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Forums > Windsurfing   Gps and Speed talk

Weed Fins for Lake George

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Created by Old Salty Two weeks ago, 15 Mar 2020
legless
WA, 833 posts
25 Mar 2020 2:10PM
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fangman said..
Apologies for the hijack to Old Salty. Regardless of the commercial issues, I would like to say a big kudos and thank you to Dietrich Hanke who was the designer behind the original Delta. That fin was the first fin that allowed me to safely sail the magic carpet. It opened up this whole new wonderful world of sailing fast on the thick weed on my doorstep, provided a massive smile on the dial for a lot of people and inspired a whole bunch of fin development from some very talented people. Big green thumbs up to Dietrich H from me, and besides, without that fin, I might have ended up kiting.


For really thick weed you can get in NSW the 55 degrees of the original delta designed by Dietrich is still the best way to get through it without risking a catapult. Many are happy to put up with the lack of grip for the confidence they can hit a big weed berg and get through it with out catapulting in very shallow water.

decrepit
WA, 9848 posts
25 Mar 2020 2:23PM
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legless said..
Not sure how a bent one is created from a flat G10 sheet. Maybe a shipment got heat damaged somehow.

I will need to let people try my Delta XT 50's out at peel inlet to see how good they can be.


Yep, heat damage is a possibility, I hadn't thought of that, we were puzzled how it happened.

It would be good to know that the previous problems are now, non existent. There's not much weed at Fangys at the moment but Point grey is shallow and flat. That's the place to demonstrate them. The big challenge is crossing the choppy channel. You don't want to spin out in the middle of the stink boat lane.

Pacey
WA, 178 posts
25 Mar 2020 2:25PM
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legless said..


Pacey said..
The problem with these is that they look to be hand-foiled by a gorilla with Parkinson's. Mine was so poorly shaped that on my first sail with it, I sailed about 300 m out from the beach at Liptons, spinning out constantly, turned around and sailed back, still spinning out. Took the fin off and never used it again, very disappointing. I appreciate there is a lot of variability with hand foiling, so your mileage may vary.





Strange I have not heard that before! Are you talking about the Delta XT or the Delta XT 50? Delta fins require you to adjust your sailing style to get the best out of them the guys that have mastered them can get away with sailing much smaller sizes which mean less resistance and contact with weed and more speed. Sailing 600m on it is not really giving it a chance it may also have been the wrong size for your set up that day. But as with everything in windsurfing what works for one person may not work for someone else.



Mine was a Delta XT 50 18, just like in the picture. The shaping was appalling, large flat spots on either side, twisted trailing edge, asymmetrical leading edge. It certainly wasn't shaped by anyone who had any concept of foil sections. But as I said, your mileage may vary, maybe mine was just shaped by someone with a bad hangover and blurred vision.

However I did feel like I had been robbed given the cost of it, was not impressed at all at throwing about $250 down the drain.

The fin has since been reshaped to put a decent foil on it but I haven't tried it yet, will let you know how it goes

legless
WA, 833 posts
25 Mar 2020 3:16PM
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decrepit said..

legless said..
Not sure how a bent one is created from a flat G10 sheet. Maybe a shipment got heat damaged somehow.

I will need to let people try my Delta XT 50's out at peel inlet to see how good they can be.



Yep, heat damage is a possibility, I hadn't thought of that, we were puzzled how it happened.

It would be good to know that the previous problems are now, non existent. There's not much weed at Fangys at the moment but Point grey is shallow and flat. That's the place to demonstrate them. The big challenge is crossing the choppy channel. You don't want to spin out in the middle of the stink boat lane.


The heat damage was all I can think of but It would have had to be a pretty high temperature.

I think there may have been more problems in the production of the original 55 degree Delta's because they had much longer FWD sections in front of the box not that I know anything about CNC machining a fin but I imagine that would be a harder section to CNC thus leading to possible errors.

The Delta XT 50 has a shorter FWD section particularly on the smaller sizes 14cm down do not have one. I personally have not seen a bent one.

