Forums > Windsurfing General

Ideal duration of a windsurfing holiday

Reply
Created by Faff > 9 months ago, 22 May 2014
Faff
VIC, 620 posts
22 May 2014 9:54AM
Thumbs Up

Provided you can sail everyday, what is the ideal duration of a windsurfing holiday?

Before everyone chimes in "as long as possible!"

Last year I spent 23 days in Vassiliki as a beginner and was completely stuffed after 2 weeks. I had to give it a rest for 2 Saturdays, otherwise I would have dropped dead. And I was reasonably fit when I came there (swimming 1 km per day, gym almost everyday 6 months prior). OK, for the first 2 weeks I was out on the water almost all day (light wind in the morning on a high volume board, crazy gusty wind in the afternoon). I dropped the morning sessions in the final week. Vass was very gusty (thermal wind). My only accomplishment was waterstarts.

This year I will go to the Cocos Islands. The only question is the trip duration. I can waterstart, plane briefly (but only with the front foot in the strap), use the harness a bit. Still in the catapult stage, though mercifully the mast now usually misses the nose of my board. My options are 2, 3 and 4 weeks. I want to make as much progress as possible without killing myself (especially forearms and hands). It seems like the wind is somewhat weaker there, but more consistent. I also weigh less this year. 67 kg down from 76 kg, so planing is only limited by skill. It's flat and shallow way out, so waterstarting should be easier. The water is warmer. On the downside, I'm a year older (37).

What do you guys reckon? The basic expectation is to plane reliably in the straps and harness. The dream is carve gybes.

FormulaNova
NSW, 7871 posts
22 May 2014 10:51AM
Thumbs Up

Can you go for 4 weeks and commit to taking a few days off at a time so that you are only 'sailing' for 2 weeks? At your stage it might be the best idea because its a great time to learn but one block of 4 weeks might be a bit too much. I think when you get tired you start making mistakes and stuffing simple things up.

After re-reading your question, maybe its a bit early to expect to handle 4 weeks in one go. There is the potential to learn a lot, but at your stage it might be a bit too tiring. You won't know until you are there. You might find you use up all the time and are loving it, or that you are shattered after 2 weeks.



Mobydisc
NSW, 8375 posts
22 May 2014 11:47AM
Thumbs Up

The big issue is how often you fall in and how difficult it is to get going again, for me anyway. I can sail for quite a few hours if I'm not falling in much. However if falling in all the time, I get worn out and tired fairly quickly. Also the water state is a big factor too. If the water is really choppy then it takes it out of me a lot quicker than flat water.

So if the water at the CoCos Islands is flat and it has a sandy bottom that you can stand on, I would aim to stay there as long as possible. These sorts of areas make windsurfing as easy as it can be so you make good progress or have a lot of fun.

Faff
VIC, 620 posts
22 May 2014 12:15PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Mobydisc said...
The big issue is how often you fall in and how difficult it is to get going again, for me anyway. I can sail for quite a few hours if I'm not falling in much. However if falling in all the time, I get worn out and tired fairly quickly. Also the water state is a big factor too. If the water is really choppy then it takes it out of me a lot quicker than flat water.

So if the water at the CoCos Islands is flat and it has a sandy bottom that you can stand on, I would aim to stay there as long as possible. These sorts of areas make windsurfing as easy as it can be so you make good progress or have a lot of fun.




Vass in the afternoon for me was all about trying to waterstart and hanging on for dear life to get back to shore. In the last 2 days the waterstarts "clicked", and I had zero uphauls (those things were absolute murder). It also helped that the wind was a bit weaker and less gusty than usual (less than 20 knots?). I actually managed some very long planing runs with one foot in the straps. Physically those last 2 days were the easiest for me by far. But then I had fly back home

By all accounts Cocos is flattish, shallow with a moderately strong but consistent trade wind. Hmm... I think I'm convincing myself to do at least 3 weeks. My other consideration is that I'll be out of action from October to January - half the season in Melbourne.

