Forums > Wing Foiling General

Board gets flipped and the foil comes hurtling down...

Reply
Created by paulweller A week ago, 13 May 2022
paulweller
2 posts
13 May 2022 5:03AM
Thumbs Up

I'm new to the forum but have spent some time snooping around here-an invaluable forum for the community. Any input would be most appreciated.

In brief: I've been wing foiling for about six months-now riding consistently and crashing far less. I recently experienced two canopy tears on my Armstrong V2 2.5m in a week-crashing and having my board flipped in gusty (25-30kts) Maui waters, on both occasions. The Armstrong HS232 (un-cut) tail pierces through Teijin canopy with no resistance. I use a 7ft ankle-cuff surf leash but there is no guarantee that the board would end up at a comfortable distance when crashing-some have noted this on other posts related to this topic. What can one do to potentially prevent this from happening, if anything?
--
In detail: I've been wing foiling for about six months but have recently transitioned to a new foil setup and wing quiver. I started with a Naish S26 95L board, Naish S26 JET1650 foil setup (with 75cm AL mast), and a quiver of Ozone V2 wings. I still use the same board but have since transitioned to an Armstrong 1550V2/HS232 or V200 (with 85cm mast) foil setup and a quiver of Armstrong V2 wings. On both occasions, my board flipped in gusty (25-35kts) Maui waters onto my V2 2.5m wing. For it to happen once may be regarded as a misfortune; to happen twice looks like carelessness. I've been making sure to surface from a crash and stop my board from flipping over and/or ensure a safe distance from my wing. This usually works but chaos tends to ensue significantly quicker in windy conditions. I've heard hearsay that Aluula wings are much more durable and less likely for this sort of thing to happen. I've not used one myself but have used the Reedin SuperwingX. The x-ply used is more durable than Teijin with respect to withstanding piercing damage (obviously) but that wing is probably better suited for racing rather than riding around and dabbling in a bit of luffed-out surf-that's just my beginner opinion. I'd happily pay more for wings that could withstand the occasional poke. I have access to a very good professional repair service but would like to avoid having wings with more stitching than actual canopy material.
--
Observations: My Armstrong gear is fantastic but I've made a few observations with respect to the way that the (my) foil and wings behave in windy conditions (note: this is almost a non-issue for me in lighter conditions but I acknowledge that this sort of thing can still happen).

Foil: My Armstrong setup, in comparison to my previous Naish setup, is significantly lighter. When attached to a relatively large board (95L, 5'7"x27.5") and used in windy conditions, I've noticed that the board is significantly more likely to be flipped over, whether in surf or not. The 'surface area' of the board for wind to act upon is probably large enough to easily expose the foil. I presume that a smaller board is less likely to be flipped over (I weigh 82kg so am thinking of sizing down to something in 70-80L range). Similarly, I presume that the length of the mast and the size and weight of the front wing affects the lever force of the load that comes hurtling down. Thoughts?

Wing: My Armstrong V2 wings really stick to the water when flipped over. I presume that there is some relationship between the lack of dihedral in the LE (note: my uneducated guess is that 'flatter' wings probably have quicker power delivery as there is more tension for the canopy to act against). The Ozone V2 wings have a good amount of dihedral so tend to just fly up even when flipped over-that is, there is enough of an 'opening' for air to pass through the wing and water surface to allow for it to unstick. I've been able to maneuver the wing away from a flipping board on a few occasions. I think it's fair to compare the two wings to this end since they both use Dacron and Teijin (the addition of x-ply and aramid in the Armstrong V2 wings adds a negligible amount of weight and is minimal in coverage overall). The material characteristics when in the water should be the same. Thoughts?

King Crash
NSW, 193 posts
13 May 2022 8:02AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
paulweller said..
I'm new to the forum but have spent some time snooping around here-an invaluable forum for the community. Any input would be most appreciated.

