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Self Rescue Thread

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Created by Gonewindsurfing247 > 9 months ago, 2 Mar 2016
Gonewindsurfing247
WA, 952 posts
2 Mar 2016 1:36PM
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These are all I could find, would be great if we could add to the list. Not sure how good the boom technique is because I had mine go on both sides and a paddle in was the only option.





DWh2l0__






NotWal
QLD, 6859 posts
2 Mar 2016 4:23PM
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Some handy stuff there.
I think the way he tied the extension to the mast foot could be better. If he kept the tether as short as possible the extension would sit on the plastic washer thingy under the mast foot and not punch holes in the deck.

JazzyandJase
QLD, 92 posts
2 Mar 2016 5:39PM
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It would be interesting to see somebody de-rig in the water rather than trying to tie the sail back to the board. In theory it's possible, in practice I struggle to picture it. It's a great thread to start, it will be great to see what people have got.

Gonewindsurfing247
WA, 952 posts
2 Mar 2016 3:48PM
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Found this, well explained but not a video.

www.windsport.com/how_to_article?news_id=1310


Gonewindsurfing247
WA, 952 posts
2 Mar 2016 3:52PM
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Interesting approach if you have a super wide board and light winds with no chop:



ikw777
QLD, 2995 posts
2 Mar 2016 6:09PM
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Of course everyone constantly checks their ujs and keeper lines don't they? And you have regular replacement schedule for them don't you? And you don't sail offshore with alloy booms do you?
And finally you all shared the number of the local volunteer coast guard didn't you?

musorianin
QLD, 200 posts
2 Mar 2016 8:51PM
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Interesting topic. A lot easier of course to slide the top end of your mast out rethread it upside down and then work it down in to the broken bottom half on a nice manicured law as opposed to bobbing around in heavy chop, white caps, 25 kt, no one in sight, possibly totally knackered to boot. Ikw makes an excellent point (although I do use an alloy boom for economic reasons). I'd add that when the chips are really down the board is your friend and you CAN float on it for a long time and paddle it a long way. If I'm out on my own I always have the mentality that if it goes really pear shaped I'll just write off the rig. (Going to inspect those alloy booms...)

whyner
NSW, 762 posts
2 Mar 2016 9:20PM
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I've had experience twice of universal failures a long way from safety.

The first time was twenty years ago in a 25-30kt breeze (cross shore) about 1 1/2 km from shore with small swell. I was a long way out doing jumps as there was no swell on the beach. I derigged tied the rig up as tight as I could and attempted to paddle in. With the amount of wind and side chop, it was impossible to make headway. Given the location I was (sharkies) and the amount of birds working and surface fish jumping, I ended up deciding to ditch my rig and get out of there. Although an expensive excercise I learnt a lot.

I had another failure a couple of years ago at our local bombie in over mast high waves and 15-20kts of wind. I decided to try and the tie around deck plate method and sail in to the beach. This would have worked. But I was on my 76l and I weigh 95kg so could only get a little bit at a time toward the long distance to the beach. I then decided to tie the downhaul rope to my back footstrap and just paddle the ****er to the rocks (about 500m by this time).

I paddle straight into the wind for the 500metres or so in only about 15 minutes. So my theory now is just to tie the rig to your straps. Take off your harness and start paddling!

Mark _australia
WA, 18965 posts
2 Mar 2016 9:42PM
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I have not watched them yet, but just asking to save me time....do I need a Labrador...?


JonesySail
QLD, 917 posts
2 Mar 2016 11:50PM
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My recent self rescue was quite simple....swim, and more swim, body surf, get rinsed, then repeat etc etc..
Ideally would have been nice to still be with my gear!

Have done the downhaul rope/Uni thing a few times over the years, works well.

mattspoonersurf
38 posts
3 Mar 2016 5:02AM
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Select to expand quote



Select to expand quote
NotWal said..
Some handy stuff there.
I think the way he tied the extension to the mast foot could be better. If he kept the tether as short as possible the extension would sit on the plastic washer thingy under the mast foot and not punch holes in the deck.



