight than the old stuff. Put some money away towards this gear. I believe you will be happier in the long run. Some people here recommend a lesson or two. I would highly recommend that too. You will have so much more insight on the sport, as well as some hands on experience to guide you forward on a purchase. And who knows, perhaps the person giving you a lesson just may have a kit for you that is in your budget. Keep plugging away!

emg1776
18 posts
8 Apr 2020 8:14AM
Thumbs Up

@MagicRide, I am doing that, but saving up the money for a "nice" rig will take 3 to 5 years under the current budget I have made. That is why I am specifically looking at something between $100 and $150. It will get me up and on the water now, rather than 3 years from now. I agree with the idea of getting a lesson, but that is something I would have to pay for, and is therefore not in the budget (for now).

My plan is to self-learn 1.) the basics of technique. 2.) sport-specific terms (like "uphaul" or "liters" in board measurment) and 3.) understand some things about windsurfing that an instructor would have to spend time teaching a rank beginner. Then, when I take a lesson, the instructor can focus his limited, expensive, time on teaching me how to correct the things that I am not doing correctly.

emg1776
18 posts
8 Apr 2020 8:57AM
Thumbs Up

@Decrepit I hope I can get him to come down to a reasonable price. If he comes down to $50, I will get it, in order to learn.
.
With the damaged "large size" sail (which he said was the only one he ever used), the damaged plug on the board, and the damaged foot-holds, he may be willing to come down a bit. These damaged items are a "real reason" to reduce the price.
.
Then there are my personal reasons that this particular board is less valuable to me as a beginner: 1.) It's a slalom board (not really a beginner model) 2.) It's plastic, not fiberglass. 3.) It's heavy (much heavier than my fiberglass surfboard). 4.) It's narrow, therefore difficult to uphaul. (Though obviously not impossible if he was doing it.) 5.) The sails are a very old design (nevermind the damaged one!) and do not provide a good range of wind speeds that the board can be used in.
.
I will try to ask him what the sail sizes are. I will also try to find out what kind of water conditions (flat, chop, etc) he used it in.
He told me that he exclusively sailed on Thermilito Afterbay which is a pretty small body of water, only about 50ft deep and less than a mile across, that lies above a very flat valley where high winds can develop and blow across the lake without disturbing the water surface too much. Here are some links with pictures that show how flat the surface of Thermilito Afterbay is. It's like glass. Even in high wind. www.forebayaquaticcenter.com/ I realize that he may have been sailing in VERY special conditions to be able to use this board with so little experience.

By contrast here is a link, with pictures on a public Facebook page, of the windy, choppy mountain lake that I will be sailing on. www.facebook.com/Whiskeytown-Sailing-Club-245522131111/

The wind on Whiskeytown Lake where I sail can get as high as 60knots (this is in the area where the hot, dry, high winds can blow down power lines and start massive fires). I have sailed a Sunfish when such conditions started to develop and by the time it got to 20knots, I was booking it back to the dock as fast as possible. Have been out there in a larger boat at 35kt, and the chop and waves are intense.

emg1776
18 posts
8 Apr 2020 8:58AM
Thumbs Up

Where I will sail on Whiskeytown Lake, the choppiness directly correlates with wind speed:

For every 10knots more, add 10cm more to the wave height. Do you think that I will be able to uphaul and sail on that kind of chop, with the amount of wind required to get it on plane?

decrepit
WA, 10023 posts
8 Apr 2020 11:20AM
Thumbs Up

Once you have enough wind to plane, you also have enough wind to waterstart. And if you have enough sail control to be able to plane, you should also have enough skill to waterstart.
But yes uphauling in chop is harder, and will make learning more difficult for you. Perhaps you could use both methods. uphaul when the wind's light, and have a go at water/beach starts when it's too strong.

The other thing about the sails, if they are also slalom sails to match the board, that will make it even harder to learn. They will have camber inducers where the battens meet the mast to keep max draft at all times. This means the sails never go flat when fully sheeted out, making it harder to uphaul and water start.

A lot depends on the chop, some places the chop is nicely organised with long straight lines, other places it's disorganised with lumps going in all directions. this makes it much more difficult. I think it depends on the shore line and how the chop gets reflected back from it. Also big power boats can add all sorts of interesting waves.

I wouldn't worry too much about chop, you should be able to plane OK in 20cm/30cm chop.

The thing with that board, it's more suited to water/beach starting than uphauling, depending on those sails it should be possible to learn that way, in a steady 15kts. You can start the basics in 10kts, learn to body drag, keeping the board across the wind, without trying to get up. this will help you learn, both sail and board control. The most counter intuitive thing about water starting happens when you first try to get up. Instinctively you want to pull on the boom and push on the board. This is the exact opposite of what is needed. You have to pull on the board to get it underneath you, and push on the boom to get the sail up to get wind pressure. When you get a board, and if yopu want to explore this method I can go into more detail. But at some stage learning it makes windsurfing a lot easier. the sail is pulling you onto the board rather than vice versa

MagicRide
496 posts
8 Apr 2020 11:48AM
Thumbs Up

I follow you. In the beginning, there was nobody in my area to watch, so I self taught myself. It took a while, but I had a blast figuring it all out. I purchased a used bic rock board, which came with 2 sails, one mast, a boom and 2 fins at a surf shop for $250. Now this was almost 20 years ago. So I gave it a try and after 4 attempts, I gave up, put it in the garage for 3 years. After that, I thought I'd try it a few more times before I ended up selling it for good. Well, I ended up catching on after 4 more sessions later. I realised 3 years ago after trying it again I didn't have enough wind to learn. This time was windier. Glad I stuck with it the second time, because I've been addicted to this ever since. I can't tell you how much fun I had with that bic. Had it for about 8 years. Then when I started improving, I got my first used short board. It wasn't until 4 years ago, I bought my first new board, and a new foil board last year. Windsurfing is a pretty cool life and takes all the stress of daily life away when your on the water.



Subscribe
Reply

Forums > Windsurfing General


"Buying a used Windsurf rig off Craigslist for cheap---good for learning technique?" started by emg1776