Forums > Windsurfing General

Tips for Light Wind - Short Waveboards <230cm

Reply
Created by wind012 > 9 months ago, 16 Jul 2014
wind012
WA, 124 posts
16 Jul 2014 9:38PM
Thumbs Up

I have used plenty of dedicated waveboards over the last 15+yrs, but in the last 3 or 4 years I have just used freestyle-wave boards at about 85L. I am about 80kg.

However I just picked up a new dedicated waveboard 81L and 227cm. I have only used it a few times, but I am having problems whilst sailing in non-planing conditions with my 5.3m. With my previous boards in light winds (eg 2014 JP FSW 85), I could place my foot in front of the mastbase which would help prevent the board from turning upwind. However with the new board, if I place my foot in front of the mastbase, it is super-easy to sink the nose. If I keep my front foot behind the mastbase, then it has a strong feeling of turning upwind (more than my previous boards).

Heading out in gusty 3ft cross-off conditions was harder than ever :( Any ideas? Mastbase position? Fin? Just get used to it?

flatout
82 posts
17 Jul 2014 1:25AM
Thumbs Up

Have you tried to aim your toes on the front foot towards the tip of the board?

Mastbender
1868 posts
17 Jul 2014 5:28AM
Thumbs Up

Volume is only part of the equation, how that volume is distributed is the other part.
I've got a 92L Starboard Evo, and a 92L SOS Rocket, both dedicated wave boards, and they couldn't be more different in early planing. The Evo feels and planes like a 110L, and the SOS feels and planes like an 85L, in very light winds. The wider and thicker tail on the Evo, is what makes them so different.

stehsegler
WA, 2957 posts
17 Jul 2014 11:12AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
wind012 said..
I could place my foot in front of the mastbase which would help prevent the board from turning upwind. However with the new board, if I place my foot in front of the mastbase, it is super-easy to sink the nose. If I keep my front foot behind the mastbase, then it has a strong feeling of turning upwind (more than my previous boards).

Heading out in gusty 3ft cross-off conditions was harder than ever :( Any ideas? Mastbase position? Fin? Just get used to it?


What board do you have? A lot of the modern quad boards have more volume in the the front section to assist in keeping the board afloat.

That said here a few pointers. Firstly foot strap position on a waveboard should be a lot further forward than what you would have on a FSW. A good indicator is if you sail fully powered up on flat water and go downwind you should feel like you are standing a little bit to far to the front of the board. I found that setting is perfect for light wind wave sailing (obviously not fully powered up free riding).RE mast track position, most recent wave boards have a marking that indicates the "neutral" position (not sure what the exact name is). In a nutshell if you put your mast track in that spot it will work for most conditions. At least it does on the wave boards I have.

Also, in regards to volume. If you are starting out on wave boards you might benefits from having a bit more than your body weight. It's more important that you get out past the waves and have enough float and control to actually catch a wave then worry about what happens once you are on a wave. As you get better you will be able to go down in volume.

Big Al
WA, 258 posts
17 Jul 2014 1:35PM
Thumbs Up

I think you should consider a second board. If you are just chasing waves then a wave dedicated, multi fin 100ish litre board at least 60cm wide - they are the new black.
Schlog out with a 5.3m and rip it on the way in.
FSW's in the plus 100L are more geared towards blasting/freeriding imo.


AB....

Mark _australia
WA, 19088 posts
17 Jul 2014 1:37PM
Thumbs Up

Stehsegler its not his first waveboard and not planing conditions.


I say technique (sorry wind012)

In non planing conditions I have almost 100% weight on front foot (behind the mast). I think you just need to get used to a slightly revised stance

wind012
WA, 124 posts
17 Jul 2014 10:41PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
flatout said..
Have you tried to aim your toes on the front foot towards the tip of the board?


Thanks for the tip. I will give it a shot.

wind012
WA, 124 posts
17 Jul 2014 10:43PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Mastbender said..
Volume is only part of the equation, how that volume is distributed is the other part.
I've got a 92L Starboard Evo, and a 92L SOS Rocket, both dedicated wave boards, and they couldn't be more different in early planing. The Evo feels and planes like a 110L, and the SOS feels and planes like an 85L, in very light winds. The wider and thicker tail on the Evo, is what makes them so different.


Ok .. but my question wasn't about planing. Just some tips about plodding along a short waveboard with a short nose without much buoyancy when there isn't enough wind.

wind012
WA, 124 posts
17 Jul 2014 10:48PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
stehsegler said..
If you are starting out on wave boards you might benefits from having a bit more than your body weight. It's more important that you get out past the waves and have enough float and control to actually catch a wave then worry about what happens once you are on a wave. As you get better you will be able to go down in volume.


I have had quite a few waveboards over the years and they are all super easy to sail. Here is a few that come to mind ...
2012 Quatro Rhythm 83
2007 F2 Guerilla 82
2005 Goya Wave 81
2014 JP FSW 85 (well it is FSW but one of the most wave-biased FSWs)

wind012
WA, 124 posts
17 Jul 2014 10:52PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Mark _australia said..
Stehsegler its not his first waveboard and not planing conditions.
I say technique (sorry wind012)
In non planing conditions I have almost 100% weight on front foot (behind the mast). I think you just need to get used to a slightly revised stance


Thanks for taking the time to read accurately.

I guess you're right ... I might hit the coastal choppy water for a few sessions before the bigger waves ... that will give me some time to try to sort things out ..before trying to plod out in gusty holey wind with 3ft breaking waves in cross-off wind (obviously a bit harder than cross wind).

But it is good to hear your feedback for the front foot position & weight.

I had the mast in the middle of the mast-track .. maybe I'll experiment with that also.

jusavina
QLD, 1177 posts
18 Jul 2014 1:33PM
Thumbs Up

You may already been doing this but trying to keep your feet on the centre line of the board is important as well.
Also, keeping you feet as far apart as it is practically possible (and keeping some style ) helps to keep balance and steer the board more easily...

And on a personal side I have a lot of weight on the front foot as well.

P.C_simpson
WA, 1365 posts
18 Jul 2014 1:04PM
Thumbs Up

Just move your mast base a bit further forward, gives you a bit more room will also stop the board rounding up.



Subscribe
Reply

Forums > Windsurfing General


"Tips for Light Wind - Short Waveboards <230cm" started by wind012