In brief: I've been wing foiling for about six months-now riding consistently and crashing far less. I recently experienced two canopy tears on my Armstrong V2 2.5m in a week-crashing and having my board flipped in gusty (25-30kts) Maui waters, on both occasions. The Armstrong HS232 (un-cut) tail pierces through Teijin canopy with no resistance. I use a 7ft ankle-cuff surf leash but there is no guarantee that the board would end up at a comfortable distance when crashing-some have noted this on other posts related to this topic. What can one do to potentially prevent this from happening, if anything?
--
In detail: I've been wing foiling for about six months but have recently transitioned to a new foil setup and wing quiver. I started with a Naish S26 95L board, Naish S26 JET1650 foil setup (with 75cm AL mast), and a quiver of Ozone V2 wings. I still use the same board but have since transitioned to an Armstrong 1550V2/HS232 or V200 (with 85cm mast) foil setup and a quiver of Armstrong V2 wings. On both occasions, my board flipped in gusty (25-35kts) Maui waters onto my V2 2.5m wing. For it to happen once may be regarded as a misfortune; to happen twice looks like carelessness. I've been making sure to surface from a crash and stop my board from flipping over and/or ensure a safe distance from my wing. This usually works but chaos tends to ensue significantly quicker in windy conditions. I've heard hearsay that Aluula wings are much more durable and less likely for this sort of thing to happen. I've not used one myself but have used the Reedin SuperwingX. The x-ply used is more durable than Teijin with respect to withstanding piercing damage (obviously) but that wing is probably better suited for racing rather than riding around and dabbling in a bit of luffed-out surf-that's just my beginner opinion. I'd happily pay more for wings that could withstand the occasional poke. I have access to a very good professional repair service but would like to avoid having wings with more stitching than actual canopy material.
--
Observations: My Armstrong gear is fantastic but I've made a few observations with respect to the way that the (my) foil and wings behave in windy conditions (note: this is almost a non-issue for me in lighter conditions but I acknowledge that this sort of thing can still happen).

Foil: My Armstrong setup, in comparison to my previous Naish setup, is significantly lighter. When attached to a relatively large board (95L, 5'7"x27.5") and used in windy conditions, I've noticed that the board is significantly more likely to be flipped over, whether in surf or not. The 'surface area' of the board for wind to act upon is probably large enough to easily expose the foil. I presume that a smaller board is less likely to be flipped over (I weigh 82kg so am thinking of sizing down to something in 70-80L range). Similarly, I presume that the length of the mast and the size and weight of the front wing affects the lever force of the load that comes hurtling down. Thoughts?

Wing: My Armstrong V2 wings really stick to the water when flipped over. I presume that there is some relationship between the lack of dihedral in the LE (note: my uneducated guess is that 'flatter' wings probably have quicker power delivery as there is more tension for the canopy to act against). The Ozone V2 wings have a good amount of dihedral so tend to just fly up even when flipped over-that is, there is enough of an 'opening' for air to pass through the wing and water surface to allow for it to unstick. I've been able to maneuver the wing away from a flipping board on a few occasions. I think it's fair to compare the two wings to this end since they both use Dacron and Teijin (the addition of x-ply and aramid in the Armstrong V2 wings adds a negligible amount of weight and is minimal in coverage overall). The material characteristics when in the water should be the same. Thoughts?


Xply will pierce the laminate, but should experience resistance and stop at yarns. That being said, both are easy repairs. You shouldn't need a stitch in either.
I too have experienced the board flipping on a crash and ****ing your life up. I was jumping around, warming up and had a foot shoot out the back strap and board catapulted back to me. I pulled the wing overhead to protect me, cut right through it. Big swim with a sinking wing.
This taught me:
1. Don't wear a leash jumping. 2. ankle leashes whilst uncomfortable, will reduce the angle of recoil and should stop a board flipping. A waist leash as I've found, yes is much more comfortable and less likely to get in the way, induces more angle in a crash on the leash. You can get some weird, wacky catapults back at you. 3. only use small, short, thick leashes. 5ft pro comp board leashes 5mm and up. Too long a leash and you're allowing more energy to store and project back at you. I've had some bad crashes from the board shooting back at me, but I would always say, use a leash. I've tried to ride without one in big conditions and it's just scary trying to catch a board. A friend did this and had many sessions ruined by loosing his board and having to swim in after it.

paulweller
2 posts
13 May 2022 8:59AM
Thumbs Up

Thanks for the reply, King Crash. I always use an ankle leash--the foil just makes it that much easier for the wind to send a few thousand dollars hopelessly downwind. I'm going to try a shorter leash.