It is almost impossible to prevent it punching holes in the deck - I have used this technique a couple of times, it does work, just makes a mess of the board

MikeyS
VIC, 1419 posts
3 Mar 2016 12:34PM
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Not exactly a self-rescue, but not so long ago, just after I'd derigged, I saw a kiteboard drifting downwind form my launch. Thought I'd have a go at paddling out with just my board to retrieve it. Pharque- how hard is it. My board was about 58cm wide, so, unlike swimming, where you pull your stroke fairly close to the body, this was like paddling from your elbows with only your forearms moving, rather than using back, upper arm and shoulder muscles. I was shagged in less than 200 metres and had to abort the mission.

Moral of the story, self rescue by paddling is a bitch. Even tougher if you're lying on a rolled rig.

spurgeo
WA, 28 posts
3 Mar 2016 10:59AM
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I usually sail on a shallow reef 1.5km from shore and I've had most of these failures over the years; snapped boom arms, snapped board, broken masts, fins torn out, snapped mast tendons, plus wind dropping out while on a sinker board.

I always have the rope safety on the tendon, but even so, as others have said it still often punches a hole in the board, especially in rough conditions. I have wrapped my harness around it previously to protect the board.

Broken boom arm I have removed and put it on upside down for the side I needed to sail back to shore.

Mostly I just de-rig in the water, tie everything together with downhaul and outhaul rope (I always keep these pretty long), put it all on top of my board and paddle/swim in. It can be pretty tiring, especially treading water and trying not to lose anything while de-rigging (I tape my mast together with electrical tape when rigging, mainly to stop sand jamming and helps keep it together when rigging and this avoids having to keep track of both sections in the water).

I swim 1-1.5km, a couple of times a week in the pool which helps a lot being able to rely on that swimming fitness.

kodyn
WA, 65 posts
3 Mar 2016 11:04AM
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Mikey S,,,, yes it is.

Sailing an offshore winters day with one other (I know it was stupid). Broke my mast (Un experienced and first time sailing opposite tack so totally screwed up a jump). Before I could decipher what to do I noticed the land moving fast! Decided to de-rig, rolled up sail and placed everything on board. Jumped on and started paddling. Land was still moving rather quick. Could see my mate looking for me but due to winter swell he couldn't see me. His girlfriend was driving up and down the beach obviously looking for me as well. Ended up finally making it to land on the tip of point (If I missed it I would've ended up in China). My back and neck and arms were like jelly. Needless to say I crapped myself and haven't sailed on offshore wind since! Nor by myself.

Big Al
WA, 258 posts
3 Mar 2016 11:11AM
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ikw777 said..
Of course everyone constantly checks their ujs and keeper lines don't they? And you have regular replacement schedule for them don't you? And you don't sail offshore with alloy booms do you?
And finally you all shared the number of the local volunteer coast guard didn't you?


Who needs to check their UJ...? Pretty simple to use a permanent marker and write the date (or year) that you bought or replaced it.
Re-thread the keeper lines each time you replace the tendon joint. It's not rocket surgery......!
I go with: replace the tendon every year, replace the whole mast foot every second year. Sail on.

AB....

Macroscien
QLD, 4620 posts
3 Mar 2016 4:05PM
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I wonder if somebody, sometimes decided to drop the rig/ scarify it, jump on board to save themselves and paddle back to shores....

NotWal
QLD, 6859 posts
3 Mar 2016 10:04PM
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^ Yes Whyner said above that he abandoned his rig. I have heard of others doing it.
I remember a post by a bloke who carried a big party balloon with him to use as a buoy to tie to his rig if he ever had to chuck it.
I think a goon bag would be more durable.

stehsegler
WA, 2954 posts
3 Mar 2016 8:40PM
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kodyn said..
Ended up finally making it to land on the tip of point (If I missed it I would've ended up in China).


You do realize the country North of us is Indonesia?

JazzyandJase
QLD, 92 posts
4 Mar 2016 7:50AM
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So, I have learnt a bit here, thanks, namely I had better get a new tendon. I will replace the whole base at the end of the year, what is the best euro pin on the market? When I replace my extensions in a few years I will look at changing to MXT. But for now I'm on UXT.




kodyn
WA, 65 posts
4 Mar 2016 7:00AM
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stehsegler said..

kodyn said..
Ended up finally making it to land on the tip of point (If I missed it I would've ended up in China).



You do realize the country North of us is Indonesia?


Yeh mate. It was just a saying. I would've actually ended up on the Abrohlos Islands but I wont get technical lol



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"Self Rescue Thread" started by Gonewindsurfing247