Forums > Stand Up Paddle General

Shoulder impingement

Reply
Created by rgmacca Saturday, 11 Jan 2020
rgmacca
93 posts
Saturday , 11 Jan 2020 7:13AM
Thumbs Up

Any advice to help recovery from shoulder impingement. Had a few physio sessions but not made much difference. Must admit I have not rested much, only when it's been flat. is it rest that is required. thanks in advance .

Zeusman
NSW, 1275 posts
Saturday , 11 Jan 2020 11:26AM
Thumbs Up

rwtaaffe
NSW, 86 posts
Saturday , 11 Jan 2020 5:15PM
Thumbs Up

Good paddling technique and a good paddle!
I was suffering and found that these helped a lot.
I watched as many paddling technique video's as I could find and be aware of the load your placing on your shoulders.
Take off with lots of small/short strokes til your moving and then increase your stroke length for example. Going straight to long strokes puts high strain/load on your shoulders. Start in first gear, small short strokes, then change gears as you get moving.
I found a good paddle a great upgrade, they don't hold water/weight, they are lighter and have a better/softer flex IMO.
Adjustable paddles are ok for a beginner, but trade it in as soon as you can.
Adjustable paddles are stiffer, hold water in the shaft, which adds weight, which you have to swing.
You don't have to spend a fortune to get a better paddle, anyone who paddles regularly, will love a better/one piece paddle IMO

rockmagnet
QLD, 1288 posts
Saturday , 11 Jan 2020 5:51PM
Thumbs Up

Here's a simple stretch you can try.
With your back to kitchen table, step away from table, place palms on table and slowly lower yourself down and you will feel shoulder impingement slightly stretch . Don't over do it so that it hurts but do this whenever you can and hopefully fixes problem.
It cured my shoulder and several others I have shown. Learnt it from a retired physio at the gym a few years ago.

MLB007
24 posts
Saturday , 11 Jan 2020 5:07PM
Thumbs Up

Hanging cures a lot of shoulder ills. Just plain hanging.

grumpycat
QLD, 18 posts
Sunday , 12 Jan 2020 2:57PM
Thumbs Up

I'll second hanging, has really helped me, but ease into it. Quite a bit about it on YouTube

Bighugg
NT, 329 posts
Sunday , 12 Jan 2020 2:48PM
Thumbs Up

A bit left field, find a Sports Kinesiology practitioner . It releases the original muscle trauma memory from initial incidence allowing quicker recovery.
I'll third for hanging,
its great after long corrugated dirt road trips also.

rgmacca
93 posts
Monday , 13 Jan 2020 6:45AM
Thumbs Up

Will try the hanging and other exercise suggested. a climbing mate said he did a bit of hanging off finger board(big hold) and helped him, good to here support for the hanging.
I have a good single piece 100% small blade carbon paddle, I suppose vat 55 it catches up with you. thanks for advice guys.

Piros
QLD, 5683 posts
Monday , 13 Jan 2020 9:00AM
Thumbs Up

Best to look at a new paddle with a much softer shaft , smaller head size and shorten it by a couple of inches. Stop using the paddle you have got for now. Keep you elbow low in the stroke pointing towards the water not the horizon . This will help take heaps of load off the joint every stroke . That along with physio & stretching is the key.

GreenTea
32 posts
Monday , 13 Jan 2020 8:54AM
Thumbs Up

Look at the way you sleep. If you are waking up with pain in the shoulder change the way you are positioned. I've had chronic pain in my right shoulder for many years. I gave up prone surfing because of it and got into SUP which has helped. I found the position I was sleeping was contributing to my shoulder problem. Over some years I have trained myself to sleep in different positions. I don't limit the activities I do now I just manage the degree I do it. My shoulder is the best it has been for over 15 years.

The professionals never talk or look at position of sleep and I reckon it has a huge impact on shoulders.