Pacey
WA, 507 posts
13 May 2022 10:01AM
Thumbs Up

The other thing is that the tips of the 232 are quite pointed and sharp. Take a few mm off the tips to blunten them, doesn't affect performance but makes them a lot less likely to damage your gear or your toes

felix1111
59 posts
13 May 2022 12:37PM
Thumbs Up

what about leash connected to the front of the board?

dapara2004
44 posts
13 May 2022 1:03PM
Thumbs Up

I've had a board flip and put a hole in a wing. Same foils. I ended up using a longer wing leash and letting go so it is well downwind of my foil. I use a reel board leash and that also helps.

CH3MTR4IL5
WA, 556 posts
13 May 2022 2:55PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
felix1111 said..
what about leash connected to the front of the board?


I tried this on my starboard which has a front leash connection - more out of curiosity because it was there than anything. Was not a fan- it seemed the board was much more likely to come charging towards me without the brake that comes from the leash at the back.

fwiw, i have not had any board flip issues with a 4'7"/65L and armstrong ha/232 setup in similar conditions to what you're describing

Gorgo
VIC, 4745 posts
14 May 2022 11:20AM
Thumbs Up

I tried all sorts of long/short/waist/ankle leash configurations and none of them make much difference in the long term. During a crash the board and wing rarely end up neatly streamed out at the end of the leash. Many times after a crash I can be in the water wondering where my board is and find it's upwind behind me or under the wing or surfing down a wave to bonk the back of my helmet.

A smaller board makes it less likely for it to settle with the board down and the foil up, but it can still happen. Even if it doesn't settle, it just has to be upside down for a second then roll over at the wrong time and the wing is skewered. Equally bad is the wing flopping over and impaling itself on the foil. The first (and only time) it happened to me was with a big fat roundy low aspect foil. Sharpness of the foil makes not much difference. My pointy high aspect foil landed in the canopy last session and just sat there with no damage.

Simply put, anything that can happen will happen. All you can do is get better at foiling so you crash less often. Even that is problematic. Riding fast and aggressively can make for some interesting stacks especially if waves are involved. Statistically theres a heap less crashes but you're out on the water more so the total number can be the same or greater.

It's fairly important to not be too emotionally invested in your gear, especially wings. Learn to repair them (taping canopy fabric is easy) and learn to love the battle scarred pirate look. Black tape repairs look the best.

One thing I have done a few times is to climb up on top of the wing so it doesn't flip itself, and that frees arms and legs to fend off the wing. That relies on you being aware of imminent impalement and taking appropriate action quickly enough.

airsail
QLD, 881 posts
14 May 2022 1:17PM
Thumbs Up

Narrow board (22" wide) will help, less windage to flip the board. A heavier foil makes it sink quicker, but obviously not desired. I've had boards flip when riding larger wings but since moving to the 1040HA and narrow board I've never had a flip, even when on my 2.5mtr wing.

JohnnyTsunami
49 posts
14 May 2022 11:23AM
Thumbs Up

Send the board downwind and fall upwind with the wing. If you have to kick it upwind, don't kick it hard and try to fly downwind a bit with the wing.

paulweller2
19 posts
14 May 2022 12:26PM
Thumbs Up

Thanks ever so much for the responses. I'm the original poster; I had to make a new account since the website kept indicating that my password was incorrect. I'm a new user so maybe it thought I was a bot. I made a new account so that I can respond to this thread.

paulweller2
19 posts
14 May 2022 12:31PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Pacey said..
The other thing is that the tips of the 232 are quite pointed and sharp. Take a few mm off the tips to blunten them, doesn't affect performance but makes them a lot less likely to damage your gear or your toes


Thanks, Pacey. I was just talking to someone today who had a recent canopy tear with one of the new (fairly blunt) Naish MA foils. He even sanded the corners thinking that it might help. I might sand my 232 and/or get a second 232 that I could chop shop.

paulweller2
19 posts
14 May 2022 12:34PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
dapara2004 said..
I've had a board flip and put a hole in a wing. Same foils. I ended up using a longer wing leash and letting go so it is well downwind of my foil. I use a reel board leash and that also helps.


