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in search of the planing gybe

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Created by Windxtasy > 9 months ago, 2 Apr 2014
Windxtasy
WA, 3870 posts
2 Apr 2014 8:33PM
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I am a slow learner when it comes to gybing but I haven't given up hope. I can complete 80% of them now, but I am yet to come out planing as I always turn into the wind too much when flipping/catching the rig. I plane around nicely until I flip the rig.
I have done a couple of gybing courses this summer and I have improved my consistency but haven't nailed the planing exit yet.

Question 1. If I keep practicing gybes the same way will I slowly improve and the planing exits will happen? (I feel I am slowly improving but it's taking a lot longer than I had hoped to get a planing exit)

Question 2. Do I need to actively try to change what I am doing? When I do think about what I am doing and consciously try to change something I stuff up and fall in.

Question 3. How do I keep the front hand forward and keep the sail sheeted in hard at the same time? I seem to be able to do one or the other but not both at the same time? If I sheet in hard my weight is too far back. If I really get forward I can't sheet in fully. I feel if I could do both I would be in the right position to flip the rig at the right time and still have plenty of speed.

I start to change my feet and flip the rig around about when I am pointing down wind in strong wind and a little later for light wind. (step gybe) By the time I have finished catching the rig and have both hands on the boom I am usually pointing slightly upwind and have stalled.

Any suggestions welcome

paddymac
WA, 917 posts
2 Apr 2014 9:01PM
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OK, you know I'm certainly no expert at this Anita but sometimes the pros can be sooo far from us mere mortals they can miss stuff because it seems obvious to them. So with that disclaimer, here are a couple of things that I have found help just recently:

1. Differentiate between a planning gybe and a non planning gybe. They seem pretty different to me. If there is not enough wind for me to plane out of the gybe (at my skill level) I want to minimise the ground lost so I will look for a 180 degree gybe. If there is enough wind I'm going to look for a 90 degree gybe, broad reach to broad reach.

2. When exiting on a broad reach, after the flip... be still for a bit. What's the opposite of this??? What I used to do was try frantically to pump the sail and sheet in. Then one gybe exit (broad reach) I just hung on the boom (growler) and waited to feel the sail power up. I'm talking only one or two seconds. It felt sooo much easier. A couple of easier pumps after the sail is powered and all is good.

3. Weight off the feet. This is my most recent insight... Crappy conditions on a large freeride in a sloppy mess. I concentrated on downforce through the boom and enough bend in my knees to try and get a light feeling on my feet (the sort of light feet you aim for speed sailing off the wind). This seemed to allow the board to track better and handle the chop without massively losing speed

4. Nothing beats flat water. When you go to Liptons or wherever, don't waste it on speed runs Go for the planning gybe! The satisfaction will be awesome.

GusTee
NSW, 240 posts
3 Apr 2014 12:19AM
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I'm not a pro, far from it. But here's what works for me...
1. Enter with max speed, as broad as possible. Hit peak speed before initiating the gybe.
2. Carve gently to wash off minimal speed, keep the carve short, exit early, come out broad.
3. Rig the biggest sail you can just hold to help with acceleration on exit.
4. If all of the above are checked, I find technique for the flip is not so critical.

decrepit
WA, 9046 posts
2 Apr 2014 9:21PM
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Agree with paddy, my starboard gybes are no where near as good as my port gybes, (At mandurah port is in flat water, starboard in chop) so at Lilacs I did a lot of 90deg starboard gybes in dead flat water, coming out of a downwind run, would lay it over at max speed, step gybe and power up again downwind. They just seemed so easy, so continued doing this but slowly come in tighter and exited tighter. Not sure how I'll go back in chop though.

elmo
WA, 7875 posts
2 Apr 2014 9:36PM
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I found gybing a humungous sail helped me no end (9.5+)

The timing has to be spot on otherwise you wear the sail in the face, made gybiing with sall sails much easier.

Hardies and Decreps advice from years back from wave sailing still helps as well as others.

A gopro or someone filming you can help show whats going on as well.

boardsurfr
WA, 752 posts
2 Apr 2014 10:26PM
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Windxtasy said..

Question 1. If I keep practicing gybes the same way will I slowly improve and the planing exits will happen? (I feel I am slowly improving but it's taking a lot longer than I had hoped to get a planing exit)


Practice is important. My wife is a relatively fast learner. When she learned the planing jibe, she came out dry 50% of the time on one tack, and 90% of the time on the other tack, within a few days. But it was almost a year before she planed out of jibes with some consistency (but she also worked on other things than jibes when windsurfing).

