Forums > Windsurfing General

New board: volume recommendations

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Created by bkellis1 2 months ago, 15 Jun 2018
bkellis1
9 posts
15 Jun 2018 4:01AM
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I'm new to windsurfing (beginner) and interested in buying my first board. I live in an area that does not have any shops that sell equipment and no real windsurfing community to get advice from so I will also be teaching myself without the benefit of classes. My question is what volume of board should I be looking for? I'm a pretty small guy and my current weight is 60 kg (132 lbs). I think I want a pretty wide board, but how floaty should it be? Is there such a thing as getting a board with too much volume? I'll mostly be on a lake with mild chop and light-moderate winds (10-20 mph). Will wind speed also affect the decision on volume of board? I'd appreciate any advice since this will likely be a one-time shot to get it right. Thanks in advance.

Imax1
VIC, 1292 posts
15 Jun 2018 8:04AM
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Big board , small sail. 150 litres , 5 m .
How much do u want to spend ?

Mark _australia
WA, 17948 posts
15 Jun 2018 6:43AM
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^^ +1

Also - wide. Don't fall for the 1980's equipment that some dodgy seller listed as 150L or 200L and they are just having a guess.....

It is perfectly fine if you don't have a lot of money, but old skinny boards are hard to learn on and might have no parts availabiity etc.

bkellis1
9 posts
15 Jun 2018 6:48AM
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Any recommendations on minimum width, and any specific brands and versions of board to consider. I haven't thought of cost yet, just trying to get a good idea of parameters to be looking for. If I found a board that had twice the volume you recommend, what are the drawbacks of going with more volume? Sorry for the newbie questions, but have to learn somehow. Thanks

forceten
343 posts
15 Jun 2018 7:27AM
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Mark _australia said..
^^ +1

Also - wide. Don't fall for the 1980's equipment that some dodgy seller listed as 150L or 200L and they are just having a guess.....

It is perfectly fine if you don't have a lot of money, but old skinny boards are hard to learn on and might have no parts availabiity etc.

Excellent advise there, take note.

Sails , while I didnt notice you asked, like said 5.0, but 5.5 tops, wouldn't go smaller than 5.0, unless restricted to.

75cm width would be ample. This sport is very personal, answers dont fit each its always YMMV

forceten
343 posts
15 Jun 2018 7:27AM
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Select to expand quote
Mark _australia said..
^^ +1

Also - wide. Don't fall for the 1980's equipment that some dodgy seller listed as 150L or 200L and they are just having a guess.....

It is perfectly fine if you don't have a lot of money, but old skinny boards are hard to learn on and might have no parts availabiity etc.

Excellent advise there, take note.

Sails , while I didnt notice you asked, like said 5.0, but 5.5 tops, wouldn't go smaller than 5.0, unless restricted to.

75cm width would be ample. This sport is very personal, answers dont fit each its always YMMV

Imax1
VIC, 1292 posts
15 Jun 2018 9:51AM
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Mabee a old Starboard Go 155 tuffskin , at this size it is 85 wide and more than enough volume , ( wide , stable ,soft on the knees , kinda fast and indestructible ) and a old full X ply wave sail. This would be a good self teaching kind of board that you will get thrills from when your ready.

cammd
QLD, 1771 posts
15 Jun 2018 10:28AM
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Sailing on a lake in light to moderate conditions, first board to learn and progress on. Look at a hybrid style with a centreboard.
Models could include Starboard Phantom 295, NP RS One, Kona, Bic Techno 293.

They are good fun in planning conditions, you can sail any angles, not just stuck to reaching and they still sail good off the plane in centreboard mode.

Way more versatile than a big freeride type board

Simon100
QLD, 461 posts
15 Jun 2018 10:37AM
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Isnt 150l absolutley massive at 60kg , thats weight plus 90L. Wouldnt weight plus 40L be fine and open up a heap more options. Dont be afraid to use a larger sail if the wind is light, you wont learn to plane if the sail is simply to small to plane. Th suitable board depends alot on your fitness and what you hope to acheive if you want to put effort in to learning go smaller, if you want to just float around 3 times a year maybe a 150l would be good

Faff
VIC, 593 posts
15 Jun 2018 11:53AM
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75 cm wide, 120L Freemove (wide and thin) in stronger construction - JP Magic Ride, Fanatic Gecko, etc.. You can keep using it as a light wind board with a big sail once you progress to smaller boards.