Yes crossing the channel at point grey is an issue I think you just need to pick the right size fin for your setup and the conditions and try not to sail across the channel full powered and try and reduce the amount of pressure on you back foot . At Budgie in NSW sailing from Buff point to get to the flat you have to cross a smaller boat channel but when it is blowing the chop/swell can spike up it is fun watch people get back in using a delta. However the big advantage of the Delta XT 50 for point grey is you can sail with a smaller fin thus eliminate the chance of running aground.

legless
WA, 833 posts
25 Mar 2020 3:19PM
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Pacey said..

legless said..



Pacey said..
The problem with these is that they look to be hand-foiled by a gorilla with Parkinson's. Mine was so poorly shaped that on my first sail with it, I sailed about 300 m out from the beach at Liptons, spinning out constantly, turned around and sailed back, still spinning out. Took the fin off and never used it again, very disappointing. I appreciate there is a lot of variability with hand foiling, so your mileage may vary.






Strange I have not heard that before! Are you talking about the Delta XT or the Delta XT 50? Delta fins require you to adjust your sailing style to get the best out of them the guys that have mastered them can get away with sailing much smaller sizes which mean less resistance and contact with weed and more speed. Sailing 600m on it is not really giving it a chance it may also have been the wrong size for your set up that day. But as with everything in windsurfing what works for one person may not work for someone else.




Mine was a Delta XT 50 18, just like in the picture. The shaping was appalling, large flat spots on either side, twisted trailing edge, asymmetrical leading edge. It certainly wasn't shaped by anyone who had any concept of foil sections. But as I said, your mileage may vary, maybe mine was just shaped by someone with a bad hangover and blurred vision.

However I did feel like I had been robbed given the cost of it, was not impressed at all at throwing about $250 down the drain.

The fin has since been reshaped to put a decent foil on it but I haven't tried it yet, will let you know how it goes


I would have loved to see it before you had it reshaped if it was as bad as you are saying you would have been able to get it replaced.

sailquik
VIC, 4946 posts
25 Mar 2020 10:13PM
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I have no personal experience with the XT50, I was just going on watching Matt use them at LG this February, and they looked to work well.
Here is Matt with Carbon Art 120L, 7.8m Simmer Race and 22cm MUF XT50 22cm. Me on IS80L, KA Speed 5.7m and BP WeedSpeed50 25 (20cm). This running back crosswind through what we call chop at LG. And for those who have asked how deep it is, see Matt in waist deep when we stop at the end.

Good excuse to post more videos.



And a downwind, upwind run. Same day, same gear.



Here is a previous day with winds in the mid 20's on our speed boards. In this run Matt was on his CA50, Simmer Race 6.3m and 18cm MUF XT50 18cm. Me on CA40 KA Speed 5.2m and Curtis 17cm 50 Degree speed fin. We both peaked at 40Kt's on this run.

remery
WA, 454 posts
25 Mar 2020 7:24PM
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I don't have much to add other than I foi d heaps less spin out with a FF22 than a Delta XT 18. maybe I should give the. Latter another try to confirm.

sailquik
VIC, 4946 posts
25 Mar 2020 10:30PM
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remery said..
I don't have much to add other than I foi d heaps less spin out with a FF22 than a Delta XT 18. maybe I should give the. Latter another try to confirm.


I am sure that is the case, as the FF is very much designed to NOT spin out, but can you do 40 knots with it?

decrepit
WA, 9848 posts
25 Mar 2020 8:09PM
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sailquik said..

remery said..
I don't have much to add other than I foi d heaps less spin out with a FF22 than a Delta XT 18. maybe I should give the. Latter another try to confirm.



I am sure that is the case, as the FF is very much designed to NOT spin out, but can you do 40 knots with it?


I forget who, but somebody definitely has.

legless
WA, 833 posts
25 Mar 2020 8:39PM
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remery said..
I don't have much to add other than I foi d heaps less spin out with a FF22 than a Delta XT 18. maybe I should give the. Latter another try to confirm.