CarterSUPhysio
QLD, 179 posts
Tuesday , 14 Jan 2020 2:07PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
rgmacca said..
Any advice to help recovery from shoulder impingement. Had a few physio sessions but not made much difference. Must admit I have not rested much, only when it's been flat. is it rest that is required. thanks in advance .


*had a few sessions with A physio - and haven't seen much difference. (pet peeve of mine when people say 'I tried physio and it didn't work) - no, you tried a single physio and they didn't work - physio is a profession. Just had to get that off my chest...This is a recent systematic review www.jospt.org/doi/abs/10.2519/jospt.2020.8498?mc_cid=d5afb6d1bb&mc_eid=f30f017a94 It made these 5 recommendations for sub-acromial shoulder pain (SSP) -Strong recommendation for exercise therapy to manage subacromial shoulder pain"There is strong evidence that exercise therapy should be the first line intervention for SSP to improve pain, ROM and function
There is evidence that exercise therapy is superior to non-exercise based interventions and that specific exercise is superior to general exercise"
Strong recommendation for exercise therapy + manual therapy


Weak recommendation for multimodal physiotherapy

"doing a 'shotgun treatment' where you do exercise, manual therapy, machines, rest, etc etc etc isn't as good as doing just one or two things really well.

Moderate recommendation for corticosteroid injection

"at 6 weeks, post injection you will be better after a cortisone injection than those who don't have one, at 12 weeks post injection, people who have a cortisone are WORSE or equal to those who didn't get one and at 6 months post injection, people who didn't have cortisone are doing better...www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27469590https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12535501
No evidence for laser, ultrasound, shockwave, and pulsed electromagnetic energy

So my questions would be1. did you modify to suit your symptoms ? Shorter sessions / distance etc (you can use FITT principle - frequency, intensity, time and type)2. did you get and or actually do any prescribed exercises from your physio - all the research suggests that to really improve your shoulder pain, strengthening is what is required, so if you don't get that from your physio - or you just don't do it then you won't get better...3. did you give these exercises enough time to change your tissue (~4weeks)?because i'm in a mood i'll address the advice above:
Select to expand quote
rwtaaffe said..
Good paddling technique and a good paddle!
I was suffering and found that these helped a lot.
I watched as many paddling technique video's as I could find and be aware of the load your placing on your shoulders.
Take off with lots of small/short strokes til your moving and then increase your stroke length for example. Going straight to long strokes puts high strain/load on your shoulders. Start in first gear, small short strokes, then change gears as you get moving.
I found a good paddle a great upgrade, they don't hold water/weight, they are lighter and have a better/softer flex IMO.
Adjustable paddles are ok for a beginner, but trade it in as soon as you can.
Adjustable paddles are stiffer, hold water in the shaft, which adds weight, which you have to swing.
You don't have to spend a fortune to get a better paddle, anyone who paddles regularly, will love a better/one piece paddle IMO


love this - changing your paddle is another way to make life easier on your shoulder. Essentially if you get a more flexible shaft or smaller blade you're asking less of your tissue tolerance of your shoulder. A stiffer shaft and bigger blade means your shoulders need to be stronger to cope with that change. As a temporary pain settling tool this is perfect advice.

Select to expand quote
rockmagnet said..
Here's a simple stretch you can try.
With your back to kitchen table, step away from table, place palms on table and slowly lower yourself down and you will feel shoulder impingement slightly stretch . Don't over do it so that it hurts but do this whenever you can and hopefully fixes problem.
It cured my shoulder and several others I have shown. Learnt it from a retired physio at the gym a few years ago.