The one thing you do not want to do is practice the wrong thing over and over again. Once you build the muscle memory for bad habits, learning to do things the right way becomes much harder. I constantly catch myself doing stupid things in jibes that I know are wrong, just because I did them for many years. I have also seen the progress of others in many 5-day windsurfing camps I attended. Almost always, the "never before" jibers progress a lot faster than those who tried to learn it on their own for years. Of course, there are exceptions, some people are very good at figuring things out on their own.

If you can get feedback from others on the water, that's great. GoPro or other video footage, as elmo suggested, is also very good. What we think we are doing is usually quite different from what the camera shows. You can also post jibe videos here to get specific feedback. For video instruction, I think Dasher's "12 Step Jibe" is the best. Considering how much difference there is in fun between a great jibe and a bad one, and how often you'll jibe when windsurfing, spending the $30 for the video is definitely worth it. Then, concentrate on one thing at a time while practicing your jibes.

Jupiter
2156 posts
3 Apr 2014 1:29AM
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***Question 3. How do I keep the front hand forward and keep the sail sheeted in hard at the same time? I seem to be able to do one or the other but not both at the same time? If I sheet in hard my weight is too far back. If I really get forward I can't sheet in fully. I feel if I could do both I would be in the right position to flip the rig at the right time and still have plenty of speed.

When you are ready to initiate the gybe,
(1). Move your front-hand a bit further away from the boom wishbone or boom head, ie. closer to your harness line.
(2). Move your back-hand as far as you can comfortably doing so toward the back of the boom.
(3). As you begin to carve, you sheet in with your back-hand closer towards your body, and keep your front-hand as straight as possible.
(4). As you do so, the front of the sail will be forced away from you, and also lean towards the front of the board. This is because as you sheet in hard, the only option for the boom, hence the sail, is to move forward along the axis of the board.

You will find that such an exaggerated movement will also force your board to carve, and your body weight will have to lean towards the inside rail.

(5). As you come out of the gybe, try not to change your foot position for as long as you are comfortable to do so. I fact, I find that by not switching foot position, I am forced to stay carving while flipping the sail. Mind you, you can sail "wrong-footed" for as long as you can.

Once you have the sail taken care of, and you are now sailing in the new direction you wanted, then change foot position, when you are ready.

A few things you must follow before a gybe...
(a). Go as fast as you can before initiating a gybe
(b). Sail on a "broad-reach" to gain even more speed
(c). Don't force or fight a gybe. Let the sail, your hands, and your body weight to follow through the gybe
(d). Don't ever panic and lean back. (Imagine riding a bicycle around the corner...You don't lean in the opposite direction). The moment you lean back either towards the end of the board, or towards the outside rail, you will lose it. This is because you stall the board by sinking the tail, or turning it away from the semi-circle.
(e). A long, sweeping gybe is good because you don't lose too much speed.

* Go through each one of those steps, incrementally. Remember what you have or have not done right, and learn through failures
* When you can string all those steps together, you have a good gybe.

waterpistol
NSW, 125 posts
3 Apr 2014 8:49AM
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The problem with learning to achieve a movement of any kind and in any sport is an overwhelming amount of information and tips going through the mind as you attempt to make it work. the purpose of relentless training in martial arts is about training the mind to react instantly without thinking because thinking about your move will get you into trouble. The same can be said for gybing as constantly practicing will eventually pay off. Just try to clear your mind relax and enjoy your sport and only focus on one point at a time. Try only focusing on keeping a smooth and constant curve to the gybe arc as thinking of foot placement or rig rotation can really interfere with achieving this critical part of maintaining speed throughout your gybe. Keep up the good work and good luck.

FormulaNova
NSW, 8338 posts
3 Apr 2014 10:24AM
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I think Safety Bay is the ideal place to learn gybing, at least in Summer anyway.

One tip that finally clicked with me this year is that instead of trying hard to sheet in with the back hand, push the front arm out while sheeting in with the rear. By pushing the front out, you need far less distance to sheet in with the back hand. I think this answers your question 3.

For me, by starting to gybe and not completing the turn actually helped. I would turn, point down the sandbar, still planing, which would give me time to think about how far I would turn. The amount to turn is always less than you think. Once you are planing and turned slightly, you can then exaggerate the turn, and you are done.