You can't compare a FF22 with a Delta XT 18 the 22 is a much bigger fin for a start. Try comparing a FF22 with a Delta XT50 22 I can tell you that the FF22will have more grip but the Delta XT50 22 will be faster. In very flat water you are better off on the Delta Xt 50 22 if there is some chop you will be able to push the FF22 harder.

fangman
WA, 910 posts
25 Mar 2020 8:39PM
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decrepit said..

sailquik said..


remery said..
I don't have much to add other than I foi d heaps less spin out with a FF22 than a Delta XT 18. maybe I should give the. Latter another try to confirm.




I am sure that is the case, as the FF is very much designed to NOT spin out, but can you do 40 knots with it?



I forget who, but somebody definitely has.


Jonski and Powersloshin have done 40's on FF20's . There are possibly more but my memory is rubbish.

remery
WA, 454 posts
25 Mar 2020 8:56PM
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sailquik said..

remery said..
I don't have much to add other than I foi d heaps less spin out with a FF22 than a Delta XT 18. maybe I should give the. Latter another try to confirm.



I am sure that is the case, as the FF is very much designed to NOT spin out, but can you do 40 knots with it?


I comfortably did 37 on a FF22. Yes, I know 3 knots more is a big jump.

sailquik
VIC, 4946 posts
26 Mar 2020 12:29AM
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fangman said..
Jonski and Powersloshin have done 40's on FF20's . There are possibly more but my memory is rubbish.







I cant find those documented, but Powersloshin has gone very close on a cut down to 17cm FF20 with a 2 sec of 39.43 Kts. So perhaps that run showed a 40 peak?

None of Jonski's GPSTC top Five (all well over 40) are on a FF, but I am sure he has done plently of others.

I think even you would agree that the normal FF is not as fast as most other weed fins, and that it was designed with other goals as a priority, and on those it does very well indeed Perhaps the newer FF speed model is a different case.

On a more general note, I have tried many, many fins over the years, and very few of those have been complete duds (but I have to say there were a few ). Some I liked a lot more than others, but of course, they are the ones that suit my particular boards, sails, skills, size and preferences and particularly, the conditions I was using them in. Almost all fins have their good points and particular uses. The trick is to match that up with your personal needs and goals.

fangman
WA, 910 posts
25 Mar 2020 10:18PM
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sailquik said.


I think even you would agree that the normal FF is not as fast as most other weed fins, and that it was designed with other goals as a priority, and on those it does very well indeed



Yes, you are absolutely correct Daffy. I said from my very first post that they were not outright speed fins. But I am just continuously surprised at the skills and ingenuity of the guys and gals who use them, to take the fins to new heights or should I say speeds, that I didn't expect.

mr love
VIC, 1915 posts
26 Mar 2020 7:40AM
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legless said..

mr love said..
The issue is that some of the G10 fins that come out of China are not CNC. At best they run a number of sections off the CNC and hand shape in between and some are hand shaped off templates. I know this as I have done research into Chinese fin factories.



I know labour is cheap in China but I find it hard to believe it would be cheaper to hand shape the fins rather than CNC them. Secondly the surface finish on the fins is not a hand finish. I am sure there are dodgy manufacturers in china but I also believe there are good ones to else brands like Neil Pryde, Gasstra would not be making sails and a whole load of other windsurfing gear in China


I am not naming or suggesting any brand here all I am saying is that I am aware of fin factories in China who do not CNC the entire fin and majority hand shape, Then there are some that do fully CNC. Fact

Jonski
WA, 65 posts
26 Mar 2020 12:31PM
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sailquik said..

fangman said..
Jonski and Powersloshin have done 40's on FF20's . There are possibly more but my memory is rubbish.








I cant find those documented, but Powersloshin has gone very close on a cut down to 17cm FF20 with a 2 sec of 39.43 Kts. So perhaps that run showed a 40 peak?

None of Jonski's GPSTC top Five (all well over 40) are on a FF, but I am sure he has done plently of others.

I think even you would agree that the normal FF is not as fast as most other weed fins, and that it was designed with other goals as a priority, and on those it does very well indeed Perhaps the newer FF speed model is a different case.