Thanks for the input. I just modified my Armstrong waist leash by attaching the wrist leash bungee bit so that I can 'extend' the wing leash by pulling the quick release. I gave it a few tests today--worked brilliantly. Wipeouts don't always go to plan, however. I'd like to post a picture of it but I'm still new so don't think I can.

paulweller2
19 posts
14 May 2022 12:39PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
CH3MTR4IL5 said..

felix1111 said..
what about leash connected to the front of the board?



I tried this on my starboard which has a front leash connection - more out of curiosity because it was there than anything. Was not a fan- it seemed the board was much more likely to come charging towards me without the brake that comes from the leash at the back.

fwiw, i have not had any board flip issues with a 4'7"/65L and armstrong ha/232 setup in similar conditions to what you're describing


I'm considering an Armstrong FG SUP 75L (5'2") or a PPC Soar 68L (4'8"). My priority is to just fall less so that this sort of thing is a minor worry.

paulweller2
19 posts
14 May 2022 12:54PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Gorgo said..
I tried all sorts of long/short/waist/ankle leash configurations and none of them make much difference in the long term. During a crash the board and wing rarely end up neatly streamed out at the end of the leash. Many times after a crash I can be in the water wondering where my board is and find it's upwind behind me or under the wing or surfing down a wave to bonk the back of my helmet.

A smaller board makes it less likely for it to settle with the board down and the foil up, but it can still happen. Even if it doesn't settle, it just has to be upside down for a second then roll over at the wrong time and the wing is skewered. Equally bad is the wing flopping over and impaling itself on the foil. The first (and only time) it happened to me was with a big fat roundy low aspect foil. Sharpness of the foil makes not much difference. My pointy high aspect foil landed in the canopy last session and just sat there with no damage.

Simply put, anything that can happen will happen. All you can do is get better at foiling so you crash less often. Even that is problematic. Riding fast and aggressively can make for some interesting stacks especially if waves are involved. Statistically theres a heap less crashes but you're out on the water more so the total number can be the same or greater.

It's fairly important to not be too emotionally invested in your gear, especially wings. Learn to repair them (taping canopy fabric is easy) and learn to love the battle scarred pirate look. Black tape repairs look the best.

One thing I have done a few times is to climb up on top of the wing so it doesn't flip itself, and that frees arms and legs to fend off the wing. That relies on you being aware of imminent impalement and taking appropriate action quickly enough.



Thanks for the excellent input! I did some testing over the last few days and ended up crashing whilst holding the wing, even with just one hand. This allowed me to surface knowing where the wind was so that I could figure out what my board was going to do. This obviously doesn't apply to every scenario but I felt like it gave me a little extra time to think.

I think you're absolutely spot on about not being too emotionally invested in the gear. I think one's progression--or the rate of it, anyway--will be seriously curtailed if unwilling to experience the wipeouts (and learn how to deal with their consequences). Safety first but this sport is not exactly without risk. I'm going to try the climb-on-wing rescue. I think it'll put me in a good position to stop the foil (my Kiwi Armie knife) should it come hurtling down.

paulweller2
19 posts
14 May 2022 1:47PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
airsail said..
Narrow board (22" wide) will help, less windage to flip the board. A heavier foil makes it sink quicker, but obviously not desired. I've had boards flip when riding larger wings but since moving to the 1040HA and narrow board I've never had a flip, even when on my 2.5mtr wing.


Thanks for the input. I might have to get a sinker board for windy days--the windy days here on Maui are consistent, albeit gusty, so it's unlikely that the wind will just die down and end up stuck out at sea.

paulweller2
19 posts
14 May 2022 1:49PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
JohnnyTsunami said..
Send the board downwind and fall upwind with the wing. If you have to kick it upwind, don't kick it hard and try to fly downwind a bit with the wing.