P.S.
As hard as Vass was for me, Melbourne is far harder.

Stuthepirate
WA, 3404 posts
22 May 2014 10:59AM
Thumbs Up

30 +/- 5 years

Paul Kelf
WA, 677 posts
22 May 2014 11:04AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
MrCranky said...
[br] My options are 2, 3 and 4 weeks. I want to make as much progress as possible without killing myself (especially forearms and hands). It seems like the wind is somewhat weaker there, but more consistent. I also weigh less this year. 67 kg down from 76 kg, so planing is only limited by skill. It's flat and shallow way out, so waterstarting should be easier. The water is warmer. On the downside, I'm a year older (37).

What do you guys reckon? The basic expectation is to plane reliably in the straps and harness. The dream is carve gybes.


Mate, 4 weeks in Cocos & you will be doing all of the above

Jez or Paul will give you as much help as you want, just keep asking

You will get plenty of rest time between the tides but there's plenty of other stuff to do, watching the kiters get dragged around is pretty funny

I have always gone for 2 weeks & it's a real bummer when you have to leave, it goes too quick

sboardcrazy
NSW, 6434 posts
22 May 2014 1:04PM
Thumbs Up

If you can get lessons while your over there it will help.

Faff
VIC, 620 posts
22 May 2014 2:20PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Paul Kelf said...

Mate, 4 weeks in Cocos & you will be doing all of the above

Jez or Paul will give you as much help as you want, just keep asking

You will get plenty of rest time between the tides but there's plenty of other stuff to do, watching the kiters get dragged around is pretty funny

I have always gone for 2 weeks & it's a real bummer when you have to leave, it goes too quick


Well, you've sold me on 4 weeks then.

NotWal
QLD, 6743 posts
22 May 2014 4:37PM
Thumbs Up

What's the best time to go to Cocos?

seanhogan
2991 posts
22 May 2014 3:35PM
Thumbs Up

when they're ripe...

Ben 555
NSW, 429 posts
23 May 2014 9:42AM
Thumbs Up

The simple answer is as long as possible

The major issue is how your body and in particular your hands hold up to constant sailing.

For those in the west who sail consistently maybe not such a problem, but if like me your stuck at work/ family commitments and your usual sailing window is narrow you hands aren't conditioned to gripping a boom for 4-5 hrs per day

The head will always say one more run the hands say enough

Hooksey
WA, 493 posts
23 May 2014 7:55AM
Thumbs Up


Go 4 weeks and take 4 big packs of ibuprofen.

sboardcrazy
NSW, 6434 posts
23 May 2014 11:27AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Ben 555 said...
The simple answer is as long as possible

The major issue is how your body and in particular your hands hold up to constant sailing.

For those in the west who sail consistently maybe not such a problem, but if like me your stuck at work/ family commitments and your usual sailing window is narrow you hands aren't conditioned to gripping a boom for 4-5 hrs per day

The head will always say one more run the hands say enough


gloves..

FormulaNova
NSW, 7871 posts
23 May 2014 12:08PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
sboardcrazy said...
Ben 555 said...
The simple answer is as long as possible

The major issue is how your body and in particular your hands hold up to constant sailing.

For those in the west who sail consistently maybe not such a problem, but if like me your stuck at work/ family commitments and your usual sailing window is narrow you hands aren't conditioned to gripping a boom for 4-5 hrs per day

The head will always say one more run the hands say enough


gloves..



Gloves can be a problem if you haven't used them before. The slight increase in diameter can make your forearms hurt until you get used to them. The wrong gloves can cause blisters to build on the fingers more than they might without gloves, until you are used to them.

I wouldn't go to Cocos before using gloves, but they might help if you do get blisters and really want to sail despite the pain. Take superglue.

Does Cocos have any other problems? When I came back from 3 weeks in Fiji I had infections in my skin from something that took weeks or months to fix. I used tea tree oil on someone's suggestion which seemed to make it better.