This is likely to cause people with an irritated shoulder pain... perhaps you can try it (it's worth a go), but not something i'd suggest first up until the tissue has settled a bit first....
Select to expand quote
MLB007 said..
Hanging cures a lot of shoulder ills. Just plain hanging.


true... but not because of any fancy bull**** about being an animal and brachiation and stretching the shoulder joint... literally because if you hang, you'll probs get stronger and that's why it helps... But also, hanging position can be pain producing early on...
Select to expand quote
Bighugg said..
A bit left field, find a Sports Kinesiology practitioner . It releases the original muscle trauma memory from initial incidence allowing quicker recovery.
I'll third for hanging,
its great after long corrugated dirt road trips also.


glad it's helped this person out, but i'll refrain from my opinion on this as it will make me sound really unprofessional and sound like more of a dickhead than I probably already do... but embracing my mood let me spell it out like this in the context of brain surgery:"find a brain assessor practitioner. they will treat your tumor by changing your mind waves to shrink it..."
Select to expand quote
Piros said..
Best to look at a new paddle with a much softer shaft , smaller head size and shorten it by a couple of inches. Stop using the paddle you have got for now. Keep you elbow low in the stroke pointing towards the water not the horizon . This will help take heaps of load off the joint every stroke . That along with physio & stretching is the key.


legit can't flaw this... amazing
Select to expand quote
GreenTea said..
Look at the way you sleep. If you are waking up with pain in the shoulder change the way you are positioned. I've had chronic pain in my right shoulder for many years. I gave up prone surfing because of it and got into SUP which has helped. I found the position I was sleeping was contributing to my shoulder problem. Over some years I have trained myself to sleep in different positions. I don't limit the activities I do now I just manage the degree I do it. My shoulder is the best it has been for over 15 years.

The professionals never talk or look at position of sleep and I reckon it has a huge impact on shoulders.


defs good advice while you've got irritated tissues... i'm a professional and I talk about it.... but probs only as a factor if i've assessed that its actually causing a problem. I've slept the way I've slept for 30 years and haven't ever had one consistent problem. Correlation vs. Causation. Just because fire trucks will be at every fire, doesn't means fire trucks are the cause of the fire...Anyways, I do apologise - in a bad mood and this has helped me feel a little better., so thanks for that! - hope you get something out of this and wish you all the best with your shoulder.

yowiesup
NSW, 65 posts
Tuesday , 14 Jan 2020 6:58PM
Thumbs Up

The oracle has spoken.
No other experience or opinions will be tolerated

CarterSUPhysio
QLD, 179 posts
Tuesday , 14 Jan 2020 6:50PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
yowiesup said..
The oracle has spoken.
No other experience or opinions will be tolerated


I did leave myself wide open to a comment like this didn't I . I'm sure if you read back through, really, all I've done is just share my opinion too.... the beauty and curse of a forum. I've been called lots of things but "the oracle" is a new one!

rgmacca
93 posts
Wednesday , 15 Jan 2020 4:19AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
CarterSUPhysio said..

rgmacca said..
Any advice to help recovery from shoulder impingement. Had a few physio sessions but not made much difference. Must admit I have not rested much, only when it's been flat. is it rest that is required. thanks in advance .



*had a few sessions with A physio - and haven't seen much difference. (pet peeve of mine when people say 'I tried physio and it didn't work) - no, you tried a single physio and they didn't work - physio is a profession. Just had to get that off my chest...This is a recent systematic review www.jospt.org/doi/abs/10.2519/jospt.2020.8498?mc_cid=d5afb6d1bb&mc_eid=f30f017a94 It made these 5 recommendations for sub-acromial shoulder pain (SSP) -Strong recommendation for exercise therapy to manage subacromial shoulder pain"There is strong evidence that exercise therapy should be the first line intervention for SSP to improve pain, ROM and function
There is evidence that exercise therapy is superior to non-exercise based interventions and that specific exercise is superior to general exercise"
Strong recommendation for exercise therapy + manual therapy


Weak recommendation for multimodal physiotherapy

"doing a 'shotgun treatment' where you do exercise, manual therapy, machines, rest, etc etc etc isn't as good as doing just one or two things really well.