I've been trying that. I have to learn to know what the just-right amount of kick is so that I don't end up encouraging the board to flip over. A lot easier to do when crashing mid-tack than mid-gybe.

airsail
QLD, 881 posts
14 May 2022 6:45PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
paulweller2 said..

airsail said..
Narrow board (22" wide) will help, less windage to flip the board. A heavier foil makes it sink quicker, but obviously not desired. I've had boards flip when riding larger wings but since moving to the 1040HA and narrow board I've never had a flip, even when on my 2.5mtr wing.



Thanks for the input. I might have to get a sinker board for windy days--the windy days here on Maui are consistent, albeit gusty, so it's unlikely that the wind will just die down and end up stuck out at sea.


My 22" wide board is not a sinker, 74lts. You can get away with narrow at the foil provides the lateral stability when getting up. I'm 80kgs and use this board in all conditions.

King Crash
NSW, 193 posts
14 May 2022 7:21PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
paulweller2 said..

airsail said..
Narrow board (22" wide) will help, less windage to flip the board. A heavier foil makes it sink quicker, but obviously not desired. I've had boards flip when riding larger wings but since moving to the 1040HA and narrow board I've never had a flip, even when on my 2.5mtr wing.



Thanks for the input. I might have to get a sinker board for windy days--the windy days here on Maui are consistent, albeit gusty, so it's unlikely that the wind will just die down and end up stuck out at sea.


This is a funny one. Something I've observed first hand, but some sinkers, If designed well. Paddle better, faster and are easier to than if you had to paddle a floating board.
My 4"0 PPC is a dream to paddle if I get stuck. It's easy, fast and really not that energy intensive. Whereas my 60L Starboard is a dredge to paddle - hard, slow and did I mention slow? Takes 40 minutes to swim what takes 15 on the PPC.
I would consider this as a worst case scenario, but always consider 'can I swim home from here'.

Beasho
209 posts
15 May 2022 2:30AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote

paulweller2 said..


Thanks for the excellent input! I did some testing over the last few days and ended up crashing whilst holding the wing, even with just one hand. This allowed me to surface knowing where the wind was so that I could figure out what my board was going to do. This obviously doesn't apply to every scenario but I felt like it gave me a little extra time to think.


Never let go of the wing during a wipe out. The worst combination is a board flipped and the wing fluttering at the end of its tether. Even on the beach the wing and foil will connect and pop (I have experienced both).

Now I NEVER let go of the wing on a crash. Sounds hard but just DON'T let go. This minimizes the chance of a contact. This also prevents the wrist leash from slipping off or breaking in a gust. It has happened to so many people and the only solution is to hang on to the wing.

I cringe whenever I look out and see someone's wing flapping at the end of their leash. Usually these are beginners.

MidAtlanticFoil
328 posts
15 May 2022 7:31AM
Thumbs Up

If you can get past the look of the Reel waist leash, that's they way to go. It will extend up to like 15' or something in a wave or high speed wipeout and then slowly real it back. I will grab the leash line after a bad wipeout to keep the board from retracting and away from the wing if needed. It's kinda unnerving at first out in the ocean when you eat it and you don't feel a hard yank from the board and you look around only to find it slowly meandering back to you.

Regarding the above advise about never letting go of the wing on a wipeout, I totally agree.except for two scenarios that I'm aware of. One is where you have a a wing tip drag and flip the wing. If you continue to hold the front strut handle and fall in, you can easily arm bar yourself and get a hyperextended elbow (just saw a YouTube video warning about this). The second scenario is when luffing the wing from the front handle at speed and breaching and going head first/ dive style by mistake. If you don't ditch the wing, you will jam your wrist easy.


I will often ditch the handle and gather the leash about a foot from the front handle very quickly whenever it doesn't make sense to maintain full connection to a handle. Never let it dance at the end of the leash.

