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Sailing Expressions

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Created by Bundeenabuoy Two weeks ago, 25 Nov 2019
Bundeenabuoy
NSW, 693 posts
25 Nov 2019 2:05PM
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I hope this if fun.

Call at last line?
What does it mean?

Please feel free to ad your own expressions and ad the answers later, if no one knows.

lydia
959 posts
25 Nov 2019 3:03PM
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Let s go with some more modern ones from the racing world.
NANA - not a navigators arsehole
Press - the only word the tactician knows (meaning go bow down to get more keel lift)

Bundeenabuoy
NSW, 693 posts
25 Nov 2019 7:02PM
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Bundeenabuoy said..
I hope this if fun.

Call at last line?
What does it mean?

Please feel free to ad your own expressions and ad the answers later, if no one knows.


The James Craig was seeking permission from Sydney Port Authority to head out to sea at 10am yesterday.
He was given permission to leave the dock and then was told to 'Call at Last Line'.

Craig66
NSW, 1788 posts
25 Nov 2019 7:19PM
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Select to expand quote
Bundeenabuoy said..

Bundeenabuoy said..
I hope this if fun.

Call at last line?
What does it mean?

Please feel free to ad your own expressions and ad the answers later, if no one knows.



The James Craig was seeking permission from Sydney Port Authority to head out to sea at 10am yesterday.
He was given permission to leave the dock and then was told to 'Call at Last Line'.


Its about drugs right????

Ramona
NSW, 5302 posts
26 Nov 2019 8:07AM
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Select to expand quote
Bundeenabuoy said..

Bundeenabuoy said..
I hope this if fun.

Call at last line?
What does it mean?

Please feel free to ad your own expressions and ad the answers later, if no one knows.



The James Craig was seeking permission from Sydney Port Authority to head out to sea at 10am yesterday.
He was given permission to leave the dock and then was told to 'Call at Last Line'.


Maybe call at the last line on the chart.



lydia
959 posts
26 Nov 2019 5:13AM
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Sorry to be mundane but I think you will find it is about the port charges.
Just like the confirmation pilot on onboard.

Guitz
VIC, 455 posts
26 Nov 2019 12:01PM
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Shiver me timbers.

troubadour
NSW, 149 posts
26 Nov 2019 5:26PM
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When the last mooring line is let go so the vessel is now "underway" not anchored, moored or connected to a wharf or structure. First line is the opposite. When the vessel comes alongside and the first line is thrown to the shore crew or onto a bollard if the decky is up for it.
Both commercial vessel big ship terms.

Bundeenabuoy
NSW, 693 posts
29 Nov 2019 11:07PM
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What are 'quartering seas'

Toph
WA, 1477 posts
29 Nov 2019 10:23PM
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Right or wrong, I refer to a quartering sea a a sea state that is off the bow or stern quarter ie; not from ahead, abeam or stern...

shaggybaxter
QLD, 1874 posts
30 Nov 2019 1:39AM
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I've always liked this one. Makes me think of WWII destroyers and frigates and corvettes for some bizarre reason.
Fo'c'sle.

or for something,with a pinch more difficulty.
Scuttlebutt.

Ramona
NSW, 5302 posts
30 Nov 2019 8:36AM
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Bundeenabuoy said..
What are 'quartering seas'


Quartering seas is that nasty wave off the stern quarter that picks up the stern and tends to want to slew the arse end about. Displacement boats suffer from this because they are traveling slower than the waves.

samsturdy
NSW, 1457 posts
30 Nov 2019 4:31PM
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'I was so taken aback '. A ship was Taken Aback when a wind change blew the sails of a square rigger back onto the mast.

NowandZen
WA, 351 posts
30 Nov 2019 4:13PM
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troubadour said..
When the last mooring line is let go so the vessel is now "underway" not anchored, moored or connected to a wharf or structure. First line is the opposite. When the vessel comes alongside and the first line is thrown to the shore crew or onto a bollard if the decky is up for it.
Both commercial vessel big ship terms.


Submariners don't say "Underway" though....
They say "Wayunder"

SandS
VIC, 5767 posts
30 Nov 2019 7:41PM
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Ready about .... Lee-ho

2Shakey
SA, 3 posts
30 Nov 2019 7:49PM
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In Port Adelaide today its "Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey"

AzureF305
NSW, 124 posts
30 Nov 2019 11:49PM
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2Shakey said..
In Port Adelaide today its "Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey"


In the days of old, cast iron cannon balls were stacked in a pyramid fashion and retained by a 'monkey' on the ground - a frame made of brass to stop the balls from dislodging and rolling away. When it was very cold the difference in contraction between the iron cannon balls and the brass monkey would cause the cannonballs to roll out of the frame hence, "freeze the balls off a brass monkey".

Bundeenabuoy
NSW, 693 posts
1 Dec 2019 7:44AM
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Guitz said..
Shiver me timbers.