Moderate recommendation for corticosteroid injection

"at 6 weeks, post injection you will be better after a cortisone injection than those who don't have one, at 12 weeks post injection, people who have a cortisone are WORSE or equal to those who didn't get one and at 6 months post injection, people who didn't have cortisone are doing better...www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27469590https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12535501
No evidence for laser, ultrasound, shockwave, and pulsed electromagnetic energy

So my questions would be1. did you modify to suit your symptoms ? Shorter sessions / distance etc (you can use FITT principle - frequency, intensity, time and type)2. did you get and or actually do any prescribed exercises from your physio - all the research suggests that to really improve your shoulder pain, strengthening is what is required, so if you don't get that from your physio - or you just don't do it then you won't get better...3. did you give these exercises enough time to change your tissue (~4weeks)?because i'm in a mood i'll address the advice above:

rwtaaffe said..
Good paddling technique and a good paddle!
I was suffering and found that these helped a lot.
I watched as many paddling technique video's as I could find and be aware of the load your placing on your shoulders.
Take off with lots of small/short strokes til your moving and then increase your stroke length for example. Going straight to long strokes puts high strain/load on your shoulders. Start in first gear, small short strokes, then change gears as you get moving.
I found a good paddle a great upgrade, they don't hold water/weight, they are lighter and have a better/softer flex IMO.
Adjustable paddles are ok for a beginner, but trade it in as soon as you can.
Adjustable paddles are stiffer, hold water in the shaft, which adds weight, which you have to swing.
You don't have to spend a fortune to get a better paddle, anyone who paddles regularly, will love a better/one piece paddle IMO



love this - changing your paddle is another way to make life easier on your shoulder. Essentially if you get a more flexible shaft or smaller blade you're asking less of your tissue tolerance of your shoulder. A stiffer shaft and bigger blade means your shoulders need to be stronger to cope with that change. As a temporary pain settling tool this is perfect advice.


rockmagnet said..
Here's a simple stretch you can try.
With your back to kitchen table, step away from table, place palms on table and slowly lower yourself down and you will feel shoulder impingement slightly stretch . Don't over do it so that it hurts but do this whenever you can and hopefully fixes problem.
It cured my shoulder and several others I have shown. Learnt it from a retired physio at the gym a few years ago.



This is likely to cause people with an irritated shoulder pain... perhaps you can try it (it's worth a go), but not something i'd suggest first up until the tissue has settled a bit first....

MLB007 said..
Hanging cures a lot of shoulder ills. Just plain hanging.



true... but not because of any fancy bull**** about being an animal and brachiation and stretching the shoulder joint... literally because if you hang, you'll probs get stronger and that's why it helps... But also, hanging position can be pain producing early on...

Bighugg said..
A bit left field, find a Sports Kinesiology practitioner . It releases the original muscle trauma memory from initial incidence allowing quicker recovery.
I'll third for hanging,
its great after long corrugated dirt road trips also.



glad it's helped this person out, but i'll refrain from my opinion on this as it will make me sound really unprofessional and sound like more of a dickhead than I probably already do... but embracing my mood let me spell it out like this in the context of brain surgery:"find a brain assessor practitioner. they will treat your tumor by changing your mind waves to shrink it..."

Piros said..
Best to look at a new paddle with a much softer shaft , smaller head size and shorten it by a couple of inches. Stop using the paddle you have got for now. Keep you elbow low in the stroke pointing towards the water not the horizon . This will help take heaps of load off the joint every stroke . That along with physio & stretching is the key.



legit can't flaw this... amazing

GreenTea said..
Look at the way you sleep. If you are waking up with pain in the shoulder change the way you are positioned. I've had chronic pain in my right shoulder for many years. I gave up prone surfing because of it and got into SUP which has helped. I found the position I was sleeping was contributing to my shoulder problem. Over some years I have trained myself to sleep in different positions. I don't limit the activities I do now I just manage the degree I do it. My shoulder is the best it has been for over 15 years.