Kazza
TAS, 2214 posts
3 Apr 2014 10:28AM
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Don't think too much about it Anita. I don't know about the front hand forward bit. I sail with a front underhand grip, then when about to start the gybe I flip the hand over to a front overhand grip but my front hand is always in the same position of normal sailing, it's my backhand I slide down the back of the boom a little just before the turn and sheet in with that hand, not hard, but enough to keep the board moving through the turn and give the sail a light feeling (you notice that more with wavesails I find) and keep the rig away from you too with the front hand by having it straight, bend zee knees (probably feel like your really exagerating the bent knees) really pressing on that inside rail with your back foot. When flipping the sail keep looking forward to where you are going don't look at what your doing, and keep the nose of the board pointing downwind slightly while you flipping your foot over as well and you sort of get the feeling your going to catapult, the sail feels full, but hang in there, keep the board planning and when you feel your moving forward nicely then point the nose and rig around to your normal sailing angle.
And practice makes perfect. I find that all doesn't work in light wind gybing though, the board rounds up and you stall, pretty normal I'ld say. Edit- or even practice keeping the board pointing downwind in your exit for a light wind gybe, force it to point downwind with your feet even if you fall in heaps you'll get the feeling.
Hope that helps or just even makes sense.
Thinking again, maybe don't worry about the sheeting in bit of the sail until you have a planning exit, focus on that first then you can start concentrating on the sail. Swap your feet around while flipping the sail and straight away concentrate on keeping the nose downwind slightly. I'll shut up now......

sboardcrazy
NSW, 6488 posts
3 Apr 2014 12:16PM
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I find I can do planing gybes easier with changing the feet after the flip with small gear - 5m sails and smaller + 95ltre boards and smaller e.g - 20kts + wind..You have to be well powered up.That way there is one less step to unsettle the board as you carve. It's probably better to learn the step gybe though as it puts you in a more stable position to handle the power exiting
I found once I started learning the step gybe my gybes took a big step backwards for a while. I'm slowly coming out the other side but it's taken a while and I can now plane out on my previously bad side in flat water in ideal conditions.
Move both your hands back as you enter as you go to oversheet - us weaklings especially need as much help as we can get!
I find I still don't get forward enough in chop- I did a few times last year and it certainly feels right but it goes against all instincts!
I used to do a post mortem after every crash- mm didn't look at the exit, flipped too late etc.. look at the exit!! - If I stuff up you be sure I was watching my hands rather than where I wanted to go- it seems to put your body in the right spot and forward.
I used to hook in straight away after the gybe fearing catapults but I find if my arms are strong enough its better to do the missing link for a while and get things sorted before hooking in as it helps keep the speed up. This is easier in flatwater- in chop I'd probably still want to be hooked in early especially if overpowered.
Get a video or multishots of you gybing to see errors..best to practise good habits not bad.. I need this too..
Oh to have enough wind to practise planing gybes..

Roar
NSW, 470 posts
3 Apr 2014 1:42PM
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Here is some gybes from first person POV from Lake George in Feb - what an awesome day that was. 39.2 on a 59 wide slalom board !
The wind was a good 20-25 knots at this point of the day (went to 30+ later in the day)

these gybes were too wide to get a alpha 500 on them but they were averaging 23-24 on a wider range.



The 5th one the i laid sail a bit low and hit the water :)

Cheers
Roar

sboardcrazy
NSW, 6488 posts
3 Apr 2014 2:58PM
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Boy it looks easy when you do it!

Kazza
TAS, 2214 posts
3 Apr 2014 3:06PM
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Roar said..

Here is some gybes from first person POV from Lake George in Feb - what an awesome day that was. 39.2 on a 59 wide slalom board !
The wind was a good 20-25 knots at this point of the day (went to 30+ later in the day)

these gybes were too wide to get a alpha 500 on them but they were averaging 23-24 on a wider range.

?rel=0

The 5th one the i laid sail a bit low and hit the water :)

Cheers
Roar


Geeee wish my cams would flick around the mast that easily, have to give my sails one big hard pump to get the cams around or kick the bottom one around with my foot. Means there's no way I can do a strap to strap gybe with such tight cams. All step gybes with my race sails so I'm ready for the big pump at the end of the gybe.