Ahh, that reminds me. My best strategy for a long windsurf holiday in Fiji was to use the hammock when the wind was marginal and only get out of it when the wind is consistent. What I found was that everyone was worn out from fighting a gusty wind, you use less energy when its steady, and there are less people on the water getting in your way.

Its not good seeing an awesome day happening and wishing that you rested the day before when it was marginal.

Faff
VIC, 620 posts
23 May 2014 12:30PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
sboardcrazy said...
Ben 555 said...
The simple answer is as long as possible

The major issue is how your body and in particular your hands hold up to constant sailing.

For those in the west who sail consistently maybe not such a problem, but if like me your stuck at work/ family commitments and your usual sailing window is narrow you hands aren't conditioned to gripping a boom for 4-5 hrs per day

The head will always say one more run the hands say enough


gloves..



Have worn them since day one. Full finger length as well, since I've seen people get ugly bilsters on their fingers when wearing short-finger ones. No blisters at all ever. The problem is forearms and hand pain. My forearms are long and thin, that could be the problem. I actually woke up from the pain in Vass. Voltaren did nothing. Neither did Panadol.

I think that I also have an overly tight grip. Learning to use the harness is the key, IMO. OTOH, I got a lesson in Melbourne, and the instructor did not wear a harness. He said he hardly ever does, only if it's blowing like mad. But he is a Formula racer. Said that whenever you hook in, people fly past you.

sboardcrazy
NSW, 6434 posts
23 May 2014 12:37PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
MrCranky said...
sboardcrazy said...
Ben 555 said...
The simple answer is as long as possible

The major issue is how your body and in particular your hands hold up to constant sailing.

For those in the west who sail consistently maybe not such a problem, but if like me your stuck at work/ family commitments and your usual sailing window is narrow you hands aren't conditioned to gripping a boom for 4-5 hrs per day

The head will always say one more run the hands say enough


gloves..



Have worn them since day one. Full finger length as well, since I've seen people get ugly bilsters on their fingers when wearing short-finger ones. No blisters at all ever. The problem is forearms and hand pain. My forearms are long and thin, that could be the problem. I actually woke up from the pain in Vass. Voltaren did nothing. Neither did Panadol.

I think that I also have an overly tight grip. Learning to use the harness is the key, IMO. OTOH, I got a lesson in Melbourne, and the instructor did not wear a harness. He said he hardly ever does, only if it's blowing like mad. But he is a Formula racer. Said that whenever you hook in, people fly past you.

??? Funny idea as 99.9% of windsurfers do + the top riders..I'd get another instructor..
Yes learn to use the harness - when set up properly you should be able to just rest your fingers on the boom only gripping when unhooked for gybing or if you need to pull down into the boom for some reason..
I rely on the harness too much..hooking in even subplaning..but I'm a weakling..

Paul Kelf
WA, 677 posts
23 May 2014 10:42AM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
FormulaNova said...





Does Cocos have any other problems? When I came back from 3 weeks in Fiji I had infections in my skin from something that took weeks or months to fix. I used tea tree oil on someone's suggestion which seemed to make it better.




Tiny bits of coral get into your feet sometimes but seem to work their way out eventually.
Some people have had some spiny things in their feet as well but generally if you stick to the clear areas you won't have a problem.

Kiters are a pest though, mostly the locals

Faff
VIC, 620 posts
23 May 2014 12:45PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
Paul Kelf said...
FormulaNova said...





Does Cocos have any other problems? When I came back from 3 weeks in Fiji I had infections in my skin from something that took weeks or months to fix. I used tea tree oil on someone's suggestion which seemed to make it better.




Tiny bits of coral get into your feet sometimes but seem to work their way out eventually.
Some people have had some spiny things in their feet as well but generally if you stick to the clear areas you won't have a problem.

Kiters are a pest though, mostly the locals


Have always worn booties too. So 4 weeks, no excuses.