The professionals never talk or look at position of sleep and I reckon it has a huge impact on shoulders.



defs good advice while you've got irritated tissues... i'm a professional and I talk about it.... but probs only as a factor if i've assessed that its actually causing a problem. I've slept the way I've slept for 30 years and haven't ever had one consistent problem. Correlation vs. Causation. Just because fire trucks will be at every fire, doesn't means fire trucks are the cause of the fire...Anyways, I do apologise - in a bad mood and this has helped me feel a little better., so thanks for that! - hope you get something out of this and wish you all the best with your shoulder.


Thanks for input, will check out the review. Glad you had a vent.1, not really just tried to listen to my body and rest accordingly. 2, 4 sessions working in group class using resistant bands, prob 30 mins of varied exercises. 3, 4 wks worth twice a week, then tailed off.

In a nutshell I need to do continued exercise on shoulder to strengthen joint.
paddle is a shorten wave style with small head, not sure on flex.
Another question you might be able to give advice on (oracle lol) , I have an ingunial l hernia, can I do any more damage continuing to SUP surf? Cheers .

CarterSUPhysio
QLD, 179 posts
Wednesday , 15 Jan 2020 7:31AM
Thumbs Up

yeah sounds like a start, but not individualized and under dosed which is pretty classic physio. Keep working on that strength for sure. Hernia's are tricky. The simple answer is yes - you can do more damage. If a hernia becomes incarcerated (amazing word), essentially stuck inside the tear, then it can cause some serious issues to whatever is stuck, which is usually a piece of bowel. I do know blokes that are getting about SUP surfing with hernias - but my advice would be to escalate that one by heading to your GP and asking those questions. Good luck

micksmith
VIC, 1339 posts
Wednesday , 15 Jan 2020 5:54PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
rgmacca said..

CarterSUPhysio said..


rgmacca said..
Any advice to help recovery from shoulder impingement. Had a few physio sessions but not made much difference. Must admit I have not rested much, only when it's been flat. is it rest that is required. thanks in advance .




*had a few sessions with A physio - and haven't seen much difference. (pet peeve of mine when people say 'I tried physio and it didn't work) - no, you tried a single physio and they didn't work - physio is a profession. Just had to get that off my chest...This is a recent systematic review www.jospt.org/doi/abs/10.2519/jospt.2020.8498?mc_cid=d5afb6d1bb&mc_eid=f30f017a94 It made these 5 recommendations for sub-acromial shoulder pain (SSP) -Strong recommendation for exercise therapy to manage subacromial shoulder pain"There is strong evidence that exercise therapy should be the first line intervention for SSP to improve pain, ROM and function
There is evidence that exercise therapy is superior to non-exercise based interventions and that specific exercise is superior to general exercise"
Strong recommendation for exercise therapy + manual therapy


Weak recommendation for multimodal physiotherapy

"doing a 'shotgun treatment' where you do exercise, manual therapy, machines, rest, etc etc etc isn't as good as doing just one or two things really well.

Moderate recommendation for corticosteroid injection

"at 6 weeks, post injection you will be better after a cortisone injection than those who don't have one, at 12 weeks post injection, people who have a cortisone are WORSE or equal to those who didn't get one and at 6 months post injection, people who didn't have cortisone are doing better...www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27469590https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12535501
No evidence for laser, ultrasound, shockwave, and pulsed electromagnetic energy

So my questions would be1. did you modify to suit your symptoms ? Shorter sessions / distance etc (you can use FITT principle - frequency, intensity, time and type)2. did you get and or actually do any prescribed exercises from your physio - all the research suggests that to really improve your shoulder pain, strengthening is what is required, so if you don't get that from your physio - or you just don't do it then you won't get better...3. did you give these exercises enough time to change your tissue (~4weeks)?because i'm in a mood i'll address the advice above:


