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Foil Racing - Windfoil Gybe Technique

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Created by berowne > 9 months ago, 9 Jul 2020
Taavi
192 posts
2 Dec 2023 5:40AM
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berowne said..

Tavi, I noticed the small rigs also get flipped way back, but the light sails look so easy to bring forward and rotate... I was tempted to try small rigs until I thought about giving up on my cams... nah. Good to see your having fun out there.



Yes, small rigs are fun. People who are also wave riding have an advantage there - they already have a full quiver of small sails anyway. Otherwise it would be crazy to invest in these I assume.

It's not racing I know, but a jibe is a jibe : )

Paducah
2441 posts
2 Dec 2023 9:49AM
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aeroegnr said..

Bellerophon said..
Amado shows how to jibe

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Something I'm noticing in general between really good jibers and people like me (who only makes some) is that they are laying the sail down a lot more. Also look at these light wind jibes after 0:55 here where they are laying down the big 9.0s. Looks like Amado is on much smaller gear but still laying down the sail quite a bit. I've been trying to lay down the sail more and it feels good until I biff the flip or catch a rail.



Rewatching these and the impression I'm getting isn't so much they are laying the sail down but they are carving hard. A lot of these jibes have the mast still close to 90 degrees to the board. It's the board that's way over. They aren't real bent over on bended knees the way a fin laydown requires

Which makes sense since both of these videos were for lighter wind which typically allows and almost requires a tighter radius. Plus it's a lot of fun.

aeroegnr
1450 posts
2 Dec 2023 11:02AM
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Yeah they are carving really hard. The one that really caught my eye was Noah's last jibe at 2:50 in the video. The sail movement preceded the board carve. Same with Amado at 0:50 and 2:40.

My own jibes are way flatter than that, at least the ones I have on video as I've been lazy about setting up the gopro.

I'm wondering if that's because I'm not sheeting in very hard and letting the sail pull me over on the foil, but subconsciously trying to keep the sail vertical??? That would explain as well why my jibe reaches a min speed around 10kts when probably I could do more like 15kts if I was doing a harder carve with better sheet in on the entry.

If I am fighting the motion of the sail pulling me over at the jibe entry like that then that would explain a whole lot. I'll have to go and see. I should probably do some S-turns with a really hard sheet and carve and see how that affects things.

Paducah
2441 posts
2 Dec 2023 12:36PM
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aeroegnr said..
Yeah they are carving really hard. The one that really caught my eye was Noah's last jibe at 2:50 in the video. The sail movement preceded the board carve. Same with Amado at 0:50 and 2:40.

My own jibes are way flatter than that, at least the ones I have on video as I've been lazy about setting up the gopro.

I'm wondering if that's because I'm not sheeting in very hard and letting the sail pull me over on the foil, but subconsciously trying to keep the sail vertical??? That would explain as well why my jibe reaches a min speed around 10kts when probably I could do more like 15kts if I was doing a harder carve with better sheet in on the entry.

If I am fighting the motion of the sail pulling me over at the jibe entry like that then that would explain a whole lot. I'll have to go and see. I should probably do some S-turns with a really hard sheet and carve and see how that affects things.


Yes, as he goes over the board to carve, his extended front hand is what allows the rig to go away from him as he begins the carve. If one keeps the front arm bent to keep the rig closer, that depowers the sail right at entry.

boardsurfr
WA, 2177 posts
3 Dec 2023 2:07AM
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Paducah said..
Yes, as he goes over the board to carve, his extended front hand is what allows the rig to go away from him as he begins the carve. If one keeps the front arm bent to keep the rig closer, that depowers the sail right at entry.


Bending the front arm may deposed some at the entry, but as soon as you go downwind, the opposite happens. With a straight front arm and the sail fully sheeted in, it depowers fully as you go downwind. That allows the body to get into a full forward, balanced stance. With a bent front arm, the sail can keep power when you go downwind, forcing the body to stay further back, which unsettles the board when you then flip the sail. Details, however, depend on board speed relative to wind speed. When windsurfing, board speed is usually less than wind speed, so the above is usually true. When foiling in lighter wind, there's a good chance that you are faster than the wind, and keeping the sail open by bending the front arm may actually get you backwinded when dead downwind. Keeping the sail parallel to the board with a straight front arm reduces backwinding problems, too.

Keeping the mast to the inside of the turn means that the weight of the rig will help to carve the board. It's an important thing when learning to foil jibe on a slow foil, doing sail-first jibes, since it keeps the turn going. Quite different setup to the race jibes above, but the same principle: using the rig weight to help the carve.

berowne
NSW, 1209 posts
8 Jan 2024 12:05PM
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It's fun when your PB gybes are mid-race!

Coal Point racing! F4 400 front wing,... 6m and 5m sails.











powersloshin
NSW, 1646 posts
10 Jan 2024 8:25AM
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Your alpha is faster than my 2sec. pb , and your front wing is as big as my stab !



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"Foil Racing - Windfoil Gybe Technique" started by berowne