On a more general note, I have tried many, many fins over the years, and very few of those have been complete duds (but I have to say there were a few ). Some I liked a lot more than others, but of course, they are the ones that suit my particular boards, sails, skills, size and preferences and particularly, the conditions I was using them in. Almost all fins have their good points and particular uses. The trick is to match that up with your personal needs and goals.


Yeah my claim to a 40 knot FF20 is from a session with a 2 sec speed of 39.83 however whilst talking **** on the beach I like to use the 40.2 knot peak to back up my claims

sailquik
VIC, 4946 posts
26 Mar 2020 5:59PM
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Jonski said..Yeah my claim to a 40 knot FF20 is from a session with a 2 sec speed of 39.83 however whilst talking **** on the beach I like to use the 40.2 knot peak to back up my claims


As we do!

decrepit
WA, 9848 posts
26 Mar 2020 3:56PM
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So the fangy fins probably aren't the fastest fins out there, If you're after top speed, there's faster fins around.
But they aren't slow.
And they cover all bases, for their depth and rake are good in chop, extremely good in heavy surface weed. And very abrasive resistant, you don't have to come in frequently to touch up the leading edge.
Lake George where the weed is usually under the surface and non abrasive, probably doesn't need a fangy fin as much as other weedy spots. But there are areas that can damage the bottom of an ordinary fin, shallow reef and big rocks. Best not to go there, but if you do, you'll come out better with a fangy.

remery
WA, 454 posts
26 Mar 2020 4:08PM
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Jonski said..
Yeah my claim to a 40 knot FF20 is from a session with a 2 sec speed of 39.83 however whilst talking **** on the beach I like to use the 40.2 knot peak to back up my claims


Ok, can I update my FF22 speed to 37.9

YP1
SA, 107 posts
27 Mar 2020 11:49AM
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I had a bad run with my mfu delta's if you hit anything the fin would split . Like the g10 layers were not laminated properly

legless
WA, 833 posts
28 Mar 2020 2:21AM
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YP1 said..
I had a bad run with my mfu delta's if you hit anything the fin would split . Like the g10 layers were not laminated properly


Sorry that is just not correct. Hitting "anything" would split the fin! I have see loads of MUF Delta's at Budgie that have been used for years and run at well over 30 knots through the mud sand and weed with barnacles so much so the fins have been worn down to have the round shape of the Delta XT 50 rather than the angular squared off original delta.

I am assuming you are referring to your old Delta Speed 18 you have pictured on seabreeze. The Delta Speed was the thinnest and sharpest leading edge delta produced. The amount of damage you have done to that fin indicated you hit something or things very hard like rock at speed. It I remember right your local has some shallow areas at low tide with a hard bottom and lots of razor fish. I think you can't expect any delta fin or any fin for that matter to come away undamaged from hitting something hard at speed and the harder you hit it or the more times you hit it without raking repairs can lead to other damage to the fin like a perception of splitting it has nothing to do with g10 not being laminated properly.

I see you now have fangy fins unfortunately even a metal fin can be damaged if you hit something hard and fast enough!





YP1
SA, 107 posts
Sunday , 29 Mar 2020 9:18AM
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legless said..

YP1 said..
I had a bad run with my mfu delta's if you hit anything the fin would split . Like the g10 layers were not laminated properly



Sorry that is just not correct. Hitting "anything" would split the fin! I have see loads of MUF Delta's at Budgie that have been used for years and run at well over 30 knots through the mud sand and weed with barnacles so much so the fins have been worn down to have the round shape of the Delta XT 50 rather than the angular squared off original delta.

I am assuming you are referring to your old Delta Speed 18 you have pictured on seabreeze. The Delta Speed was the thinnest and sharpest leading edge delta produced. The amount of damage you have done to that fin indicated you hit something or things very hard like rock at speed. It I remember right your local has some shallow areas at low tide with a hard bottom and lots of razor fish. I think you can't expect any delta fin or any fin for that matter to come away undamaged from hitting something hard at speed and the harder you hit it or the more times you hit it without raking repairs can lead to other damage to the fin like a perception of splitting it has nothing to do with g10 not being laminated properly.