rwtaaffe said..
Good paddling technique and a good paddle!
I was suffering and found that these helped a lot.
I watched as many paddling technique video's as I could find and be aware of the load your placing on your shoulders.
Take off with lots of small/short strokes til your moving and then increase your stroke length for example. Going straight to long strokes puts high strain/load on your shoulders. Start in first gear, small short strokes, then change gears as you get moving.
I found a good paddle a great upgrade, they don't hold water/weight, they are lighter and have a better/softer flex IMO.
Adjustable paddles are ok for a beginner, but trade it in as soon as you can.
Adjustable paddles are stiffer, hold water in the shaft, which adds weight, which you have to swing.
You don't have to spend a fortune to get a better paddle, anyone who paddles regularly, will love a better/one piece paddle IMO




love this - changing your paddle is another way to make life easier on your shoulder. Essentially if you get a more flexible shaft or smaller blade you're asking less of your tissue tolerance of your shoulder. A stiffer shaft and bigger blade means your shoulders need to be stronger to cope with that change. As a temporary pain settling tool this is perfect advice.



rockmagnet said..
Here's a simple stretch you can try.
With your back to kitchen table, step away from table, place palms on table and slowly lower yourself down and you will feel shoulder impingement slightly stretch . Don't over do it so that it hurts but do this whenever you can and hopefully fixes problem.
It cured my shoulder and several others I have shown. Learnt it from a retired physio at the gym a few years ago.




This is likely to cause people with an irritated shoulder pain... perhaps you can try it (it's worth a go), but not something i'd suggest first up until the tissue has settled a bit first....


MLB007 said..
Hanging cures a lot of shoulder ills. Just plain hanging.




true... but not because of any fancy bull**** about being an animal and brachiation and stretching the shoulder joint... literally because if you hang, you'll probs get stronger and that's why it helps... But also, hanging position can be pain producing early on...


Bighugg said..
A bit left field, find a Sports Kinesiology practitioner . It releases the original muscle trauma memory from initial incidence allowing quicker recovery.
I'll third for hanging,
its great after long corrugated dirt road trips also.




glad it's helped this person out, but i'll refrain from my opinion on this as it will make me sound really unprofessional and sound like more of a dickhead than I probably already do... but embracing my mood let me spell it out like this in the context of brain surgery:"find a brain assessor practitioner. they will treat your tumor by changing your mind waves to shrink it..."


Piros said..
Best to look at a new paddle with a much softer shaft , smaller head size and shorten it by a couple of inches. Stop using the paddle you have got for now. Keep you elbow low in the stroke pointing towards the water not the horizon . This will help take heaps of load off the joint every stroke . That along with physio & stretching is the key.




legit can't flaw this... amazing


GreenTea said..
Look at the way you sleep. If you are waking up with pain in the shoulder change the way you are positioned. I've had chronic pain in my right shoulder for many years. I gave up prone surfing because of it and got into SUP which has helped. I found the position I was sleeping was contributing to my shoulder problem. Over some years I have trained myself to sleep in different positions. I don't limit the activities I do now I just manage the degree I do it. My shoulder is the best it has been for over 15 years.

The professionals never talk or look at position of sleep and I reckon it has a huge impact on shoulders.




defs good advice while you've got irritated tissues... i'm a professional and I talk about it.... but probs only as a factor if i've assessed that its actually causing a problem. I've slept the way I've slept for 30 years and haven't ever had one consistent problem. Correlation vs. Causation. Just because fire trucks will be at every fire, doesn't means fire trucks are the cause of the fire...Anyways, I do apologise - in a bad mood and this has helped me feel a little better., so thanks for that! - hope you get something out of this and wish you all the best with your shoulder.



Thanks for input, will check out the review. Glad you had a vent.1, not really just tried to listen to my body and rest accordingly. 2, 4 sessions working in group class using resistant bands, prob 30 mins of varied exercises. 3, 4 wks worth twice a week, then tailed off.

In a nutshell I need to do continued exercise on shoulder to strengthen joint.
paddle is a shorten wave style with small head, not sure on flex.
Another question you might be able to give advice on (oracle lol) , I have an ingunial l hernia, can I do any more damage continuing to SUP surf? Cheers .