Goofcat
157 posts
15 May 2022 3:04PM
Thumbs Up

Putting a foil through the wing is a rite of passage. Be proud of your accomplishment! Repairs are cheap. There are a couple of very skilled ladies on Maui who'll sew that thing back up brand new looking for less than $30. Don't be ghetto and cover the wing with tape.

I chuck my wing when I crash. Already have enough wrist and elbow issues from crashing on land, no need to jack myself up in the waves.

paulweller2
19 posts
Monday , 16 May 2022 12:59PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
airsail said..

paulweller2 said..


airsail said..
Narrow board (22" wide) will help, less windage to flip the board. A heavier foil makes it sink quicker, but obviously not desired. I've had boards flip when riding larger wings but since moving to the 1040HA and narrow board I've never had a flip, even when on my 2.5mtr wing.




Thanks for the input. I might have to get a sinker board for windy days--the windy days here on Maui are consistent, albeit gusty, so it's unlikely that the wind will just die down and end up stuck out at sea.



My 22" wide board is not a sinker, 74lts. You can get away with narrow at the foil provides the lateral stability when getting up. I'm 80kgs and use this board in all conditions.


What brand is your brand? I'm interested in downsizing to the Armstrong FG 75L or PPC Soar 68L--both boards are a few inches wider than 22". I'm 82kg.

paulweller2
19 posts
Monday , 16 May 2022 1:01PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
King Crash said..

paulweller2 said..


airsail said..
Narrow board (22" wide) will help, less windage to flip the board. A heavier foil makes it sink quicker, but obviously not desired. I've had boards flip when riding larger wings but since moving to the 1040HA and narrow board I've never had a flip, even when on my 2.5mtr wing.




Thanks for the input. I might have to get a sinker board for windy days--the windy days here on Maui are consistent, albeit gusty, so it's unlikely that the wind will just die down and end up stuck out at sea.



This is a funny one. Something I've observed first hand, but some sinkers, If designed well. Paddle better, faster and are easier to than if you had to paddle a floating board.
My 4"0 PPC is a dream to paddle if I get stuck. It's easy, fast and really not that energy intensive. Whereas my 60L Starboard is a dredge to paddle - hard, slow and did I mention slow? Takes 40 minutes to swim what takes 15 on the PPC.
I would consider this as a worst case scenario, but always consider 'can I swim home from here'.


My 95L Naish is by no means a joy to paddle--I think the width doesn't help. Great feedback. Thank you.

paulweller2
19 posts
Monday , 16 May 2022 1:08PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Beasho said..



paulweller2 said..



Thanks for the excellent input! I did some testing over the last few days and ended up crashing whilst holding the wing, even with just one hand. This allowed me to surface knowing where the wind was so that I could figure out what my board was going to do. This obviously doesn't apply to every scenario but I felt like it gave me a little extra time to think.



Never let go of the wing during a wipe out. The worst combination is a board flipped and the wing fluttering at the end of its tether. Even on the beach the wing and foil will connect and pop (I have experienced both).

Now I NEVER let go of the wing on a crash. Sounds hard but just DON'T let go. This minimizes the chance of a contact. This also prevents the wrist leash from slipping off or breaking in a gust. It has happened to so many people and the only solution is to hang on to the wing.

I cringe whenever I look out and see someone's wing flapping at the end of their leash. Usually these are beginners.


I appreciate the feedback. I think MidAtlanticFoil might be right about there being a few exceptions to this--as with almost everything--but this is something that I think beginners should know. I still consider myself very much a beginner but do cringe when I see wings flapping about upon entry/exit.

paulweller2
19 posts
Monday , 16 May 2022 1:16PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
MidAtlanticFoil said..
If you can get past the look of the Reel waist leash, that's they way to go. It will extend up to like 15' or something in a wave or high speed wipeout and then slowly real it back. I will grab the leash line after a bad wipeout to keep the board from retracting and away from the wing if needed. It's kinda unnerving at first out in the ocean when you eat it and you don't feel a hard yank from the board and you look around only to find it slowly meandering back to you.