I see you now have fangy fins unfortunately even a metal fin can be damaged if you hit something hard and fast enough!






Yes you are right it is the original delta but after 1 outing the de-lamination was terrible
So its show n tell ?! here is one of Wolfgangs CARBON fins after > 50 sessions in the same conditions. He makes a dam good fin that seems to be "tougher" than it should be for carbon. It is still a good usuable fin, even after all the punishment I have inflicted.



So as I said I had a bad run with my MFU deltas besides the fact the performance of the fin was rubbish

mr love
VIC, 1915 posts
Sunday , 29 Mar 2020 11:48AM
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These designs are at the Tribal team being prototyped. The 2 smaller ones are semi delta designs called Ground Zero Ha! They are 50 deg at the base and the section varies from 7.5% to 8.2%, a modified version of my latest slalom section. 16cm and 20cm shown.
The larger fin is a weed version of the Weapon slalom fin. Slightly thinner section at 10% , the slalom is 10.5% but has a longer chord. It is 44 degrees at the base, 26cm shown.
Very interested to see how they go, obviously can't test at Lake George for a while though.
I guess I have lots of time to design s..t at the moment......send me a project.




decrepit
WA, 9848 posts
Sunday , 29 Mar 2020 9:27AM
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YP1 said.. >>>So its show n tell ?! here is one of Wolfgangs CARBON fins after > 50 sessions in the same conditions.

The difference is that the carbon wraps around the foil, so the fibres are holding the fin together. With a shaped G10 blank it's only the resin holding the fin together. The scrape marks on the carbon, would have inserted themselves in between glass layers. The resin bond just isn't strong enough to hold the layers together, so it splits.
This is one advantage of a moulded fin over a shaped fin.

legless
WA, 833 posts
Sunday , 29 Mar 2020 10:54AM
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YP1 said..
Yes you are right it is the original delta but after 1 outing the de-lamination was terrible
So its show n tell ?! here is one of Wolfgangs CARBON fins after > 50 sessions in the same conditions. He makes a dam good fin that seems to be "tougher" than it should be for carbon. It is still a good usuable fin, even after all the punishment I have inflicted.

So as I said I had a bad run with my MFU deltas besides the fact the performance of the fin was rubbish





Again you are not comparing apples with apples. And I very much doubt you would have used the carbon slalom fin in the same conditions/location as a Delta Speed 18 if you did, it would go a long way to explaining why you had the performance difference.

1. if you want to make a durability comparison fin another brand of Delta fin made of G10 and sail that at 30 plus knots into an hard solid obstacle and then compare the damage with the Delta Speed 18.

2. You can't compare the performance of a carbon upright slalom fin with a Delta Speed 18. For one the performance of the Carbon slalom in thick weed and shallow water would be rubbish actually it would just not work. You will have bugger all grip with the Del;ta speed in deep water but you would be able to get it home.

3 Take your carbon slalom fin and sail at 30 plus knots in deep water then keep sailing at 30 plus knots towards a shallow rock area with thick weed. after you have come to an abrupt stop and catapulted get up if you can and have a look at the damage to the fin possibly the board maybe the boom mast and sail. Then ask your self even with the performance difference would I have not been better off using the Delta speed and caused less damage to myself and my gear.

4, The damage to your delta speed 18 pictured on seabreese was not done after one sail unless you hit something very hard when you were going fast. More likely it is the result of multiply hard hits from multiply session with little attempt to repair the damage between sessions.

5. A quality carbon fin is far more expensive than a G10 fin.

I find it strange that many people here just don't seem to get it and are unwilling to accept that everything in windsurfing is a compromise. You can make equipment that will perform and the best possible for all conditions or in the same way in all conditions. To get the best out of any specific conditions you have to sacrifice performance in other conditions. Delta Fins are designed for flat shallow water with thick weed the faster you make them the less grip they will have particularly when going slower than they are designed to go. In addition to that you have to change your sailing style to get the best out of them.