I had an inguinal and femoral hernias A couple of years back, get it dealt with mate, don't mess with this stuff and do as your doctor says in terms of rest. Oh and by the way there is more long term success with open surgery compared to keyhole but your choice of course.

rgmacca
93 posts
Thursday , 16 Jan 2020 4:47AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
micksmith said..

rgmacca said..


CarterSUPhysio said..



rgmacca said..
Any advice to help recovery from shoulder impingement. Had a few physio sessions but not made much difference. Must admit I have not rested much, only when it's been flat. is it rest that is required. thanks in advance .





*had a few sessions with A physio - and haven't seen much difference. (pet peeve of mine when people say 'I tried physio and it didn't work) - no, you tried a single physio and they didn't work - physio is a profession. Just had to get that off my chest...This is a recent systematic review www.jospt.org/doi/abs/10.2519/jospt.2020.8498?mc_cid=d5afb6d1bb&mc_eid=f30f017a94 It made these 5 recommendations for sub-acromial shoulder pain (SSP) -Strong recommendation for exercise therapy to manage subacromial shoulder pain"There is strong evidence that exercise therapy should be the first line intervention for SSP to improve pain, ROM and function
There is evidence that exercise therapy is superior to non-exercise based interventions and that specific exercise is superior to general exercise"
Strong recommendation for exercise therapy + manual therapy


Weak recommendation for multimodal physiotherapy

"doing a 'shotgun treatment' where you do exercise, manual therapy, machines, rest, etc etc etc isn't as good as doing just one or two things really well.

Moderate recommendation for corticosteroid injection

"at 6 weeks, post injection you will be better after a cortisone injection than those who don't have one, at 12 weeks post injection, people who have a cortisone are WORSE or equal to those who didn't get one and at 6 months post injection, people who didn't have cortisone are doing better...www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27469590https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12535501
No evidence for laser, ultrasound, shockwave, and pulsed electromagnetic energy

So my questions would be1. did you modify to suit your symptoms ? Shorter sessions / distance etc (you can use FITT principle - frequency, intensity, time and type)2. did you get and or actually do any prescribed exercises from your physio - all the research suggests that to really improve your shoulder pain, strengthening is what is required, so if you don't get that from your physio - or you just don't do it then you won't get better...3. did you give these exercises enough time to change your tissue (~4weeks)?because i'm in a mood i'll address the advice above:



rwtaaffe said..
Good paddling technique and a good paddle!
I was suffering and found that these helped a lot.
I watched as many paddling technique video's as I could find and be aware of the load your placing on your shoulders.
Take off with lots of small/short strokes til your moving and then increase your stroke length for example. Going straight to long strokes puts high strain/load on your shoulders. Start in first gear, small short strokes, then change gears as you get moving.
I found a good paddle a great upgrade, they don't hold water/weight, they are lighter and have a better/softer flex IMO.
Adjustable paddles are ok for a beginner, but trade it in as soon as you can.
Adjustable paddles are stiffer, hold water in the shaft, which adds weight, which you have to swing.
You don't have to spend a fortune to get a better paddle, anyone who paddles regularly, will love a better/one piece paddle IMO





love this - changing your paddle is another way to make life easier on your shoulder. Essentially if you get a more flexible shaft or smaller blade you're asking less of your tissue tolerance of your shoulder. A stiffer shaft and bigger blade means your shoulders need to be stronger to cope with that change. As a temporary pain settling tool this is perfect advice.




rockmagnet said..
Here's a simple stretch you can try.
With your back to kitchen table, step away from table, place palms on table and slowly lower yourself down and you will feel shoulder impingement slightly stretch . Don't over do it so that it hurts but do this whenever you can and hopefully fixes problem.
It cured my shoulder and several others I have shown. Learnt it from a retired physio at the gym a few years ago.





This is likely to cause people with an irritated shoulder pain... perhaps you can try it (it's worth a go), but not something i'd suggest first up until the tissue has settled a bit first....