RAL INN
VIC, 2673 posts
3 Apr 2014 3:28PM
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Lot of good stuff here.
Bearing away lots before you start actual gybe is good
Once you set inside rail keep it there so keep weight over it
Look where you want to go
And try the feet after flip thing a few times, it may not end up as your favourite technique but as a drill it will help.
The more relaxed you are the easier planing out seems to be.

Windxtasy
WA, 3870 posts
3 Apr 2014 3:11PM
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Thanks for all those ideas friends! It seems most of you took the "suggestions welcome" option rather than answering the questions directly (you would have been marked down if this was an essay question!) but I get the impression that I do need to actively change a few things rather than continue on in the same way and hope that practice will cause things to come good eventually. Thank you Jupiter and Formula Nova for answering question 3.

Roar, yes, that's what I am aiming for!
S'board crazy - I think I may not have any more good planing gybe practice sessions this season. Monday was a bonus, and Formula Nova, it was at Safety Bay, 16 - 18 knots, really flat. There was just enough water to gybe over the bar but a few fin scrapes were making me nervous.
Going in with speed - I guess I tend to do speed sailing on the really windy days and keep my gybe practice for the more ordinary or marginal days, so on my practice days I am never going in really fast. Probably around 20 knots at best. I have to admit that if I am going really fast I get too scared to gybe . Most of my injuries and board injuries have come from overpowered gybe attempts, and often when it is really windy I am fatigued or arm weary and decide it would be risky to gybe and safer to just stop and catch my breath.

Patrick & Decrepit - I do tend to do 180 degree gybes rather than 90 degree gybes, so I don't lose too much ground downwind. As an exercise I shall concentrate on the 90 degree gybe for a bit, and work on keeping the board heading down wind after the rig flip, then tighten it up once I have that happening.

I don't think I need to concentrate on the carve - carving around too far is my problem if anything. My footwork isn't a problem. That is so automatic I don't have to think about it at all. It would take a great effort not to change my feet.

So things to work on next time there is some consistent wind - practice gybing in strong wind before I get tired, to really get some speed up.
On the less windy days go for the 90 degree gybe with a good broad reach to start with
Work on keeping the board pointing downwind during/after the flip
Don't hook in until I am planing again on the new tack.
I suspect I need to pull the sail forward more when I grab the new side of the boom, to keep my weight forward and on the front foot. Weightlin gthe back foot pushes the back of the board around too far.

More ideas welcome...

sboardcrazy
NSW, 6488 posts
3 Apr 2014 6:23PM
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Windxtasy said..

Thanks for all those ideas friends! It seems most of you took the "suggestions welcome" option rather than answering the questions directly (you would have been marked down if this was an essay question!) but I get the impression that I do need to actively change a few things rather than continue on in the same way and hope that practice will cause things to come good eventually. Thank you Jupiter and Formula Nova for answering question 3.

Roar, yes, that's what I am aiming for!
S'board crazy - I think I may not have any more good planing gybe practice sessions this season. Monday was a bonus, and Formula Nova, it was at Safety Bay, 16 - 18 knots, really flat. There was just enough water to gybe over the bar but a few fin scrapes were making me nervous.
Going in with speed - I guess I tend to do speed sailing on the really windy days and keep my gybe practice for the more ordinary or marginal days, so on my practice days I am never going in really fast. Probably around 20 knots at best. I have to admit that if I am going really fast I get too scared to gybe . Most of my injuries and board injuries have come from overpowered gybe attempts, and often when it is really windy I am fatigued or arm weary and decide it would be risky to gybe and safer to just stop and catch my breath.

Patrick & Decrepit - I do tend to do 180 degree gybes rather than 90 degree gybes, so I don't lose too much ground downwind. As an exercise I shall concentrate on the 90 degree gybe for a bit, and work on keeping the board heading down wind after the rig flip, then tighten it up once I have that happening.

I don't think I need to concentrate on the carve - carving around too far is my problem if anything. My footwork isn't a problem. That is so automatic I don't have to think about it at all. It would take a great effort not to change my feet.

So things to work on next time there is some consistent wind - practice gybing in strong wind before I get tired, to really get some speed up.
On the less windy days go for the 90 degree gybe with a good broad reach to start with
Work on keeping the board pointing downwind during/after the flip
Don't hook in until I am planing again on the new tack.
I suspect I need to pull the sail forward more when I grab the new side of the boom, to keep my weight forward and on the front foot. Weightlin gthe back foot pushes the back of the board around too far.