I really like the Fangy fin design I think he has made a great fin to get you on the water particularly for the conditions he sails around Mandurah. I am not concerned that it is not the fastest design because that is the compromise because the faster you make it the less grip it will have when not sailing at the speed it was designed to sail at. For me the important thing it getting on the water and planning so If they were not metal I would prefer to use a Fangy fin in shallow weedy water. The other issue with fangy fins at the moment is depth unless you cut them down. At Budgie I have run aground using 16cm delta XT50 so I would not have been able to use a standard FF. The sailed water conditions at Budgie tend to have more shallower areas than the sailing spots around Mandurah.

Although people here have wrongly over quote prices of MUF Delta XT 50 by 25% because they are a CNC G10 delta fin they are the most reasonably priced. You just have to be willing to understand the compromise and that they perform best the flatter the water is and are great for shallow water weedy spots you can't sail with a upright fin or a standard weed fin.

fangman
WA, 910 posts
Sunday , 29 Mar 2020 12:16PM
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Hey Legless, I agree with most of your points, but for the sake of my own annoying curiosity, can you please tell me why your preference is to use fins made of G10 rather than aluminium? I went through all the materials I could find and with the various compromises ( strength, cost, availability, durability etc) factored in, and I ended up with aluminium and obviously, I am rather emotionally invested in it now. I understand that very few people have a brain that wanders off on its own weird little creative paths like mine, and so I am also interested to try to understand different points of view and the decision making behind those views.
(Again apologies to the OP, but I think we can consider this thread well and truly hijacked now)

legless
WA, 833 posts
Sunday , 29 Mar 2020 1:10PM
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fangman said..
Hey Legless, I agree with most of your points, but for the sake of my own annoying curiosity, can you please tell me why your preference is to use fins made of G10 rather than aluminium? I went through all the materials I could find and with the various compromises ( strength, cost, availability, durability etc) factored in, and I ended up with aluminium and obviously, I am rather emotionally invested in it now. I understand that very few people have a brain that wanders off on its own weird little creative paths like mine, and so I am also interested to try to understand different points of view and the decision making behind those views.
(Again apologies to the OP, but I think we can consider this thread well and truly hijacked now)


Hi Fangy I think it is great that you have managed to create a fin to solve the issues people were having trying to sail thick weed with the original delta's. I also think your combined powerbox / tuttle box solution is a clever way to go and very practical unfortunately something I think would be hard to make work in G10. You are right aluminium was the only way you could end up going under the circumstances. I don't have a preference for G10 it is just what is available for delta fins that I can get hold of. Yes there are some carbon ones but I do not think they are as durable and as easy to sand away any dings but on big deltas you save lots of weight going with carbon. I just not comfortable sailing with metal fins, also most of my boards are twin fin so have two Aluminium FF would not be the go (Twin fins need thinner profile fins) particularly combined with my 140kg.. It is a pity the market is so small because I think in smaller sizes there is a real opportunity for an injected moulded version which after the initial set up costs would be cheap to produce not as durable as aluminium but lighter and they would pop out of the mould without the need for additional work. But the cost to set up the production makes it not viable.

decrepit
WA, 9848 posts
Sunday , 29 Mar 2020 1:23PM
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fangman said..
>>>
(Again apologies to the OP, but I think we can consider this thread well and truly hijacked now)


I don't think you need to apologise too much. discussing the relative merits of suitable fins, is still in context. As legless says, it's all a compromise, so all the information you can get, helps choose what compromise suites you the best.

fangman
WA, 910 posts
Sunday , 29 Mar 2020 1:59PM
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Thank you Legless, I appreciate you taking the time to explain your thoughts.
Just as side-note, surprisingly G10 and Aluminium are very similar density, so in the thin foils the two are very similar in weight. When using 'fat' (i.e.8%+) foils, the ability to make the foils hollow plus the 'framework like' bases, the aluminium is lighter than the equivalent solid fin in G10, (but obvi not carbon!)

sailquik
VIC, 4946 posts
Sunday , 29 Mar 2020 5:02PM
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Yes, every type of fin has it's place where it is the best compromise according to the conditions and use.