MLB007 said..
Hanging cures a lot of shoulder ills. Just plain hanging.





true... but not because of any fancy bull**** about being an animal and brachiation and stretching the shoulder joint... literally because if you hang, you'll probs get stronger and that's why it helps... But also, hanging position can be pain producing early on...



Bighugg said..
A bit left field, find a Sports Kinesiology practitioner . It releases the original muscle trauma memory from initial incidence allowing quicker recovery.
I'll third for hanging,
its great after long corrugated dirt road trips also.





glad it's helped this person out, but i'll refrain from my opinion on this as it will make me sound really unprofessional and sound like more of a dickhead than I probably already do... but embracing my mood let me spell it out like this in the context of brain surgery:"find a brain assessor practitioner. they will treat your tumor by changing your mind waves to shrink it..."



Piros said..
Best to look at a new paddle with a much softer shaft , smaller head size and shorten it by a couple of inches. Stop using the paddle you have got for now. Keep you elbow low in the stroke pointing towards the water not the horizon . This will help take heaps of load off the joint every stroke . That along with physio & stretching is the key.





legit can't flaw this... amazing



GreenTea said..
Look at the way you sleep. If you are waking up with pain in the shoulder change the way you are positioned. I've had chronic pain in my right shoulder for many years. I gave up prone surfing because of it and got into SUP which has helped. I found the position I was sleeping was contributing to my shoulder problem. Over some years I have trained myself to sleep in different positions. I don't limit the activities I do now I just manage the degree I do it. My shoulder is the best it has been for over 15 years.

The professionals never talk or look at position of sleep and I reckon it has a huge impact on shoulders.





defs good advice while you've got irritated tissues... i'm a professional and I talk about it.... but probs only as a factor if i've assessed that its actually causing a problem. I've slept the way I've slept for 30 years and haven't ever had one consistent problem. Correlation vs. Causation. Just because fire trucks will be at every fire, doesn't means fire trucks are the cause of the fire...Anyways, I do apologise - in a bad mood and this has helped me feel a little better., so thanks for that! - hope you get something out of this and wish you all the best with your shoulder.




Thanks for input, will check out the review. Glad you had a vent.1, not really just tried to listen to my body and rest accordingly. 2, 4 sessions working in group class using resistant bands, prob 30 mins of varied exercises. 3, 4 wks worth twice a week, then tailed off.

In a nutshell I need to do continued exercise on shoulder to strengthen joint.
paddle is a shorten wave style with small head, not sure on flex.
Another question you might be able to give advice on (oracle lol) , I have an ingunial l hernia, can I do any more damage continuing to SUP surf? Cheers .



I had an inguinal and femoral hernias A couple of years back, get it dealt with mate, don't mess with this stuff and do as your doctor says in terms of rest. Oh and by the way there is more long term success with open surgery compared to keyhole but your choice of course.


Thanks for info. Will do.
cheers,

Gboots
NSW, 738 posts
Thursday , 16 Jan 2020 9:46AM
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The inguinal hernia one is tricky.
I have been managing mine for over 29 years. Some doctors want to operate on all hernias whereas others take a wait and see approach.
I actively monitor my hernia by having an ultrasounds every 3 to 5 years . Mine has not changed since I started SUPing. Still 6mm gap but no bulge (no change) . Mine is an indirect inguinal .
Things I do to minimise worsening are:
a. Avoid heavy lifting and when I do try not to squeeze ...you know what I mean
b. Keep weight down, don't overeat and make sure you have a diet that keeps you regular .
c. When I feel minor pain or sensations then I rest

There are also some exercises that you can find on YouTube that help
At an individual choice . I am trying to minimise surgeries. However if it gets worse then I will have no choice.
Hoping also that surgical techniques improve to minimise post surgical risks.
Note this is my personal choice and not necessarily the best one.

So you need to make the decision that's right for you. All the best with it



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"Shoulder impingement" started by rgmacca