Forums > General Discussion   Shooting the breeze...

Healthy lifestyle choices

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Created by GreenPat Monday, 12 Aug 2019
eppo
WA, 7154 posts
Tuesday , 13 Aug 2019 10:41AM
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Meditation (sitting in stillness), regular fasting and a sensible diet with mainly natural foods is key I've found. Kind of forced on us with my son having ulcerative colitis. Your body still might drop dead and dissolve in the next second or so but hey at least you feel at peace when it all goes. Lol. It's not all that serious in the end nor hard. Just listen you your body. It's infinitely smarter than your little self in the head will ever be.

gavnwend
NSW, 1015 posts
Tuesday , 13 Aug 2019 1:07PM
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Just keep fit & eat your weeties in the morning.I once visited an organic food shop.walked in & noticed half the people looked sick & malnutritioned even the shop owner.

worrier
WA, 726 posts
Wednesday , 14 Aug 2019 5:43AM
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just come of a construction project in Sth Korea. 3 months over there. lost 4 kg with minimal effort, 20 mins in the gym in the morning and then Korean food. Very little bread, fats and sugar in their diet seems to be a simple formula that works.
W

rockmagnet
QLD, 1215 posts
Wednesday , 14 Aug 2019 8:05AM
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gavnwend said..
Just keep fit & eat your weeties in the morning.I once visited an organic food shop.walked in & noticed half the people looked sick & malnutritioned even the shop owner.



Funny how negative posts on healthy lifestyle generate a lot of green thumbs. It looks to me that it's easier for you to justify unhealthy lifestyles
than make the changes which are scientifically proven to not only extend your lifespan but will also increase the likelyhood of that extended lifespan being a healthy one.
By the way, I often go into organic food shops and have never noticed sick looking people in these shops but just normal looking people. I think you're just making it up to justify your own lack of commitment to healthy living.

amirite
238 posts
Wednesday , 14 Aug 2019 7:42AM
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rockmagnet said..
I think you're just making it up to justify your own lack of commitment to healthy living.

just make stuff up
call it news

landyacht
WA, 5796 posts
Wednesday , 14 Aug 2019 8:00AM
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interesting to see that the seabreezers are maturing and starting to think about to keep doing what they are doing.
a few years ago i felt really crap and went to a doctor by choice. apparently I had a cholesterol problem that wes about to blow. with significant diet change and exercise I have it under control.
thing is Im not a fatty,well under 80kg. after a year of the new regime i jumped on a mountain bike with panniers and rode from kalgoorlie to Perth, just because i could. and felt great the whole way. Ive even managed to win a couple of Bicycle races. that was really ticking boxes for me..
these days Im always looking for nice healthy foods ,but it is so easy to slip with both the food and the exercise

shi thouse
WA, 816 posts
Wednesday , 14 Aug 2019 9:03AM
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Interesting to see nowadays that the "easy" solution to weight loss is not through eating right/less and moving more is to go and get the gastric sleeve. I was amazed at a discussion I had with a group of people the other day resulted in many of them admitting that one or more members of their family had gone down this pathway.

Fast and highly processed food is more accessible than ever nowadays and a majority still see this as the best option. Was reading that the highest paid CEO in Australia is Don Meij (from Dominos Pizza) earning himself a portly sum of $37M last year, I wonder if he consistently indulges in his cheap $10 pizzas??

evlPanda
NSW, 8750 posts
Wednesday , 14 Aug 2019 12:29PM
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decrepit said..
OK as well as diet and exercise, some researchers have discovered another factor, that the medical profession hasn't caught up with yet.
It's the germ responsible for gum disease. Apparently it can invade blood cells, and over time damage lots of important stuff.

The simple answer is to floss your teeth regularly to prevent build up of plaque.

www.newscientist.com/article/mg24332420-900-have-we-found-the-true-cause-of-diabetes-stroke-and-alzheimers/
I'm subscribed to this, so in case you can't see all of it, I'll try and post the relevant bits.


In disease after disease, we are finding that bacteria are covertly involved, invading organs, co-opting our immune systems to boost their own survival and slowly making bits of us break down. The implication is that we may eventually be able to defeat heart attacks or Alzheimer's just by stopping these microbes.




Until now, bacteria's involvement completely eluded us. That's because they tend to work very slowly, stay dormant for long periods or hide inside cells. That makes them difficult to grow in culture, once the gold standard for linking bacteria to disease. But now DNA sequencing has revealed bacteria in places they were never supposed to be, manipulating inflammation in just the ways observed in these diseases. The findings are so contrary to received wisdom and emerging in so many diseases, each with its own separate research community, that awareness of all this is only starting to hit the mainstream (See "Germ theory"). And predictably, as with any paradigm shift, there is resistance.





The worst culprits, which seem to play a role in the widest range of ailments, are the bacteria that cause gum disease. This is the most widespread disease of ageing - in fact, "the most prevalent disease of mankind", says Maurizio Tonetti at the University of Hong Kong. In the US, 42 per cent of those aged 30 or above have gum disease, but that rises to 60 per cent in those 65 and older. It has been measured at 88 per cent in Germany.




Circumstantial evidence is certainly damning. In the US, states that put federal Medicaid funds towards people's dental costs, including those related to preventing or treating gum disease, ultimately pay between 31 and 67 per cent less than states that don't, to help those people later with heart attacks, diabetes, strokes and cancer. Private insurance companies report similar patterns, says David Ojcius at the University of the Pacific in San Francisco.