I own and have used the MUF Delta fin in sizes 18-20cm deep. I call them the 'Necessary Evil', They are the fin I used to use when all else failed because of thick floating weed and shallow water. In these conditions they work just fine as the water is completely FLAT! They enable you to have fun in extreme conditions where it would not be possible otherwise.
As soon as I encountered a bit of small chop I had to drastically back off or they were prone to sudden spinout and they dont go upwind very well, especially if there is some chop. But if you dont have chop, they work OK, and they get you out on the water.

The MUF XT50 (and 47?) seems to be a much safer fin in small chop, as evidenced from Matt's performances and the video's I posted earlier in the thread. They still cut through the thick weed very well, as well as any other 50 degree raked fin, and have a lot of area for their depth, but probably not quite as good in extreme thick weed and extreme shallows as the Original MUF Delta.

I also have a Black Project Kestral 16cm. That is also 50 degrees AFAIK, and it too cuts through very thick weed and is good in the shallows. My experience is that is much less prone to spinout than the original MUF Delta, but is not in the same category for extemem leading edge rake. Since I have not ridden the XT50, I cant compare, but I am guessing they are very similar. I did a peak speed of 45 knots in the Kestrel 16cm last year in very thick weed and very flat water in a Gale at LG in April or May last year..

This year, as I have said before, the weed in Lake George is thicker than previous years, but more importantly, there is much more of the floating and sticky green slimy weed this year. This means I found I needed 50 degree fins where in the past I was fine with 40 degrees (and less)

I used the BP WeedSpeed 50 - '25' (20cm deep) at lake George this year when I got the 'new for me' 2017 IS80 and found my other fins were not working as well in this board as in my older ones. This is an important point, because some boards just like some types of fins. I dont know why really, but it is something I have found quite a few times over the years. The BP is also 50 degree rake and worked very well. I had lent it to my friend Peter last year who did his first ever 40 knot peak on it in his Futura 90. I got very high 30's with this fin this year in not a lot of wind, but felt I needed a bit more area to go upwind better. I managed to buy a 21cm Techtonic Speed Demon as it was available at LG, and that worked better as it was bigger (more area) It felt safer for that reason and went upwind better. I still managed to crack 40 in the slalom board with it so I am very happy indeed with it. Thinking I could use a smaller one and maybe go faster I bought a used 17cm Techtonics Speed Demon. I found this was too small for the sail and board combo and was again having security issues (spinouts). I think that fin will work very well in my speed board, but I have not tried it yet as i have others that I know work well in the same rake and depth.

After my fast session at LG last year in the big blow and very thick weed, I realised a needed a fin that would slide over the weed even easier, and was shallower. The Tribal Delta weed looked very good to me having large area for its depth and a very high degree of rake, especially in the smallest sizes. So I bought two just for this circumstance, a 12cm and a 14cm. I had a chance to try them in my CA40 speed board at Budgiewoi last June in very shallow, thick weed-burg water. I could not find the 14cm in the trailer on the day, so it was with some trepidation that I fitted the 12cm hoping it would hang on OK. I was amazed to say the least. It not only held on well and shed the weed superbly, but it was even pretty good up wind and even more surprisingly, it didn't spin out in moderate chop at all. Yes, it did spin out when the mirror flat water suddenly ended and I found myself in 1-2 foot waves at well over 35 knots at the end of the speed runs, but anything would have in that situation. I didn't quite crack 40 that day, but was in the high 39's. along with a few other sailors.

There are undoubtably other fins out there that would work very well in the various scenarios that I have described. You just have to find what works in your particular board and match it to the actual conditions and the goals you have. The last part is the very important part.

As some very wise people have said in the past. It's not any one component that makes you go fast, no matter how 'good' it is.

It's the COMBINATION of equipment, rigging and sailor that is optimised for the conditions and the particular task that counts.



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"Weed Fins for Lake George" started by Old Salty