More ideas welcome...


From what Guy says the turning up into the wind /going upwind after the gybe is usually caused from errors earlier in the gybe..entry etc
Having said that like Kazza says I tend to round up after most of my gybes in marginal winds..maybe I need to work on the arc more then although a lot are subplaning.

albers
NSW, 1634 posts
3 Apr 2014 7:52PM
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Windxtasy said..

Question 1. If I keep practicing gybes the same way will I slowly improve and the planing exits will happen? (I feel I am slowly improving but it's taking a lot longer than I had hoped to get a planing exit)

Einstein once defined Insanity as "doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results" Answer: No

Question 2. Do I need to actively try to change what I am doing? When I do think about what I am doing and consciously try to change something I stuff up and fall in.

Answer (Part 1): Yes. Answer (Part 2): Try to "save the move" by adjusting to the circumstances of each gybe.

Question 3. How do I keep the front hand forward and keep the sail sheeted in hard at the same time? I seem to be able to do one or the other but not both at the same time? If I sheet in hard my weight is too far back. If I really get forward I can't sheet in fully. I feel if I could do both I would be in the right position to flip the rig at the right time and still have plenty of speed.

Answer: Don't specifically "sheet in" - just make sure that the sail remains in the same position relative to the wind direction as you move through "the carve". Also, maintain mast foot pressure by leaning slightly forward so that the board remains level (sinking the tail slows everything down).


Also, the more you maintain speed through the gybe, the easier (and quicker) the rig flip becomes.

Cheers

powersloshin
NSW, 1001 posts
3 Apr 2014 9:12PM
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I read Peter Hart saying that what makes you jibe successfully in the beginning (staying dry), will hinder later when you want to do planing jibes. It is true that we hate falling in and tend to stay safe, but that risk is necessary to progress. I see the people that are really good take it aggressively and quickly. I don't offer any tips/answers because I am not good enough.

shoodbegood
VIC, 712 posts
3 Apr 2014 11:04PM
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Look at 18 secs and 48 secs on Roars video
The front hand moves right up to the mast, this helped me heaps!
Such a small thing, but the rig is so much easier to flip, it made all the difference

paddymac
WA, 917 posts
3 Apr 2014 9:24PM
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Dean 424
NSW, 439 posts
4 Apr 2014 11:47AM
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I only grade myself as a fairly intermediate sailor but for my 20 cents worth, I never got a planing gybe until I started doing step gybes as I would always stall the tail. There is heaps of good advice here, but the main thing I try and concentrate bending the knees into the turn, really weighting my front hand trying to push the uni through the bottom of the board and really leaning into the turn getting my chest higher than the boom (as I'm my toes on front foot), I flip the sail just before it feels weightless and my back foot moves forward at same time. As the sail has flipped I stand straighter and give the rig a big pump, (staying low now) this normally keeps me on the plane just when the board was thinking about giving up. Once a bit steadier more upright stance a couple pumps with the back hand, in the harness and then back upwind the last 20 to 30 degrees.

Kazza
TAS, 2214 posts
4 Apr 2014 1:54PM
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So Anita you have 2 months to nail your planning gybes so you'll be ready for Green Island this year

wintortree
NSW, 194 posts
4 Apr 2014 2:03PM
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There is some great advise on here for planning gybes.

2 things theta really help my brother I to get them dialed

Firstly you need to focus on your exit and look where you want to go. Your exit needs to be way more down wind then you think. If you look up to the board reach you will keep turning and stall the board out.
Think about getting back in the straps befor you start to head back upwind.

The 2nd advice is to flip the sail so much earlier then you think. This way you will be able to get the power on sooner and the power will come on when you still heading down wind on the exit.


And speed is your friend. Good luck and you will be stoked when you pull one at Mac speed. It's a great feeling.

Windxtasy
WA, 3870 posts
4 Apr 2014 12:08PM
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Kazza said..

So Anita you have 2 months to nail your planning gybes so you'll be ready for Green Island this year



Usually we are lucky if we get any wind during the next two months, let alone planing winds!

aaah Green Island...

Windxtasy
WA, 3870 posts
4 Apr 2014 12:25PM
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powersloshin said..

I read Peter Hart saying that what makes you jibe successfully in the beginning (staying dry), will hinder later when you want to do planing jibes. It is true that we hate falling in and tend to stay safe, but that risk is necessary to progress. I see the people that are really good take it aggressively and quickly. I don't offer any tips/answers because I am not good enough.