Paddles B'mere
QLD, 1526 posts
15 Jun 2018 11:57AM
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If you want to be sailing pretty much straight away then >145 litres and >80cm wide will be perfect for a planing type short board or a windSUP style longboard will be ok too. You will either keep this board as a light wind board in the future or you will sell it easily to another learner when you've had enough of it. Good quality, modern learning to intermediate boards are not that plentiful second hand so be prepared to pay $500 to $1000 and if you find one for less than $500 then swoop on it before someone else does. Any modern rig will do the job in the short term for learning and at your size maybe try to find a cheap 4.5m wave sail and a suitable cheap mast (probably 400) long). Enjoy

bkellis1
9 posts
15 Jun 2018 10:08AM
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Ok, thanks for all of the replies. I have some research to do on all of the recommended boards and I'm sure I will have additional questions after I compare all of these choices. Thanks for the guidance. I'll reply after I compile a list of comparisons. Thanks again!

joe windsurf
1346 posts
15 Jun 2018 1:19PM
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as a heavyweight, i am off the spectrum in terms of the average windsurfer/person
you on the other hand are off the spectrum in terms of lightweight
they just don't make boards specifically designed for us ...

often i start people much heavier than you with sails in the 5.x range
for you with 60 kilos, and a 5.x sail, you can plane in about 15-16 knots
i will be using that sail in about 25-30 knots = double
you could perhaps start with a sail in the 3.5-4.0 range (lighter and easier)

in terms of volume, the same issue applies
my weight in kilos + some buffer (30-40 liters) means i start on a 150-160 liter board
you based on this idea could start on a 100 liter board, but that does not make sense
those boards are typically wave boards
but 125 liters might do it for you !!

NOT easy - especially if there are NO references in your area

i have written about starting here:
joewindsurfer.blogspot.com/p/how-you-can-start-windsurfing.html

at that weight are you really young or REALLY lightweight ??
if you are young, you may want to think that one day you will be heavier ...
and not go too small

Paddles B'mere
QLD, 1526 posts
15 Jun 2018 4:12PM
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Most of our Sandstone crew are "big boned" except for Parso who has been learning with us over the last 12 months or so. He is your size bkellis1 and his learning board was a 145 JP Funster (with centreboard) and he was using I think a 4.5 sail and only in light to moderate wind till he built up his strength/fitness to hang on to bigger sails. The catch for a small beginner is that you really want the stability that goes with width, volume has eff all to do with it when you're 60kg. But, you're not going to be able to buy a 110 litre board that will be 85 wide so it's not too tippy and easy to learn on because they don't exist, to get that width you will need 145+ litres.

olskool
QLD, 760 posts
15 Jun 2018 4:16PM
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Nothing wrong with any Raceboard either. 5-25 kts windrange. Centreboard= upwind fun, not restricted to back n forth, just mowing the grass. Much much more Time On Water when learning. Easy to teach yourself. Self rescue is easy.(practised recently with sandstone Wally crew) No crossed up putt putt schloggin action. At 60kg a raceboard will plane easily in lightwinds. Quite possibly be a cheaper option as well. If youve never sailed, any board with a centreboard will be a great advantage, if only so you can sail just about any direction you wish in any wind.
Sails- 4to5m RAF or wave style.
+1 Funster/ Explorer.

Imax1
VIC, 1292 posts
15 Jun 2018 5:24PM
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+2 funster

Faff
VIC, 593 posts
15 Jun 2018 6:16PM
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Paddles B'mere said..
Most of our Sandstone crew are "big boned" except for Parso who has been learning with us over the last 12 months or so. He is your size bkellis1 and his learning board was a 145 JP Funster (with centreboard) and he was using I think a 4.5 sail and only in light to moderate wind till he built up his strength/fitness to hang on to bigger sails. The catch for a small beginner is that you really want the stability that goes with width, volume has eff all to do with it when you're 60kg. But, you're not going to be able to buy a 110 litre board that will be 85 wide so it's not too tippy and easy to learn on because they don't exist, to get that width you will need 145+ litres.


The 120L RRD Firemove (the board that started the Freemove trend) is 236 long x 79 wide. I think that's big enough. Freemove boards are very stable for their volume.