When the plaque the bacteria on your teeth live in builds up enough to harden and spread under the gum, it triggers inflammation: immune cells flood in and destroy both microbes and our own infected cells (see Diagram). If this goes on too long, an oxygen-poor pocket develops between gum and tooth. A handful of bacteria take advantage of this and multiply. One of them, Porphyromonas gingivalis, is especially insidious, disrupting the stable bacterial community and prolonging inflammation.




P. gingivalis may have a hand in it. It actually perpetuates inflammation by producing molecules that block some inflammatory processes, but not all of them, says Caroline Genco of Tufts University in Massachusetts. The resulting weakened inflammation never quite destroys the bacteria, but keeps trying, killing your own cells in the process. The debris is a feast for P. gingivalis, which, unlike most bacteria, needs to eat protein. The destruction also liberates the iron that bacteria need and which the body therefore normally keeps locked up. "These bacteria manipulate their interaction with the host immune response to enhance their own survival," says George Hajishengallis at the University of Pennsylvania.




But P. gingivalis antibodies seem to be more a mark of its passing than protection. People with these antibodies are actually more likely to die in the next decade than those with none, and more likely to get rheumatoid arthritis or have a heart attack or stroke.




One explanation for why gum disease makes you more likely to get conditions like diabetes and Alzheimer's disease is that it adds to your general "inflammatory load". But P. gingivalis may act more directly too: the bacteria have been detected in inflamed tissue in the brain, aorta, heart, liver, spleen, kidneys, joints and pancreas in mice and, in many cases, humans.



The bacteria trigger the molecular changes in artery linings that are typical of atherosclerosis, says Genco. We have also found that P. gingivalis creates the lipoproteins thought to trigger atherosclerosis, causes it in pigs and affects arteries much like high fat diets. Lakshmyya Kesavalu at the University of Florida, who has cultured viable P. gingivalis from the atherosclerotic aortas of mice, calls the bacteria "causal".



That is super interesting, and might be super helpful to me.

I've psoriatic athritis, which is basically inflammation at random places. This year it is my elbow and left foot, previously it has been shoulders, heels, fingers, and on one rather nasty occasion the sack lining my heart and lungs (pleuracy + pericarditis). That was a few fun days in ER. : D

I actually do take great care to floss, and have done so for decades.

However, there is this one, mysterious tooth that is "kinda sore to the touch" a the gums. It feels infected but I've had it scanned multiple times with zero result. Mystery. Also, it doesn't bother me at all; super minor thing.

But now you've posted all of that, I wonder....

Will be following up. Thanks for the post!

FormulaNova
NSW, 9024 posts
Thursday , 15 Aug 2019 12:19PM
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shi thouse said..
Interesting to see nowadays that the "easy" solution to weight loss is not through eating right/less and moving more is to go and get the gastric sleeve. I was amazed at a discussion I had with a group of people the other day resulted in many of them admitting that one or more members of their family had gone down this pathway.

Fast and highly processed food is more accessible than ever nowadays and a majority still see this as the best option. Was reading that the highest paid CEO in Australia is Don Meij (from Dominos Pizza) earning himself a portly sum of $37M last year, I wonder if he consistently indulges in his cheap $10 pizzas??


My uncle and one of my cousins had this done. The cousin initially lost a lot of weight, and then put it on again, and then the uncle did the same.

I think it works initially and then people learn to eat badly more often!

I know I have lost a lot of weight using liteneasy, but it gets boring after a while and the weight creeps up back if you are not careful.

If anyone is serious about weight control, it needs a change to your whole attitude and not just a once off.

petermac33
WA, 5159 posts
Friday , 16 Aug 2019 2:43PM
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Stop drinking fruit juice even the 100 percent variety.

Drink water instead it actually tastes pretty good after a while.

Been a week since I got off the 100 percent apple / black current juice diluted with 50 percent water and I've lost one kg so far.

Starting this Saturday I'm going to try fasting for a day once a week on every Saturday.

A semi fast in that I'm going to cheat a bit by juicing one or two oranges and lemons and add two or three litres of water. Also will have a few cups of herbal tea with a bit of honey.

FormulaNova
NSW, 9024 posts
Saturday , 17 Aug 2019 7:33AM
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petermac33 said..
Stop drinking fruit juice even the 100 percent variety.

Drink water instead it actually tastes pretty good after a while.

Been a week since I got off the 100 percent apple / black current juice diluted with 50 percent water and I've lost one kg so far.

Starting this Saturday I'm going to try fasting for a day once a week on every Saturday.

A semi fast in that I'm going to cheat a bit by juicing one or two oranges and lemons and add two or three litres of water. Also will have a few cups of herbal tea with a bit of honey.


Peter, what is it that you are doing this fasting or diet for?

Are you obese? Do you have medical problems other than you injury from the accident?

Do you have high levels of cholesterol?

Are you trying to solve a problem that you don't have?

My personal opinion is that its good to try and be healthy, which doesn't neccesarily mean skinny, but also enjoy it. Its no use being a skinny person sitting inside and just enjoying the fact that you are skinny.

petermac33
WA, 5159 posts
Saturday , 17 Aug 2019 2:11PM
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As Japie mentioned previous in this thread what you do or do not put down your gob relates strongly with your health and energy.

As for cholesterol levels etc never had any checks on anything ever.

As I've said before on another thread I shudder when I see the trolleys at Coles and WW with ninety plus percent garbage in them - and to think they've paid for it! Shudder perhaps is the wrong word. Really is quite sad.

Perhaps teaching our kids more nutrition studies at school over this LBGQ stuff might help to change our eating habits.



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Forums > General Discussion   Shooting the breeze...


"Healthy lifestyle choices" started by GreenPat