Regarding the above advise about never letting go of the wing on a wipeout, I totally agree.except for two scenarios that I'm aware of. One is where you have a a wing tip drag and flip the wing. If you continue to hold the front strut handle and fall in, you can easily arm bar yourself and get a hyperextended elbow (just saw a YouTube video warning about this). The second scenario is when luffing the wing from the front handle at speed and breaching and going head first/ dive style by mistake. If you don't ditch the wing, you will jam your wrist easy.


I will often ditch the handle and gather the leash about a foot from the front handle very quickly whenever it doesn't make sense to maintain full connection to a handle. Never let it dance at the end of the leash.


Very helpful--thank you. I've seen a few of your videos with the reel affixed to your waist leash. I believe Robert Stehlik from BluePlanetHawaii also uses one of those. I will try to grab from the leash as noted--worth a try!

paulweller2
19 posts
Monday , 16 May 2022 1:21PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Goofcat said..
Putting a foil through the wing is a rite of passage. Be proud of your accomplishment! Repairs are cheap. There are a couple of very skilled ladies on Maui who'll sew that thing back up brand new looking for less than $30. Don't be ghetto and cover the wing with tape.

I chuck my wing when I crash. Already have enough wrist and elbow issues from crashing on land, no need to jack myself up in the waves.


I suppose you're right. I had a recent visit to Karen--exceptional care. The first tear was cross-shaped so the repair ripstop overlay is very much in the shape of a cross--christened my wing! An added bonus is that she stocks Armstrong-colored ripstop. Not sure about whether she stocks for other brands.

GWatto
QLD, 344 posts
Tuesday , 17 May 2022 3:25PM
Thumbs Up

Hey Paul, welcome to the forum, on a side note I've been a fan of your music for years

paulweller2
19 posts
Tuesday , 17 May 2022 2:04PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
GWatto said..
Hey Paul, welcome to the forum, on a side note I've been a fan of your music for years


I mean, this thing called wing foiling, you 'avin that? I got right into it. Music and now this. I'm the changingman!

Windoc
200 posts
Wednesday , 17 May 2022 11:09PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
MidAtlanticFoil said..
If you can get past the look of the Reel waist leash, that's they way to go. It will extend up to like 15' or something in a wave or high speed wipeout and then slowly real it back. I will grab the leash line after a bad wipeout to keep the board from retracting and away from the wing if needed...




I use a reel leash and for the most part it's actually great (minus the dork factor). But yesterday I took 3 crashes where I held onto the wing and the board ended upside down, downwind of me...while the reel tried to bring the board back to me. I managed to swim cross-wind each time and narrowly avoided shredding the wing. 35 knots, swell, well overpowered and tough to keep the soft things away from the stabby things. Normally this isn't an issue for me but I was using a wider board that may have been catching the wind on the rail easier to flip over.

airsail
QLD, 881 posts
Wednesday , 18 May 2022 1:12AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
paulweller2 said..

airsail said..


paulweller2 said..



airsail said..
Narrow board (22" wide) will help, less windage to flip the board. A heavier foil makes it sink quicker, but obviously not desired. I've had boards flip when riding larger wings but since moving to the 1040HA and narrow board I've never had a flip, even when on my 2.5mtr wing.





Thanks for the input. I might have to get a sinker board for windy days--the windy days here on Maui are consistent, albeit gusty, so it's unlikely that the wind will just die down and end up stuck out at sea.




My 22" wide board is not a sinker, 74lts. You can get away with narrow at the foil provides the lateral stability when getting up. I'm 80kgs and use this board in all conditions.



What brand is your brand? I'm interested in downsizing to the Armstrong FG 75L or PPC Soar 68L--both boards are a few inches wider than 22". I'm 82kg.


Carbonco, they are our local board builder in North Brisbane. Mitch the owner builds what we like and is an experienced winger himself. Narrow boards are a favourite, but with enough volume to get you back in the lightest wind and light weight to keep the swing weight down. Bit like riding a sinker without the associated problems.



Subscribe
Reply

Forums > Wing Foiling General


"Board gets flipped and the foil comes hurtling down..." started by paulweller