TGale
TAS, 245 posts
15 Jun 2018 6:56PM
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Starboard Rio S would also be a great option. I got one for the kids to learn on, which they did, and then found it is quite fun for me at 80kg. Great for learning the basics and also has a moderate turn of speed. Found it great for getting my gybe technique happening. Has retracting center board.

www.star-board-windsurfing.com/2017/products/boards/rio

Paddles B'mere
QLD, 1526 posts
15 Jun 2018 9:10PM
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^^^ I agree, the Starboard Rio is an awesome board and if a longboard is of interest, these new WOD LT's would be well worth a look as a learning board that you'd just keep for life.

windsufering
VIC, 588 posts
15 Jun 2018 10:25PM
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Mate get yourself a windsurfer Lt and be a part o th biggest sailing class in Aust
170 boards have been sold in Aust so far
170 people can't be wrong

NCUSAGUY
41 posts
15 Jun 2018 9:52PM
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There is no one correct answer. It just depends on your interest, finances, and commitment (and body weight). The easiest board to learn on (150+L, wide, and a dagger) will be the least likely long term board to keep (unless you have a family that wants to play and not get serious). The best long term use board (less volume, narrower and no dagger) will be much harder to learn on, but may be a keeper for many years.

It's about choices, so consider where you want to be with windsurfing 5 years from now. Cruising in light winds or having a trailer filled with gear and sailing in high winds (20-30 knots) on a 80L board with a 4m sail.

forceten
343 posts
15 Jun 2018 9:54PM
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As you can read , lots of opinions . What will be availabe is going to enter at some point.
Chosing a absolute beginner board, you will outgrow it, it can still be used as a light wind platform and have fun days.
all the gear have plus and minus , money, use , ease of use, lightness , the list is quite long.

I think presenting possible boards , may be more helpful. Used or new enter also.

since no shops are near, do you have help in rigging and setting things up ?

sboardcrazy
NSW, 6215 posts
16 Jun 2018 2:39PM
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Simon100 said..
Isnt 150l absolutley massive at 60kg , thats weight plus 90L. Wouldnt weight plus 40L be fine and open up a heap more options. Dont be afraid to use a larger sail if the wind is light, you wont learn to plane if the sail is simply to small to plane. Th suitable board depends alot on your fitness and what you hope to acheive if you want to put effort in to learning go smaller, if you want to just float around 3 times a year maybe a 150l would be good





Not for a learner.. my biggest board is + 50 over my weight and I find it tippy to gybe if the wind drops off in slop.( I'm c 65kgs).
Mines a 111ltre 68cm wide. I am using a heavier twin cam 7.5m sail.

bkellis1
9 posts
16 Jun 2018 9:54PM
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Ok, sorry for the long list of boards but this is what I have it narrowed down to so far based on my internet review and all of your suggestions:

Starboard Go 175 (175 liters, 268 cm length, 83 cm width)
Starboard Rio M (192 liters, 290 cm length, 81 cm width)
Bic Beach 160D (160 liters, 255 cm length, 82 cm width)
Bic Beach 185D (185 liters, 293 cm length, 79 cm width)
Bic Techno 160D (160 liters, 254 cm length, 81 cm width)
Bic Techno 185D (185 liters, 290 cm length, 79 cm width)
Bic Techno 293 OD DTT (205 liters, 293 cm length, 79 cm width)
Fanatic Viper 80 (190 liters, 280 cm length, 80 cm width)
Fanatic Viper 85 (220 liters, 285 cm length, 85 cm width)
JP Explorer 165 (165 liters, 275 cm length, 75 cm width)
JP Explorer 195 (195 liters, 280 cm length, 82.5 cm width)
JP Funster 160 (160 liters, 258 cm length, 80 cm width)
JP Funster 180 (180 liters, 258 cm length, 91 cm width)
Kona Hula (264 liters, 294 cm length, 87.6 cm width)

Here's my questions now:

1) in cases where I show multiple boards by the same manufacturer, which would be the better board? For example, the Go vs. the Rio, the Beach vs. Techno and finally Explorer vs. Funster? I need something for a beginner but will be fun for longer than 6 months.

2) then to take that one step further, which board across all manufacturers would be best? For example, Starboard is better than Bic, but Fanatic is best, or whatever.

3) for cases where I have the same board listed but different sizes, which would you recommend for my size (60 kg). Is there a point where volume becomes an issue (too much) or should I be more concerned with width of board? And if width is of primary concern for stability, is there a point where being too wide becomes an issue? I think I like the idea of a wide board to make it easier to learn initially, but I don't want to buy something that I will regret in 6 months due to performance issues after I get past the initial learning curve of just getting up and going.