FormulaNova
NSW, 7871 posts
23 May 2014 1:00PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
MrCranky said...
sboardcrazy said...
Ben 555 said...
The simple answer is as long as possible

The major issue is how your body and in particular your hands hold up to constant sailing.

For those in the west who sail consistently maybe not such a problem, but if like me your stuck at work/ family commitments and your usual sailing window is narrow you hands aren't conditioned to gripping a boom for 4-5 hrs per day

The head will always say one more run the hands say enough


gloves..



Have worn them since day one. Full finger length as well, since I've seen people get ugly bilsters on their fingers when wearing short-finger ones. No blisters at all ever. The problem is forearms and hand pain. My forearms are long and thin, that could be the problem. I actually woke up from the pain in Vass. Voltaren did nothing. Neither did Panadol.

I think that I also have an overly tight grip. Learning to use the harness is the key, IMO. OTOH, I got a lesson in Melbourne, and the instructor did not wear a harness. He said he hardly ever does, only if it's blowing like mad. But he is a Formula racer. Said that whenever you hook in, people fly past you.


The forearms get much better when you learn to use the harness properly. Unfortunately by then you might do some damage and/or wear yourself out prematurely. No matter whether your forearms are long and thin or short and built like stumps, they will wear out if you don't use the harness properly.

A Formula racer that doesn't use a harness? Sure, maybe if you are in between doing something, but its crazy not to use the harness when you can. I don't know how he goes holding down anything other than a small sail when its windy enough to plane. I wouldn't take his advice if he hardly ever uses a harness.

He would be easy to spot on the water, he would look like Popeye. Hopefully at the front of the fleet, otherwise he should use his harness more.





Faff
VIC, 620 posts
23 May 2014 2:34PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
FormulaNova said...

The forearms get much better when you learn to use the harness properly. Unfortunately by then you might do some damage and/or wear yourself out prematurely. No matter whether your forearms are long and thin or short and built like stumps, they will wear out if you don't use the harness properly.

A Formula racer that doesn't use a harness? Sure, maybe if you are in between doing something, but its crazy not to use the harness when you can. I don't know how he goes holding down anything other than a small sail when its windy enough to plane. I wouldn't take his advice if he hardly ever uses a harness.

He would be easy to spot on the water, he would look like Popeye. Hopefully at the front of the fleet, otherwise he should use his harness more.


He gave me a planing lesson. It was sub-15 knots. He pumped like a gorilla and got going. I could not. Normal-size guy, not pop-eye by any means. Anyway, to me the sport is impossible without a harness.


FormulaNova
NSW, 7871 posts
23 May 2014 4:02PM
Thumbs Up

Select to expand quote
MrCranky said...
FormulaNova said...

The forearms get much better when you learn to use the harness properly. Unfortunately by then you might do some damage and/or wear yourself out prematurely. No matter whether your forearms are long and thin or short and built like stumps, they will wear out if you don't use the harness properly.

A Formula racer that doesn't use a harness? Sure, maybe if you are in between doing something, but its crazy not to use the harness when you can. I don't know how he goes holding down anything other than a small sail when its windy enough to plane. I wouldn't take his advice if he hardly ever uses a harness.

He would be easy to spot on the water, he would look like Popeye. Hopefully at the front of the fleet, otherwise he should use his harness more.


He gave me a planing lesson. It was sub-15 knots. He pumped like a gorilla and got going. I could not. Normal-size guy, not pop-eye by any means. Anyway, to me the sport is impossible without a harness.






Ahh, that's different. When its not enough wind to plane from a start, but enough to plane once going, you don't need to use the harness until you are planing steadily. You can pump onto the plane and then hook in once you are moving steadily. Sure, you could avoid the harness, but you really can't make the most of the wind unless you do.

Don't worry about the pumping bit. in my experience it is technique as much as strength, and like most people, pumping on one side is easier than the other.



Subscribe
Reply

Forums > Windsurfing General


"Ideal duration of a windsurfing holiday" started by Faff