This is probably my basic problem - I am never aggressive, I do like to play it safe and stay dry and uninjured. When I do make changes I have to introduce them slowly and bit by bit, I can't make myself just go for it - partly because I am not co-ordinated enough to get it right. I can't do things fast and accurately. Careful and controlled is my natural style.

Anyway some very helpful advice here, just need some wind to practice (I should have asked this question a month ago when there was still some wind about) Condensing the ideas above -
My plan is if we get any strong wind, to practice gybing before I get tired, to really get some speed up.
On the less windy days go for the 90 degree gybe with a good broad reach to start with.
Work on increased mast foot pressure & keeping the sail forward
Don't worry so much about sheeting in
Work on keeping the board pointing downwind during/after the flip
Look downwind of the exit, not where I want to end up
pull the sail forward more when I grab the new side of the boom
Give a good pump after flipping the rig to stay on the plane
Footstraps before hooking in.
and then some small pumps before hooking in
Expect to fall in a lot

Does that sound about right?

sboardcrazy
NSW, 6488 posts
4 Apr 2014 3:41PM
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Windxtasy said..

powersloshin said..

I read Peter Hart saying that what makes you jibe successfully in the beginning (staying dry), will hinder later when you want to do planing jibes. It is true that we hate falling in and tend to stay safe, but that risk is necessary to progress. I see the people that are really good take it aggressively and quickly. I don't offer any tips/answers because I am not good enough.


This is probably my basic problem - I am never aggressive, I do like to play it safe and stay dry and uninjured. When I do make changes I have to introduce them slowly and bit by bit, I can't make myself just go for it - partly because I am not co-ordinated enough to get it right. I can't do things fast and accurately. Careful and controlled is my natural style.

Anyway some very helpful advice here, just need some wind to practice (I should have asked this question a month ago when there was still some wind about) Condensing the ideas above -
My plan is if we get any strong wind, to practice gybing before I get tired, to really get some speed up.
On the less windy days go for the 90 degree gybe with a good broad reach to start with.
Work on increased mast foot pressure & keeping the sail forward
Don't worry so much about sheeting in
Work on keeping the board pointing downwind during/after the flip
Look downwind of the exit, not where I want to end up
pull the sail forward more when I grab the new side of the boom
Give a good pump after flipping the rig to stay on the plane
Footstraps before hooking in.
and then some small pumps before hooking in
Expect to fall in a lot

Does that sound about right?


Sounds good..have fun remembering it all! I can relate to not being aggressive enough .My gybes in chop aren't as good as they could be as I am a bit timid and don't get forward enough.After catching a rail a few times entering and having some painful stacks..
My riding instructor used to get me angry so I'd get more assertive with the horse - it worked!

Kazza
TAS, 2214 posts
4 Apr 2014 7:02PM
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The thought of falling in and getting eaten rapidly improved my gybes So think of sharks, that will get you aggressive .......or terrified!

How about you put a video of you gybing on this post, then we can really see whats going on

Windxtasy
WA, 3870 posts
4 Apr 2014 5:20PM
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Kazza said..

The thought of falling in and getting eaten rapidly improved my gybes So think of sharks, that will get you aggressive .......or terrified!

How about you put a video of you gybing on this post, then we can really see whats going on


I haven't even got a photo of me windsurfing, let alone a video.

RumChaser
TAS, 600 posts
5 Apr 2014 9:37AM
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It seems silly now but a thing I was doing wrong was how I used to change hands. I was crossing my new front hand on top of the old one instead of under. This made me stand up and raised my weight just when I should of been lowering it and getting power into the sail. Made a huge difference in getting into position faster on the exit.

sboardcrazy
NSW, 6488 posts
6 Apr 2014 2:14PM
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Windxtasy said..

Kazza said..

The thought of falling in and getting eaten rapidly improved my gybes So think of sharks, that will get you aggressive .......or terrified!

How about you put a video of you gybing on this post, then we can really see whats going on


I haven't even got a photo of me windsurfing, let alone a video.


Get some! I got RSI at 44 and thought I'd never sail again.. I don't have any decent shots of me in the surf or XCD skiing..I really regret that. You don't know what's around the corner so if you want memories in your old age get some pics!



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"in search of the planing gybe" started by Windxtasy