It was encapsulated in pirate fiction.
A quote that referred to a boat (timber) being hit by a large wave or a canon ball which made the boat shake.

plev
QLD, 152 posts
1 Dec 2019 7:19AM
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Supposed etymology[edit]It is often stated that the phrase originated from the use of a brass tray, called a "monkey", to hold cannonballs on warships in the 16th to 18th centuries. Supposedly, in very cold temperatures the "monkey" would contract, causing the balls to fall off.[15] However, nearly all historians and etymologists consider this story to be a myth. This story has been discredited by the U.S. Department of the Navy,[16] etymologist Michael Quinion, and the Oxford English Dictionary (OED).[17]They give five main reasons:The OED does not record the term "monkey" or "brass monkey" being used in this way.The purported method of storage of cannonballs ("round shot") is simply false. The shot was not stored on deck continuously on the off-chance that the ship might go into battle. Indeed, decks were kept as clear as possible.Furthermore, such a method of storage would result in shot rolling around on deck and causing a hazard in high seas. The shot was stored on the gun or spar decks, in shot racks-longitudinal wooden planks with holes bored into them, known as shot garlands in the Royal Navy, into which round shot was inserted for ready use by the gun crew.Shot was not left exposed to the elements where it could rust. Such rust could lead to the ball not flying true or jamming in the barrel and exploding the gun. Indeed, gunners would attempt to remove as many imperfections as possible from the surfaces of balls.The physics does not stand up to scrutiny. The contraction of both balls and plate over the range of temperatures involved would not be particularly large. The effect claimed possibly could be reproduced under laboratory conditions with objects engineered to a high precision for this purpose, but it is unlikely it would ever have occurred in real life aboard a warship.The reference is most likely a humorous reference to emphasize how cold it is.

Bananabender
QLD, 822 posts
1 Dec 2019 7:46AM
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plev said..
Supposed etymology[edit]It is often stated that the phrase originated from the use of a brass tray, called a "monkey", to hold cannonballs on warships in the 16th to 18th centuries. Supposedly, in very cold temperatures the "monkey" would contract, causing the balls to fall off.[15] However, nearly all historians and etymologists consider this story to be a myth. This story has been discredited by the U.S. Department of the Navy,[16] etymologist Michael Quinion, and the Oxford English Dictionary (OED).[17]They give five main reasons:The OED does not record the term "monkey" or "brass monkey" being used in this way.The purported method of storage of cannonballs ("round shot") is simply false. The shot was not stored on deck continuously on the off-chance that the ship might go into battle. Indeed, decks were kept as clear as possible.Furthermore, such a method of storage would result in shot rolling around on deck and causing a hazard in high seas. The shot was stored on the gun or spar decks, in shot racks-longitudinal wooden planks with holes bored into them, known as shot garlands in the Royal Navy, into which round shot was inserted for ready use by the gun crew.Shot was not left exposed to the elements where it could rust. Such rust could lead to the ball not flying true or jamming in the barrel and exploding the gun. Indeed, gunners would attempt to remove as many imperfections as possible from the surfaces of balls.The physics does not stand up to scrutiny. The contraction of both balls and plate over the range of temperatures involved would not be particularly large. The effect claimed possibly could be reproduced under laboratory conditions with objects engineered to a high precision for this purpose, but it is unlikely it would ever have occurred in real life aboard a warship.The reference is most likely a humorous reference to emphasize how cold it is.


Phew, So I'm right in what I told my grandkids . The brass monkey sitting on my mantle piece will lose its balls if left outside in winter .

AzureF305
NSW, 124 posts
1 Dec 2019 5:34PM
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plev said..
Supposed etymology[edit]It is often stated that the phrase originated from the use of a brass tray, called a "monkey", to hold cannonballs on warships in the 16th to 18th centuries. Supposedly, in very cold temperatures the "monkey" would contract, causing the balls to fall off.[15] However, nearly all historians and etymologists consider this story to be a myth. This story has been discredited by the U.S. Department of the Navy,[16] etymologist Michael Quinion, and the Oxford English Dictionary (OED).[17]They give five main reasons:The OED does not record the term "monkey" or "brass monkey" being used in this way.The purported method of storage of cannonballs ("round shot") is simply false. The shot was not stored on deck continuously on the off-chance that the ship might go into battle. Indeed, decks were kept as clear as possible.Furthermore, such a method of storage would result in shot rolling around on deck and causing a hazard in high seas. The shot was stored on the gun or spar decks, in shot racks-longitudinal wooden planks with holes bored into them, known as shot garlands in the Royal Navy, into which round shot was inserted for ready use by the gun crew.Shot was not left exposed to the elements where it could rust. Such rust could lead to the ball not flying true or jamming in the barrel and exploding the gun. Indeed, gunners would attempt to remove as many imperfections as possible from the surfaces of balls.The physics does not stand up to scrutiny. The contraction of both balls and plate over the range of temperatures involved would not be particularly large. The effect claimed possibly could be reproduced under laboratory conditions with objects engineered to a high precision for this purpose, but it is unlikely it would ever have occurred in real life aboard a warship.The reference is most likely a humorous reference to emphasize how cold it is.




... i never mentioned the word deck or ship, only the ground.
As for .The purported method of storage of cannonballs ("round shot") is simply false. , - well....


plev
QLD, 152 posts
1 Dec 2019 6:17PM
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Hmmm, stone armour plating on deck or a display for tourists. I'm out.

AzureF305
NSW, 124 posts
1 Dec 2019 7:25PM
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Lol!
Maybe just a big Ferro boat

cisco
QLD, 11387 posts
Tuesday , 3 Dec 2019 11:02AM
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Splice the main brace = Break out the rum.

Make and mends = The afternoon off.

Banyan = Beach picnic.

Limey = English sailor.



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"Sailing Expressions" started by Bundeenabuoy