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Carve gybe - Please explain

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Created by Stuthepirate > 9 months ago, 23 Sep 2015
Stuthepirate
SA, 3434 posts
23 Sep 2015 10:08PM
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So it's been brought up in a number of topics.
The learning barrier of a Carve Gybe.
I just want a definition between:
1. A carve gybe
2. A planing gybe
3. A laydown gybe
Is there a difference or just a perception?

Mark _australia
WA, 18959 posts
23 Sep 2015 8:50PM
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All the same but in #3 you lay the rig down to the extreme


decrepit
WA, 9029 posts
23 Sep 2015 8:53PM
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My understanding is 1. a carve gybe is done with the feet and board, so the board is carving a turning track through the water. Unlike a flair gybe where the sail is doing the work. So a carve gybe isn't necessarily a fully planing gybe
2. A planing gybe is where the board doesn't fall of the plane min speed not below about 10knots.
I guess if you're good enough on a big board you can do a fully planing flair gybe, where the board goes round very flat. So a planing gybe isn't necessarily a carve gybe
3. A laydown, is where the sail is totally de-powered at the downwind point by "laying it down" close to the water. This needs a lot of "Gs" to be developed when laying it down, so it can only be successfully done at speed, try this too slow and you won't be able to lift the sail up again.

And I guess the difference in understanding between Mark and me is whether a "planing gybe" means a gybe entered on the plane, or coming out of it on the plane?

PKenny
SA, 199 posts
23 Sep 2015 10:26PM
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Any gybe you come out of dry is a good gybe

decrepit
WA, 9029 posts
23 Sep 2015 8:58PM
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Select to expand quote
PKenny said..
Any gybe you come out of dry is a good gybe


Any gybe where you saturate the bystanders with your rooster tail is even better!!!

Subsonic
WA, 1553 posts
23 Sep 2015 10:06PM
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I think decrepit nailed it.

carve gybe: you plane in, allowing you to use the rail to swing into the gybe, but don't necessarily manage to plane out.

Planing gybe: you plane in, you plane out.

Lay down: you carve in and lay the sail close to the water to dump power. Not necessarily managing to plane out.

That's my take on it

TRIMMER
QLD, 151 posts
24 Sep 2015 6:46AM
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A non planing carve jibe i would call a slam jibe.
All three jibes could be the same jibe if planing.
Low speed planing jibe( planeing)
Med speed planing (carve and planeing)
High speed planing ( carve planing laydown)
Generally

Mark _australia
WA, 18959 posts
24 Sep 2015 10:20AM
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Subsonic said..
I think decrepit nailed it.

carve gybe: you plane in, allowing you to use the rail to swing into the gybe, but don't necessarily manage to plane out.

Planing gybe: you plane in, you plane out.

Lay down: you carve in and lay the sail close to the water to dump power. Not necessarily managing to plane out.

That's my take on it


I alwasy thought 1 and 2 to be the same.

Now I agree here ^^^^ I guess carve gybe does not imply you planed out of it.

evlPanda
NSW, 8663 posts
24 Sep 2015 3:43PM
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A planing gybe when executed properly, and perhaps more so on flat water, is one of the most satisfying things I've ever done.
When everything goes right it's just magic. I've had tubes at pipe that weren't half as satisfying.

Like this.



(how much better is it without music that you can hear the wind?)

Knucklehead
NSW, 11 posts
24 Sep 2015 4:15PM
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That ^^^ is just magic. I would love to gybe like that - Even just once.

John340
QLD, 1919 posts
24 Sep 2015 4:49PM
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^^^ I agree a full planning gybe feels fantastic.

The tack and laydown 360 is amazing. How does he do that?

Macroscien
QLD, 4619 posts
24 Sep 2015 7:46PM
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John340 said..
^^^ I agree a full planning gybe feels fantastic.

The tack and laydown 360 is amazing. How does he do that?


Can 360 be ever fully planing ? That will be super interesting to see ..

Cluffy
NSW, 344 posts
24 Sep 2015 8:40PM
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This is about how I do it although I regard this as more of a power gybe than a full blast laydown. Things to note about this vid are the big sheet on of the sail as I throw it into the turn, and I mean throw it, I try to get from sailing to gybing as quickly and with as little hesitation as possible. The other thing to note is how I sheet the sail out gradually as I bring it up. This enables me to gently shift my weight forward slightly to be in a more stable position for the transition. sometimes I go feet then sail, sometimes sail then feet and when I get it perfectly right both at the same time. Usually it's feet just before sail but it all depends on how it feels at the time. There's two main reasons I like this kind of gybe, It gives great rail pressure and helps control bouncies but mainly I just like doing it.

hope this helps and any suggestions on technique improvements much appreciated.

PhilSWR
NSW, 1104 posts
24 Sep 2015 9:36PM
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Cluffy said..

any suggestions on technique improvements much appreciated.



Yeah one suggestion, show me how to gybe like that when you're up next month

Vince68
WA, 646 posts
24 Sep 2015 8:24PM
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Hey Cluffy come over to the west and show the gumpies here (mainly me) how to do that

powersloshin
NSW, 999 posts
24 Sep 2015 10:43PM
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Carve Crave ?

Windxtasy
WA, 3870 posts
24 Sep 2015 9:51PM
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Stuthepirate said..
So it's been brought up in a number of topics.
The learning barrier of a Carve Gybe.
I just want a definition between:
1. A carve gybe
2. A planing gybe
3. A laydown gybe
Is there a difference or just a perception?


the difference is
1. A carve gybe - I can do this one 99% of the time
2. A planing gybe - I can do this one sometimes if there is juuust the right amount of wind.
3. A laydown gybe - not even in my wildest dreams



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