Simon100
QLD, 461 posts
17 Jun 2018 12:26AM
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sboardcrazy said..

Simon100 said..
Isnt 150l absolutley massive at 60kg , thats weight plus 90L. Wouldnt weight plus 40L be fine and open up a heap more options. Dont be afraid to use a larger sail if the wind is light, you wont learn to plane if the sail is simply to small to plane. Th suitable board depends alot on your fitness and what you hope to acheive if you want to put effort in to learning go smaller, if you want to just float around 3 times a year maybe a 150l would be good






Not for a learner.. my biggest board is + 50 over my weight and I find it tippy to gybe if the wind drops off in slop.( I'm c 65kgs).
Mines a 111ltre 68cm wide. I am using a heavier twin cam 7.5m sail.


When i started i had about 4 goes on a giant learner board then used a fast 120l free ride board from there and thats at 95kg the mistake i made was using only a 6m sail people recomend to begin a 7-7.5 was a way better size for my weight and the conditions. This all depends on the abilities of the sailor but if this learner is fit and good at sports at 60kg they are going to grow out of a 150l board with a 5m sail in about 3 hours.

bkellis1
9 posts
16 Jun 2018 10:41PM
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For the record, I am 50 years old, 5'8", 60kg and not very athletic. I'm active but never really been very good with sports. Love the idea of surfing, but no waves (no ocean) in my area, so windsurfing seemed like the next best thing. Not really looking to master any tricks, just get out and go fast and have some fun.

RichardG
WA, 1622 posts
16 Jun 2018 11:48PM
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bkellis1 said..
For the record, I am 50 years old, 5'8", 60kg and not very athletic. I'm active but never really been very good with sports. Love the idea of surfing, but no waves (no ocean) in my area, so windsurfing seemed like the next best thing. Not really looking to master any tricks, just get out and go fast and have some fun.




I reckon you should order a new Windsurfer LT. Which country are you in ?

windsurferclass.com/listino/

Imax1
VIC, 1292 posts
17 Jun 2018 9:04AM
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Any of those boards would do.
Go for the cheapest widest watertight one u can find .
Your going to ding , scratch and probably crunch it.
learn on it and smile , ( send photos )
When your up and running then spend money on something more specific.

Nelle
VIC, 24 posts
17 Jun 2018 11:53AM
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Simon100 said..

sboardcrazy said..


Simon100 said..
Isnt 150l absolutley massive at 60kg , thats weight plus 90L. Wouldnt weight plus 40L be fine and open up a heap more options. Dont be afraid to use a larger sail if the wind is light, you wont learn to plane if the sail is simply to small to plane. Th suitable board depends alot on your fitness and what you hope to acheive if you want to put effort in to learning go smaller, if you want to just float around 3 times a year maybe a 150l would be good







Not for a learner.. my biggest board is + 50 over my weight and I find it tippy to gybe if the wind drops off in slop.( I'm c 65kgs).
Mines a 111ltre 68cm wide. I am using a heavier twin cam 7.5m sail.



When i started i had about 4 goes on a giant learner board then used a fast 120l free ride board from there and thats at 95kg the mistake i made was using only a 6m sail people recomend to begin a 7-7.5 was a way better size for my weight and the conditions. This all depends on the abilities of the sailor but if this learner is fit and good at sports at 60kg they are going to grow out of a 150l board with a 5m sail in about 3 hours.


Most mere mortals will spend 50 hours becoming proficient on a 150 litre board. Comfortably in harness and footstraps, planning, tack and gybe. Short boards are a bitch to learn on and as a learner really limit your time on water as you will need perfect conditions. As Imax said any of the boards you listed would be fine. Modern learner boards can be hard to find second hand, so grab one that comes up. People tend to hang on to them, they are handy for pushing family and friends to try windsurfing and light wind freestyle ****ups.
Have fun, post pics

Mark _australia
WA, 17948 posts
17 Jun 2018 4:32PM
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NCUSAGUY said.. It's about choices, so consider where you want to be with windsurfing 5 years from now. Cruising in light winds or having a trailer filled with gear and sailing in high winds (20-30 knots) on a 80L board with a 4m sail.


Everybody assumes the former, gets addicted and ends up as the latter.
Then adds the former again...... and needs a bigger trailer.



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"New board: volume recommendations" started by bkellis1